Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-08-2014, 07:35 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Gahanna, OH
Posts: 1,414
Quote:
Originally Posted by kenandterry View Post
Personally............the OP should find another dealer for his RV concerns.

Guys like him give the business a bad name. A dealer would be better off to admit he doesn't know than lead you down the garden path with a story like his.
It's a shame they do that kind of stuff. Good thing there is the internet with forums like this. The dealer we bought our coach from will get nothing but incoming fire from us. I'll give you the shirt off my back until you try to cheat or lie to me. Like I said, it's a shame.
__________________

__________________
2014 Georgetown 351DS
-TruCenter -Front/Rear CHF -Hellwig Links -Tiger Trak -Ran McNally GPS -ScanGauge -Truck Systems TPMS -5 Star Tune
alparmer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2014, 11:59 AM   #12
Senior Member
 
urocav2001's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 560
Yeah this camper store is a joke!!! They go thru service reps like water, none seem to know any info of campers..
__________________

__________________
urocav2001 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2014, 12:08 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
VinceU's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 3,502
Quote:
Originally Posted by urocav2001 View Post
Yeah this camper store is a joke!!! They go thru service reps like water, none seem to know any info of campers..
To answer your question why does it neck down? As the metal breaks down it generates a small current, the shortest path to the opposite polarity is the head of the plug and rod connection. All anodes breakdown there first.
__________________
VinceU is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2014, 01:32 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Gainesville, FL
Posts: 733
Quote:
Originally Posted by VinceU View Post
To answer your question why does it neck down? As the metal breaks down it generates a small current, the shortest path to the opposite polarity is the head of the plug and rod connection. All anodes breakdown there first.
Good information. Thanks.
__________________
- 1969 Coleman Williamsburg (with original canvas!)
- 2000 Coleman Mesa
- 2014 Shamrock 21DK
- 1999 Chevrolet Astro
- 2005 Dodge Durango Limited 4x2 5L V8 Hemi

- 2016 Ford F-150 SCrew Lariat 4x2 3.5L V6 Ecoboost
chriscowles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2014, 03:16 PM   #15
Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 45
Sacrificial anode

No first hand experience on these RV units, but I just picked up a new RV and my tech said replacing every year was typical. This of course depends on water quality and I'm guessing many folks replace sooner than needed as it "looks" used. As a now retired engineer, I will say that as long as you have sacrificial molecules, you are OK. When they are gone, the tank will corrode quickly. Looks like you may be better than average and have a couple of seasons left. I think this is roughly a $ 10 - 20 replacement part. I'll probably pick up one and carry as a spare for when mine needs replaced. I did not look at the offered material while I was in the store but see a lot of Aluminum and Aluminum alloy on line as well as Magnesium. Magnesium would give the best protection (cost the most) and corrode the fastest. Pure Al would be cheapest, corrode slowest, and give the least cathodic protection. So not looking "new" after one season could be a good thing and shows the tank is being protected from corrosion, and the sacrificial anode is working as designed !
__________________
richl167 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2014, 03:49 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Gainesville, FL
Posts: 733
Quote:
Originally Posted by richl167 View Post
(I) ... see a lot of Aluminum and Aluminum alloy on line as well as Magnesium. Magnesium would give the best protection (cost the most) and corrode the fastest. Pure Al would be cheapest, corrode slowest, and give the least cathodic protection.
Is aluminum alloy somewhere in between?
__________________
- 1969 Coleman Williamsburg (with original canvas!)
- 2000 Coleman Mesa
- 2014 Shamrock 21DK
- 1999 Chevrolet Astro
- 2005 Dodge Durango Limited 4x2 5L V8 Hemi

- 2016 Ford F-150 SCrew Lariat 4x2 3.5L V6 Ecoboost
chriscowles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2014, 08:12 PM   #17
Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 45
Yes. sometimes a little tin or zinc is added to the al for water heater catholic protection. I don't think it changes the cathodic protection much but can combat sulphur if it is in the water and give a better taste/smell to the water. Again, for these RV ones would have to check what materials are actually available.
__________________
richl167 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2014, 08:34 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Gainesville, FL
Posts: 733
So, if Al alloy are available and don't change the cathodic protection but offer some benefit with respect to taste and smell, it seems they might be better for RV applications? I draw that conclusion from the fact RV owners are exposed to a variety of water qualities, including smelly sulphur water. That assumes that Al alloy is sufficiently protective, even if not as protective as Mg.
__________________
- 1969 Coleman Williamsburg (with original canvas!)
- 2000 Coleman Mesa
- 2014 Shamrock 21DK
- 1999 Chevrolet Astro
- 2005 Dodge Durango Limited 4x2 5L V8 Hemi

- 2016 Ford F-150 SCrew Lariat 4x2 3.5L V6 Ecoboost
chriscowles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2014, 08:50 PM   #19
Senior Member
 
VinceU's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 3,502
Quote:
Originally Posted by chriscowles View Post
So, if Al alloy are available and don't change the cathodic protection but offer some benefit with respect to taste and smell, it seems they might be better for RV applications? I draw that conclusion from the fact RV owners are exposed to a variety of water qualities, including smelly sulphur water. That assumes that Al alloy is sufficiently protective, even if not as protective as Mg.
Chris before you get too tangential, l let me just add a fellow camper in the resort we were in developed a horrible odor/taste at all his hot water outlets. I've never seen it this bad. I diagnosed it as bacteria in his hotwater tank. The unit was less than a year old but I'd see the problem in homes. Had him thoroughly flush the heater out then applied a 50/50 solution Of Chlorine bleach directly into the heater via the relief valve. Took two applications but the "bugs" were killed and heater resumed. Anodes have no relation to taste or smell, only bi-metal reactions.
__________________
VinceU is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2014, 10:15 AM   #20
Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 45
materials

A little zinc mixed in with the Al allows the zinc molecules to bond with sulphur (if present) and form zinc sulphide. This is a stronger bond than the hydrogen in H2O forming hydrogen sulphide. Personally, if I were at a campground with a strong sulphur smell in the water, I would move or get some bottled water. Above is correct in that the zinc might help sulphur in the water but not bacteria. That is a wholly different problem. I plan to look for magnesium and then buy aluminum if I cannot find Mg as a spare. Pure Al or Alloy Al about equal in my book. As long as you don't skip the maintenance and check that material is actually left, tank should last fine.
__________________

__________________
richl167 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
heater, hot water, water, water heater

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:29 PM.