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Old 11-11-2012, 11:09 PM   #1
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Hybrid Condensation...One more time

I've read the forums and know this is a subject discussed in length. Nevertheless, as a new Shamrock 23SS owner heading into the winter camping season, I thought sharing my experiences as well as getting feedback might be beneficial. I camp in the Susquehanna Valley, PA area. We use it for lodging when attending our daughter's college basketball games. Last year we made it through with a '01 Coleman Fairview PUP. Condensation was not an issue.
Season began this past Saturday and so we had our first camp. Night temps got down to high 40s. Used reflectix in canvas windows. Opened ceiling vent by door a couple of inches. We lost the battle with condensation. Bottom 6 inches of canvas wet with visable beads of water. Bed cover also wet near sides.
We return next Wed so plan to create more air flow by opening canvas windows slightly(hate to let in the cold air). Also looking into canvas covers.
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Old 11-12-2012, 01:29 AM   #2
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if you don't want the custom-sized Popup Gizmos, you can go the generic route with solar/sportsmen/all-weather blankets. these are available online and at REI, Cabela's, Bass Pro and Campmor.
they are 5x7 and will not fully cover the front bunk. they do have grommet holes that you can bungee or tie down. they run around $14.

we only have to open a corner of one of the tent end windows, along with a roof vent cracked open.
but we've also learned that, if you have electric hookups, a ceramic heater will cause less condensation, than the propane-fueled furnace.
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Old 11-12-2012, 06:44 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bikendan View Post
but we've also learned that, if you have electric hookups, a ceramic heater will cause less condensation, than the propane-fueled furnace.

Please explain why the use of a trailer furnace results in more condensation. This is totally new to me and I would sure like to know.
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Old 11-12-2012, 02:51 PM   #4
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i have read this many times on RV forums. i believe it has to do with the chemical process of firing of the propane, whereas a ceramic heater is an element that is heated by electricity.

here's a quote from a website:

"Heating,

Propane releases water vapor into the air, so electric heat is more conducive to keeping an RV dry. Electric conduction heaters are quiet and effective at taking the dampness out of the air. Propane heating should not be completely eliminated, however, since the furnace ducting reaches and heats areas under the RV that would otherwise not be heated."

in my experience, i can only say that we have had less condensation using our ceramic heater, than when we've had when using the furnace.
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Old 11-12-2012, 03:06 PM   #5
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From Wikipedia...

Properties and reactions:

Propane undergoes combustion reactions in a similar fashion to other alkanes. In the presence of excess oxygen, propane burns to form water and carbon dioxide.
C3H8 + 5 O2 → 3 CO2 + 4 H2O + heatpropane + oxygen → carbon dioxide + water

Releasing water vapor when using the propane stove for sure, less so when using the furnace as you're heating through a heat exchange, not direct heat from the flame.

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Old 11-14-2012, 08:24 AM   #6
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I always use our pop up gizmo covers and with those, I don't get condensation.
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Old 11-14-2012, 08:41 AM   #7
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I don't think that using the furnace would create more condensation than a electric heater. Yes burning propane does produce water vapors but the furnace is vented to the outside of the camper so the water vapors are released to the outdoors. If they were being released inside the camper you would die!
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Old 11-14-2012, 09:13 AM   #8
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What you might try are the damp out products. I used then when I owned a boat in the winter and you will be shocked at all the water that is taken out of the air.
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Old 11-14-2012, 11:18 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gljurczyk
What you might try are the damp out products. I used then when I owned a boat in the winter and you will be shocked at all the water that is taken out of the air.
X2. I like Damprid bags and buckets.
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Old 11-15-2012, 07:31 PM   #10
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Camped Wed night with temps falling to 28 degrees. 4 adults so both bunk ends used. Cooked dinner around 9:30pm using stove top with fan on. To combat condensation took the following measures: cracked all bunkend windows 3-4 inches, opened roof vent (fan off), opened front window slightly, and ran fans that attach to bunkend pole. Also covered bunkends with cheap tarp to avoid frost b/c I had to break camp by 7am.

Condensation on bottom 6 inches of bunkend canvass still present but much better then first camp. It was damp but no water droplets. Bedsheets/mattress not wet. I'm seeing improvement. Plan to purchase solar bunkend covers and hope that will elimate condensation issue altogether.

Next camp will be 11/28/12 for four nights.
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