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Old 06-11-2016, 01:09 AM   #1
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Connecting Magnum 1212 to AC on a 23WS

After installing the Trimetric monitor and solar controller with a couple of 100 watt Renogy solar panels and a Magnum MM1212 charger/inverter, the last thing to do is connect hardwire the Magnum to the AC. This has me stumped. Does the 23 WS have a subpanel? Has anyone done this that can explain it to me? I'm in over my head in this one. Thanks in advance!
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Old 06-11-2016, 01:50 AM   #2
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Your 20a input is the circuit you run from your existing breaker box to your AC input of the inverter.

When the inverter is not in use and you are connected to shore pwr that voltage is passed through to whatever circuit you have connected to the AC out.

When shore pwr is disconnected, the inverters transfer switch engages and your AC out is supplied from your inverter using your batteries.

The AC out can be as simple as one outlet or you can build a sub-panel.

The sub-panel would consist of any circuit(s) that you would disconnect from your existing breaker box and connect to a breaker in the new sub-panel.
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Old 06-11-2016, 09:56 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ramblin Recks View Post
Your 20a input is the circuit you run from your existing breaker box to your AC input of the inverter.

When the inverter is not in use and you are connected to shore pwr that voltage is passed through to whatever circuit you have connected to the AC out.

When shore pwr is disconnected, the inverters transfer switch engages and your AC out is supplied from your inverter using your batteries.

The AC out can be as simple as one outlet or you can build a sub-panel.

The sub-panel would consist of any circuit(s) that you would disconnect from your existing breaker box and connect to a breaker in the new sub-panel.
When you say it can be as easy as an outlet, are you saying that you can install a GFI instead of a panel as an overload protector? Thanks for your help!
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Old 06-11-2016, 01:02 PM   #4
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I went with an in-between solution. I found a deal on a modified sine wave inverter with a built in transfer switch. I went with a simplified version of the sub-panel concept. Since all the outlets in the Roo are on one circuit, I ran that one circuit to the transfer switch directly so it works like a subpanel setup, but you don't need the actual subpanel.


Here is what I did:


I mounted the inverter in the front pass thorough. Pulled the AC panel out of the wall and spliced into the wire coming out of the breaker for the 110v outlets. The line coming from that breaker gets run to the 110V input on the inverter. The 110V output of the inverter then runs back to connect to the line feeding the outlets. In our Roo, the breakers are in the back, so I just drilled 2 small holes in the floor and run wires underneath in the same bundles as the existing wiring.


The result is when shore power is present it just gets passed through the inverter and feed the outlets. When you don't have shore power, the inverter can automatically feed all the outlets with everything else still isolated.


The only thing I need to do is manually switch the fridge to propane. At least on ours, the electric supply to the fridge is on the same circuit as the outlets and I don't want to be running the fridge on battery power! I thought about putting the fridge on its own circuit but never bothered to separate it.


I attached a diagram showing the sub panel wiring, and you can simplify this setup by just wiring the one circuit into the inverter. I think it makes a good solution and clean setup where all your existing outlets work seamlessly on shore power or battery power.
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File Type: pdf PRO Series Electrical.pdf (161.8 KB, 13 views)
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Old 06-11-2016, 03:13 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KMP44 View Post
I went with an in-between solution. I found a deal on a modified sine wave inverter with a built in transfer switch. I went with a simplified version of the sub-panel concept. Since all the outlets in the Roo are on one circuit, I ran that one circuit to the transfer switch directly so it works like a subpanel setup, but you don't need the actual subpanel.


Here is what I did:


I mounted the inverter in the front pass thorough. Pulled the AC panel out of the wall and spliced into the wire coming out of the breaker for the 110v outlets. The line coming from that breaker gets run to the 110V input on the inverter. The 110V output of the inverter then runs back to connect to the line feeding the outlets. In our Roo, the breakers are in the back, so I just drilled 2 small holes in the floor and run wires underneath in the same bundles as the existing wiring.


The result is when shore power is present it just gets passed through the inverter and feed the outlets. When you don't have shore power, the inverter can automatically feed all the outlets with everything else still isolated.


The only thing I need to do is manually switch the fridge to propane. At least on ours, the electric supply to the fridge is on the same circuit as the outlets and I don't want to be running the fridge on battery power! I thought about putting the fridge on its own circuit but never bothered to separate it.


I attached a diagram showing the sub panel wiring, and you can simplify this setup by just wiring the one circuit into the inverter. I think it makes a good solution and clean setup where all your existing outlets work seamlessly on shore power or battery power.
This was so helpful. I think we're going to be able to do this--thank you!
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