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Old 04-11-2014, 01:35 PM   #21
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I said top but don't have a reason for it outside of it was the first thought that I had.

Curious why you would opt for the bottom?
Keeps the block square to the ground. That way the forces exterated by the trailer sitting on them drive to ground instead of slightly skewed based on the angle of the driveway.

His slope doesn't look to bad to make much of a difference, but still...
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Old 04-11-2014, 01:37 PM   #22
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I said top but don't have a reason for it outside of it was the first thought that I had.

Curious why you would opt for the bottom?
Increases surface area to prevent moving or tipping.
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Old 04-11-2014, 01:37 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by Kaadk View Post
Keeps the block square to the ground. That way the forces exterated by the trailer sitting on them drive to ground instead of slightly skewed based on the angle of the driveway.

His slope doesn't look to bad to make much of a difference, but still...
Makes sense! Ok, I amend my previous post- angle the bottom.

Thanks.
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Old 04-11-2014, 01:39 PM   #24
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Increases surface area to prevent moving or tipping.
That too.

(Note: I was a terrible engineer, that's why I switched to Comp Sci. )
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Old 04-11-2014, 03:07 PM   #25
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Keeps the block square to the ground. That way the forces exterated by the trailer sitting on them drive to ground instead of slightly skewed based on the angle of the driveway.
I respectfully disagree. You want the block to be plumb (straight up and down), i.e., put the angled portion onto the driveway so the top of the block is still level. This will take the weight straight down through the block to the driveway. If you put the block square with the driveway, it will be angled, and the weight of the trailer will not be straight down to the ground. (You can easily see this if you "pretend" your driveway is at a 45 degree angle. The top of the block would be angled out past the bottom of the block, especially if the block if fairly "high" (say a couple of feet)). Actually the best "block" is a trapezoidal block, as suggested by kaadk. That way the bottom is wider than the top, which will resist overturning.
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Old 04-11-2014, 03:25 PM   #26
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I respectfully disagree. You want the block to be plumb (straight up and down), i.e., put the angled portion onto the driveway so the top of the block is still level. This will take the weight straight down through the block to the driveway. If you put the block square with the driveway, it will be angled, and the weight of the trailer will not be straight down to the ground. (You can easily see this if you "pretend" your driveway is at a 45 degree angle. The top of the block would be angled out past the bottom of the block, especially if the block if fairly "high" (say a couple of feet)). Actually the best "block" is a trapezoidal block, as suggested by kaadk. That way the bottom is wider than the top, which will resist overturning.

Actually, I'd say that's an agree, not a disagree. What I meant was to keep the block square to ground, not square to the slope (i.e. plumb, but for some strange reason that word didn't come to me at the time.) We're both saying the same things. Angle the bottom to match slope will allow the weight to transfer straight to ground.
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Old 04-11-2014, 06:41 PM   #27
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I have some other logs that are in a little better shape...and I will most likely cut the bottom to match angle of driveway .... And do the same for the tongue....so that I do not have to extend the tongue so far out.... Yes....to answer an above post, I want to make sure my stabilizer plates and tongue plates sit parallel to level...as much as possible. I appreciate all the input!!!!
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Old 04-11-2014, 06:47 PM   #28
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Buy or make some Bal X Chock type blocks for between the tires and tighten them down as added insurance.
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Old 04-11-2014, 06:54 PM   #29
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The biggest issue I see is the cinder block on the tongue jack. It is turned the wrong way. It is on its side & at its weakest. Better to put it the direction it was designed & put a 2x on it at least its size. Seen many fail when laid on their side to support weight. Better to have a solid block (or solid wood)....... Other than that......

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Old 04-11-2014, 06:56 PM   #30
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The biggest issue I see is the cinder block on the tongue jack. It is turned the wrong way. It is on its side & at its weakest. Better to put it the direction it was designed & put a 2x on it at least its size. Seen many fail when laid on their side to support weight. Better to have a solid block (or solid wood)....... Other than that......

X100 Any bare metal on concrete is a no, no.
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