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Old 04-20-2011, 11:59 PM   #21
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With "Mystery Smoke" I would pull the housing completely off the ceiling and inspect the wires behind it. I suspect its some kind of residual oil or film burning off like the others. Remember a Fuses purpose isnt just to prevent components from being damaged, it is also to prevent electrical fires by blowing before the wires behind it over heat and catch fire. With your lights running 5-10m, see if those wires are getting hot.
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Old 04-21-2011, 07:39 AM   #22
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Remember a Fuses purpose isnt just to prevent components from being damaged, it is also to prevent electrical fires by blowing before the wires behind it over heat and catch fire.
Yes, that makes total sense. The house wiring circuit protection is set for the size of the supply wire, not what is plugged into it. A 15 AMP circuit does not care whether you have a 12 amp heater or a .2 amp phone charger plugged in.
I totally forgot that.
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Old 04-21-2011, 10:07 AM   #23
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On the fuse issue, I'm considering fusing each fixture with an in-line miniature blade type of fuse, depending what other usage is on the same circuit (ie; I just added a Fantastic Fan and took the power from one of my ceiling fixtures). Plenty of room in the lens and very simple to install/change.
that would be the proper way to do it. ur tv has its own protection. u fuze the component.

when i was going to wire the long runs in my home with #10 then reduce to #12 at the end of the line, the inspector wouldn't buy it. even though i was going to fuse for #12 (20A). he explained that there would not be an actual problem but if i sold the house and the breaker started kicking off, and electrician would see #10 and assume that the problem was the undersized breaker. he would install the 30A then the problems would begin. he said that the fuse was to protect the wire not the components.
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Old 04-21-2011, 10:51 AM   #24
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Isn't that what I said in reply #6, "The fuse or circuit breaker is actually put in to protect the wiring, because it often runs in walls and under floors, where it could start a fire that would be undetected for a while, or until it is too late."
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Old 04-21-2011, 11:45 AM   #25
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part of it was in 6 the other was in 22. seems to be a lot of agreement on that part.
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Old 04-21-2011, 01:10 PM   #26
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Statement above is true. The size of the fuse is determined by the size of the wire.
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Old 04-21-2011, 09:53 PM   #27
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Just the facts and nothing but the facts.

Just the facts and nothing but the facts.

I think everyone is missing something in the very 1st message.
"The LED shorted out internally and caught fire"

If you have a short on any DC circuit + to - that is called a direct short and WILL instantaniously blow the fuse. The reason I can state this as a fact is because amperage on that circuit will go up instantiously to the maximum battery capacity. I am 100% sure this will blow any type of fuse very quickly.

Now the original statement says the LED shorted out internally and caught fire. I believe something got too hot and caught fire. In that statement the word Short Circuit shouldn't be used becasue if it did short circuit the power source it would have blown the fuse instantaniously.
No matter what the service guy said that he saved your rig by quickly disconnecting the battery didn't solve anything except to remove 12 volt battery power to the rig.

Now I'm speaking with over 42 years in the electrical and electronic career fields. I'm sure someone will want to chanllenge what I have said but you better do your homework before jumping in and writing non-factual information.
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Old 04-22-2011, 01:07 AM   #28
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I agree with Iggy. Read reply #6, again. Also this being a marker lamp, on the outside of the vehicle, once the LED caught fire, if it did, what was it going to burn? The outside of the van is metal.

My last thought, and I'm done with this thread. In your house, you have an outlet in the bathroom, and you have a 12 watt nightlight. It pulls one tenth of an amp, so you need a a 1 amp fuse or breaker. Now you get up in the morning, take a shower, and plug in your 1500 watt hair dryer, requiring 12 amps. Do you go and change the fuse or breaker because the current load on the circuit has changed? I rest my case, enuff said.
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Old 04-22-2011, 03:07 AM   #29
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A couple of other points to ponder;

1) I didn't take the original post literally. I've never heard of an LED shorting internally. Something on/in the circuit perhaps, or connector perhaps, but not an LED. It would probably be more apt to open before it caused something (itself) to ignite.

2) If you'll look closely at the picture of my fixture, you'll see that the leads that came with the LED device are 24-26 gauge at best. That's where the insulation could potentially overheat and melt, or worse, before a 15amp fuse (protecting the 14ga wire) would come into play. That would be the reason for a smaller, dedicated in-line fuse within the fixture..... in my case.

I believe Iggy is correct I his assumption:
Quote:
I believe something got too hot and caught fire. In that statement the word Short Circuit shouldn't be used becasue if it did short circuit the power source it would have blown the fuse instantaniously
.

Still very curious, and excepting knowledgeable input!
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