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Old 04-12-2015, 10:52 PM   #1
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Roo 17 excessive condensation inside on bunk ends

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Has anyone ever experienced this before? The last 2 times we have use our Roo17, we have experienced significant amounts of condensation on each of the bunk ends.
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Old 04-12-2015, 11:00 PM   #2
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have you done a search on the topic?

because there are thousands of posts about tent end condensation on any of the many Hybrid forums.

are you using Popup Gizmos or the equivalent solar blankets? are you using Reflectix in the sides or windows of the tent ends. are you keeping a roof vent and tent end window cracked open to allow for air movement?

all three of these things will solve nearly all tent end condensation issues.

this also happens in popups.
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Old 04-12-2015, 11:24 PM   #3
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Condensation is common, but easily controlled. Depending on the number of people sleeping in the trailer, I find the following work well (in order):

-Vent cover open (Maxxair covers on vents for when it rains.)
-Unzip each bunk window at bit.
-PUGs (pop up gizmos), which are covers for each bunk.
-Run bathroom fan, creating a cross breeze.

We have five people and two dogs at night in our hybrid and that is a lot of moisture getting exhaled. It needs somewhere to go so anything that creates a cross breeze helps.
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Old 04-12-2015, 11:42 PM   #4
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All tt's have the issue it's just us htt and pup owners that feel the pain. When you see moisture building up on your windows, its creeping into your walls. Soaking into the laminate. Does you htt have the a/c on a different control? Like on the unit? You can run heat and cool at the same time (kind of like when you have the defroster running in your car). I just bought a moderate sized dehumidifier. De-winterized the camper today for our icebreaker voyage next weekend.
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Old 04-13-2015, 02:21 PM   #5
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Had the same problem with our popup. Solved it by putting a sheet between the bunk supports and the vinyl top. Don't remember if it eliminated the condensation or just blocked it from dripping.
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Old 04-14-2015, 11:39 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oakprk View Post
Had the same problem with our popup. Solved it by putting a sheet between the bunk supports and the vinyl top. Don't remember if it eliminated the condensation or just blocked it from dripping.
I did that in my pop up. I believe the sheet (or fleece blanket in my case) traps the moisture rising from the person sleeping underneath before it gets to the colder tent fabric.
This is the cheapest, easiest solution. Substitute it in Triguy's sequence in place of Gizmos.
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Old 04-14-2015, 12:05 PM   #7
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You will also get condensation under the mattress because the moisture from your body will penetrate the mattress and condense on the cold bed platform, When I had my PUP, I used the water proof self inflating thin camping pads under the mattress. It provided just enough insulation to keep the moisture from condensing. If you camp a lot in cold weather, it is a good idea to take the mattress out occasionally and air/dry it on a sunny day.
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Old 04-14-2015, 12:20 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Triguy View Post
Condensation is common, but easily controlled. Depending on the number of people sleeping in the trailer, I find the following work well (in order):

-Vent cover open (Maxxair covers on vents for when it rains.)
-Unzip each bunk window at bit.
-PUGs (pop up gizmos), which are covers for each bunk.
-Run bathroom fan, creating a cross breeze.

We have five people and two dogs at night in our hybrid and that is a lot of moisture getting exhaled. It needs somewhere to go so anything that creates a cross breeze helps.
I am in the process of developing a cheap RV HRV (Heat Recovery Ventilator) made out of some 1/4in Coroplast, a glue gun and a couple of computer fans. Should be less than $50 to make including a couple of helpful tools. Here is a pic of the first prototype. It will be designed to stick into a window and plugged into a 12 receptacle. The computer fans draw VERY little power on the order of a tenth of an amp.

The concept uses a cross flow core that allows the incoming dry fresh air to exchange heat with outgoing stale humid air and so reduces the heat loss. The prototypes seem to be about 75% efficient and allow a controlled inflow of air.

I will make a video of the construction as soon as I get all the kinks worked out, and post them on facebook and put a link here. May not get to it until later in the summer or fall, as it's primary use would be when it get cooler..

If anyone is interested in trying one out and reporting back on how they appear to work, I may make up a couple of them for evaluation. PM me if you are interested.
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Old 04-14-2015, 12:39 PM   #9
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I am in the process of developing a cheap RV HRV (Heat Recovery Ventilator) made out of some 1/4in Coroplast, a glue gun and a couple of computer fans....
That's phenomenal, garbonz

Ingenuity like this always amazes me. So, it will be powered through a 12V DC outlet?
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