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Old 03-16-2016, 11:33 AM   #1
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12V Battery Verse 2 6Volt

Just trying to see the reason for 2 6 Volt verse the one 12Volt that I have on my Roo?

I do not dry camp always hook up to a 15 or 30amp service so why would I want to swap a 12 for 2 sixes?

Had this talk with a guy in CW and got me wondering if I would benefit from that or even a second 12Volt?

I have a Roo 23ikss and I was thinking of getting a Zamp 120Watt Solar Panel.
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Old 03-16-2016, 11:55 AM   #2
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6 volt batteries are typically "deep cycle" batteries that were developed for golf carts. They can take deeper discharges, and more often, than most 12 volt batteries. If you rarely boondock, then you probably would NOT want to spend the money for 6 volt batteries.

A 2nd 12 volt would probably be useful if you boondock occasionally. It comes down to your specific camping practices and how much you're willing to spend.
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Old 03-16-2016, 12:40 PM   #3
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Curious as to why you would want a solar panel if you always camp hooked up to electric? Same goes for your battery question, you wouldn't need any additional battery capacity if you are not using your batteries anyway.
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Old 03-16-2016, 12:51 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wharfrat48 View Post
Curious as to why you would want a solar panel if you always camp hooked up to electric? Same goes for your battery question, you wouldn't need any additional battery capacity if you are not using your batteries anyway.


Thinking I would like to dry camp here or there so solar panels help with keeping battery charged I was more curious of the 12v verse (2) 6 v battery thing. I am thinking of hitting some beaches and state parks without a hookup, but not sure it is worth it though for the short Camping season on the East, as I only camp in warm weather
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Old 03-16-2016, 01:13 PM   #5
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If you never camp without a shore power hookup, you'll be fine with a single Group 24 12V deep cycle battery.

If you want to camp without shore power for a weekend, you could probably get by with a couple of Group 31, 12V deep cycle batteries. That may be less expensive than going with 2 - 6V batteries and you'd have a backup 12V battery.

Charging your batteries with solar these days may be less expensive than a good quality small inverter generator but the gennie does have its advantages besides charging.
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Old 03-16-2016, 01:18 PM   #6
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One thing to remember if you put 2 6 volt in and one goes bad your just screwed where with 2 12 volt you would still have power...
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Old 03-16-2016, 01:41 PM   #7
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You have 2 separate issues here - 2 batteries vs. one and 6V vs. 12v


Having 2 batteries gives you something in the range of twice as much available power as one battery (depending on the exact capacity of the batteries involved). If you want to dry camp more than a couple days at a time this is worth considering.


6V vs 12V is somewhat of a preference. The 6 volts generally have thicker plates and more suited to true deep cycle applications and will last longer, assuming proper charging and maintenance. But, you can't have just one 6V, so you have to answer the 1 vs 2 question first.
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Old 03-16-2016, 02:47 PM   #8
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I'll add my 22 cents (I'm long winded)... note DW has a cpap and we have been successfully camping offgrid for over a decade.

The very first thing you need to do before you spend money on batteries or solar is to GO CAMPING and pay attention to what you use!!! If you want really good data, invest in a trimetric, TM-2030 battery monitor.

You will quickly waste $$ if you just start guessing how much you need of what. Find out how you like to camp and what you want to use while camping without hookups. For example, if you can live without TV while off grid, that is less power you need.

The ZAMP solar systems, as they are out of the box, are useless for all but trickle charging. It is simple physics, and when you use tiny wire causing a high voltage drop combined with placing your charge controller tens of feet away from the batteries you will never charge anything decently. You can modify them to work better but then why pay the premium for their 'plug-n-play system' that you can't plug-n-play??

Here are Dragon-roo's guidlines... YMMV!
  • The first change to make if you want to camp off grid is to conserve.
  • The second thing to change if you want to camp off grid is to conserve more!
  • When DW doesn't want to conserve it can only be offset by investment $$
  • When adding batteries it is 'usually' just as important to upgrade the wiring on most RVs.
  • Solar is for charging batteries, NOT for powering your devices (unless you have a solar surplus) and thus offsets the need to plug in or run the generator
  • More batteries are dead weight if you don't need them
  • not all batteries are created equal
  • OEM installed 'converters' are junk if you want to take care of your batteries and/or charge them quickly.
  • $$ spent does not have much correlation to how well your system works... there are a lot of so called 'professionals' that do NOT know what they are doing
If you are almost always plugged in, then you have no need for solar. If you want to do the occasional 4 day weekend, unplugged, then get a couple of GOOD group 31 batteries. Leave the extra at home when you don't need it. Some would prefer to have a pair of 6v batteries and just always tote both around. Pros and cons to both.

There are so many 'phantom' loads on the new RVs that you can considerably increase your battery run time by pulling a couple of fuses on things you aren't using while off grid!

Before you invest in ANY solar you should read...
https://handybobsolar.wordpress.com/
Jack and Danielle Mayer

Note that both of these sources are primarily addressing the fulltime crowd so some of their recomendations are a bit more than some of us 'campers' need.
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Old 03-16-2016, 04:43 PM   #9
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If you don't camp without hookups or you're camping just 21 or 2 nights, then stick with the one 12v.
But if you see dry camping or boondocking in your future, then you'll need the two batteries setup.
I would've gone with the 6v pair bit they are taller than the 12v, which caused clearance problems.
We dry camp 85% of the time, so we're setup for doing weeks of that.
My personal preference is my Honda 2000i, over solar. Runs the microphone and can run the a/c at lower altitude and isn't affected by shade or trees.
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Old 03-16-2016, 05:10 PM   #10
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I will dry camp maybe once per season for a few days, I will most likely stick with the one 12 volt battery and bring my charger so I can charge the 12v from my truck if I had to. I am not interested in dry camping especially if I head out to the Grand Canyon
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