Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-13-2015, 09:49 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 925
furnace use in the cold

I pulled the covers to find out what model furnace is in my 5er. I now know it is a 30,000btu unit and draws 5.5 amps, 66 watts per hour? I can see why people say the furnace can be rough on the batteries now.

My question is how hard is it on the propane? I would like to have an idea as to how long two 30 pound bottles will last when running the furnace. Sense trailers are not that well insulated I would imagine the furnace is going to run a fair amount.

Any one have any type of guide lines or hints?

Jim
__________________

__________________
07 Dodge 1500 crew cab with 20" wheels, 08 Forest River Rockwood Signature Ultra-lite 8280SS
"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man."
George Bernard Shaw
oldtool2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2015, 10:16 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 1,254
Propane has about 20,000 BTU/pound, in round numbers, so you can figure how long your tanks will last. The 30,000 BTU/hr furnace in our model 3100 Sunseeker runs about 50% of the time when it is really cold, say, freezing or below. If we are without an electrical hookup it will run a battery down overnight even if we spend most of the day away and only run it at night. With two batteries we would be pushing it to run through two nights without recharging. We've been in parks with restricted generator hours and were not in camp long enough during those hours to adequately recharge the batteries. The furnace quit about 10 pm. The lady of the RV was not happy.
__________________

__________________
RamblerGuy
2011 Sunseeker 3100
1997 Pathfinder Toad
RamblerGuy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2015, 09:25 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 925
Quote:
Originally Posted by RamblerGuy View Post
Propane has about 20,000 BTU/pound, in round numbers, so you can figure how long your tanks will last. The 30,000 BTU/hr furnace in our model 3100 Sunseeker runs about 50% of the time when it is really cold, say, freezing or below. If we are without an electrical hookup it will run a battery down overnight even if we spend most of the day away and only run it at night. With two batteries we would be pushing it to run through two nights without recharging. We've been in parks with restricted generator hours and were not in camp long enough during those hours to adequately recharge the batteries. The furnace quit about 10 pm. The lady of the RV was not happy.
So, if I figure right, two 30 pound tanks should last roughly 3.3 days if you don't use it for anything else. If you cook and run your hot water it might last 2 1/2 days.

Batteries are a different story. That would depend on size, how many you have and their condition. I don't understand why you could not charge the batteries back up with just a few hours of generator running. Were you charging thru the converter or did you use a separate charger? That could make a difference.

This is why I have been considering four 100 watt solar panels. That should maintain two 100AH batteries on half decent days from what I have been told.

Jim
__________________
07 Dodge 1500 crew cab with 20" wheels, 08 Forest River Rockwood Signature Ultra-lite 8280SS
"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man."
George Bernard Shaw
oldtool2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2015, 09:38 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
mud yapster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,162
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtool2 View Post
So, if I figure right, two 30 pound tanks should last roughly 3.3 days if you don't use it for anything else. If you cook and run your hot water it might last 2 1/2 days.

Batteries are a different story. That would depend on size, how many you have and their condition. I don't understand why you could not charge the batteries back up with just a few hours of generator running. Were you charging thru the converter or did you use a separate charger? That could make a difference.

This is why I have been considering four 100 watt solar panels. That should maintain two 100AH batteries on half decent days from what I have been told.

Jim
400 watts of solar will keep 200ah's of batteries charged no problem. Use a good MPPT charge controller for best performance of battery charging. I'd also install all LED light inside and outside your RV.

I have 520 watts of solar charging 435ah of AGM batteries and I run everything like I'm on shore power off the inverter 24/7 with no problems.
Microwave, coffee maker, 42" flat screen TV, central heater, stereo and surround sound with the TV, all LED lights inside and out, also run 30 feet of LED light strips under awnings, water pump, I do run the fridg and hot water tank off propane though. Boondocker's heaven with free electric so just camp anywhere you park.
__________________
2014 Palomino Columbus 3650TH
435AH 12V VMax Charge Tanks, 520 watt Monocrystilline Solar Array, Morningstar MPPT TS-60 CC,Morningstar Remote,Cotek True Sine Wave Inverter,Cotek Remote Controller,50amp Progressive Hardwire Surge Protector
2015 Dodge 3500 6.7L 4X4
2011 CanAm Commander XT 1000
mud yapster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2015, 11:33 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 925
Quote:
Originally Posted by mud yapster View Post
400 watts of solar will keep 200ah's of batteries charged no problem. Use a good MPPT charge controller for best performance of battery charging. I'd also install all LED light inside and outside your RV.

I have 520 watts of solar charging 435ah of AGM batteries and I run everything like I'm on shore power off the inverter 24/7 with no problems.
Microwave, coffee maker, 42" flat screen TV, central heater, stereo and surround sound with the TV, all LED lights inside and out, also run 30 feet of LED light strips under awnings, water pump, I do run the fridg and hot water tank off propane though. Boondocker's heaven with free electric so just camp anywhere you park.
I have two batteries. One is a less than year old large marine, the other is a 100ah AGM. Not sure of the age of the AGM but it holds a good charge and charges up well. Only have a 1000 watt pure sign inverter but all lights are LEDs. TV is a LED also. Will cook and make coffee with gas so should be OK. Fridge and HW would be on gas with HW only turned on when needed.

My concern was how well the propane and batteries will hold up if I used the furnace. I can add a third battery if needed. If I do and I add the solar I will be pushing with-in 100 pounds of the trailers weight limit. This would be with 20 gallons of water and propane tanks full.

Jim
__________________
07 Dodge 1500 crew cab with 20" wheels, 08 Forest River Rockwood Signature Ultra-lite 8280SS
"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man."
George Bernard Shaw
oldtool2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2015, 01:20 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 1,254
In response to the oldtool, I wasn't at the campsite during generator run allowed hours enough to keep my batteries charged. Also, that was our first long trip with our new motorhome, which is our first, and I underestimated the hours needed to fully recharge the batteries.

As for propane, cooking and the refrigerator use very little propane. Heating water doesn't use much. You can heat 5 or 6 tank fulls with one pound of propane.

To avoid having to find a place every few days to refill my coach tank during trips when I need heat, I use a grill gas tank and Extend - a - Stay kit. It's easy to drive the toad to a refill or exchange location with a grill gas tanks.
__________________
RamblerGuy
2011 Sunseeker 3100
1997 Pathfinder Toad
RamblerGuy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2015, 01:41 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Oaklevel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Virginia
Posts: 3,525
Everyone's usage will be different ....outside,temp, how warm it is kept inside, the size of camper, insulation factors.......etc...etc... We can usually go a week on a 30 lb bottle when using the furnace, but it is rarely below 32 degrees when we camp.


__________________

2005 Dodge 3500 Cummins
2013 Puma Unleashed 356 QLB
1966 Mustang GT
1986 Mustang SVO
Sadie & Lillie Spoiled Rotten Boxers
Oaklevel is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2015, 07:41 AM   #8
2016 Shamrock 183 Hybrid
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Solar Unfriendy Mid Michigan
Posts: 64
We installed a scandanavian fireplace below the roof vent in our bathroom; really saves on both propane and battery and gives us the added benefit of Saturday night sauna with the addition of just a couple of more logs.

Really!


Honest!



Nahhhh!



Heating and RV in cold weather just another example of the unexpected challenges of RV living.

Good luck!
__________________
sparty047 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2015, 08:39 AM   #9
Old Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 48
I had 33 foot Jayco that would go almost 3 weeks on a 30lb cyl in freezing weather. My 37 foot Everest had a terrible furnace placement and would barely go 3 days on a 30 lb cyl.

I would normally be on shore power but for those occasions with power failures, I would carry jumper cables.
__________________
Cool Canuck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2015, 08:55 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 925
Quote:
Originally Posted by RamblerGuy View Post
In response to the oldtool, I wasn't at the campsite during generator run allowed hours enough to keep my batteries charged. Also, that was our first long trip with our new motorhome, which is our first, and I underestimated the hours needed to fully recharge the batteries.

As for propane, cooking and the refrigerator use very little propane. Heating water doesn't use much. You can heat 5 or 6 tank fulls with one pound of propane.

To avoid having to find a place every few days to refill my coach tank during trips when I need heat, I use a grill gas tank and Extend - a - Stay kit. It's easy to drive the toad to a refill or exchange location with a grill gas tanks.
We live and learn. I have a few weeks before I am going to be able to take my 5er out so plan on doing some playing to see how long it will take to charge my batteries. I have a portable charger as well as the converter I can charge with. Want to know roughly how long things will take. Might not need to take the portable with me.

I know the fridge, cooking and HW won't use much gas but figured I would mention them. The biggest of the three is HW and sense it is just the dog and I it doesn't get much use. I am glad you mentioned the 20 pounder. I carry one for my outside grill I could use if needed. I hadn't given hooking up that tank a thought. Will need to look and see what is needed to hook it up if anything. Hopefully the hose is long enough.

Jim
__________________

__________________
07 Dodge 1500 crew cab with 20" wheels, 08 Forest River Rockwood Signature Ultra-lite 8280SS
"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man."
George Bernard Shaw
oldtool2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
furnace

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:25 PM.