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Old 08-11-2015, 01:18 PM   #1
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23IKSS Tire Pressure?

My tires looked a little bit low yesterday. So I check the pressure and it was just over 40 PSI. On the tires it shows a max of 50 PSI if I am reading them correctly. Are there recommendations on tire pressure? Has anyone installed a TPMS on their trailer tires and if so any comments?

(BTW, we have only had the trailer for 3 weeks and I assumed the dealer would have set the tires to the correct pressure before delivery. We have maybe driven 200 miles, if that.)
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Old 08-11-2015, 01:47 PM   #2
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Pressure is dependent on altitude and temp. Generally you want to check your tire pressure before each trip. I check my tires before I move the trailer out of the driveway. Given I live at altitude 5,600' I know the tire pressure will higher at my destination if it's above 5,600' and will be lower at the destination if it's below 5,600'.

Generally you need to check the pressure when the tires are cold, ~ 70 to 75 *F. There are several post about checking/ setting tire pressure when the air temps are out side this standard temp.

The max cold tire pressure will give you the specified tire ratings for load capacity. I generally air my tires at the max air pressure, unless I am traveling in sand or over large rocks. Then I typically air down to 10lbs under the max pressure rating.


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Old 08-11-2015, 01:56 PM   #3
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Thanks, Eric. We are at 5,600' as well. (Denver). ;-) Mine were at 41-42 yesterday when I checked and they weren't "cold". I suspect they are low as the Max under load is 50. I'll check them the next time I'm at the storage facility and adjust them appropriately. I'll don't plan on taking the trailer in sand or over rock terrain - that's what we have our Land Rover for. ;-)
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Old 08-11-2015, 04:24 PM   #4
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Yea I included the info on the elevations, because I live in Gypsum. If your tires were warmer than 70-75 and reading 41-42 they were low. The tires will get warm as the roll on the road, so check them before you leave on a trip. The best thing is to check your tires the night before the trip in the evening when it cools off.

Just remember the altitude and temp impacts on tire pressure. If you leave Denver and camp in Leadville or Moab the tire pressure will most likely be higher pressure than it was in Denver. Leadville due to the higher elevation and Moab due to the heat of the day; assuming summertime travel.

Tires are very much like the food contains sealed at lower elevations. We get them and the packages are all bloated and when we open them they pop/burp when open due to the higher pressure inside the package.

If you camp in the sand in Moab, it might help to air down the tires to help them float. You will want to air them up once you are back on the pavement.


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Old 08-11-2015, 04:27 PM   #5
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Best to check them first thing in the morning and before the sun starts to shine on them. Even if air temps are cool, the warmth of the sun on the black tires will warm them up quickly. I keep the tires on our 2015 23IKSS at 50psi cold pressure, and I check it before every trip. From what I've read on here, you will do more damage to your tires by having them under inflated than having them over inflated (within reason). We've put 5,000 miles on our tires so far and they still look great.
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Old 08-11-2015, 05:02 PM   #6
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Mine came with Nitrogen in all of the tires. Even the spare. Sure is nice as you never have to worry about them.
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Old 08-11-2015, 05:13 PM   #7
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Tire pressure is more art than science. Tire pressure varies with ambient air temp, tire temp, air temp within the tire, altitude and the load/ weight of the trailer. Plus the age of the rubber adds another very small factor.

Try to get the tires to max pressure when they and air temps are close to 70-75. It is better to check the pressure before you load up the trailer with items need for your get away.

The standard tire gauge, that pops out a stick gauge, works well as it depends mostly on the pressure blast of the air within the tire. Some of the air gauges that have dial gauges depend somewhat on atmospheric pressure as they give pressure related to differential pressure between the atmosphere and the tire. These are typically calibrated for sea level, so they can be way off at our elevations.

For highway travel I would rather have a tire closer to the max pressure.





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Old 08-11-2015, 06:51 PM   #8
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Just a side note. Last year I replaced the tires on my camper with Goodyear radial tires. I did this mostly due to rutted roads here in the west. Yea in this day and age you can find wagon ruts on interstate 70!

Anyway the radial tires handle the ruts better, but you can really notice low tire pressure on the trailer. A few psi is just as noticeable as a few hundred pounds.

My TV is a V8 Tundra Crew Max, so it's not as noticeable as towing with a Chevy Chevette L4 but still noticeable.




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Old 08-11-2015, 07:07 PM   #9
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As a former tireman, I always run my tires at max pressure.
The majority of early tire wear issues , i saw, was from under inflation.
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Old 08-11-2015, 07:18 PM   #10
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Thanks, Everyone. 50 psi it is.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Kansas Camper View Post
Mine came with Nitrogen in all of the tires. Even the spare. Sure is nice as you never have to worry about them.
Kansas Camper - ours are "Nitrogen" filled as well. Except they didn't fill them. Not if they were measuring 42 while warm. The Nitrogen is supposed to hold better and I've had it in my cars. But our trailer was only 3 weeks old, less than 200 miles (maybe less than 100) and they were reading way low.
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