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Old 10-13-2016, 12:11 PM   #1
30+ year RV'er
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Manassas, VA
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Mod: Using existing Cable TV jack for Satellite

Over the years I have come across many campers that are frustrated because they have a portable satellite dish antenna, but their camper has only a “Cable TV” input located on the camper exterior. Of course, you cannot use a “Cable TV” jack for sending the signal from the portable satellite dish antenna to inside the camper – or can you? Well with a fairly simple modification you can maintain your cable-ready capability - while adding the ability to use it for a portable satellite dish antenna feed (just not at the same time). I am a retired RF professional, and offer this modification to this community because those that need it, really appreciate it! But no warranty or guarantees are expressed or implied, and any modification is done at your own risk.

As an overview, the frequencies used by a cable TV service are below 1 gigahertz (GHz). The frequencies used between the portable satellite dish antenna and the satellite receiver service are above 1 GHz. So what is needed is a device (called a diplexer) that separates the two services just before the coaxial cable from the outside connects to the antenna booster on the inside. Once separated, the cable service signal is reattached to the antenna booster and works as it did before, and the satellite dish antenna service goes to a new wall jack to which you can connect your satellite receiver. Result: if you plug in the park’s cable, it works just like it did before the modification; and, if you plug in your dish, it is available at the new jack (that you mark satellite). However, doing this requires removing/reinstalling the antenna booster, adding short cables, drilling a 5/8” hole, and installing a new coax jack plate. If you are not comfortable with this level of modification, stop here!

The supplies listed below are from Solid Signal with a parts cost of about $15. There are other places to purchase these supplies, but be sure they meet satellite signal specifications. I selected Solid Signal because it carries everything needed.

Step 1. Purchase the following items that can be found at SolidSignal.com or other sources:
(A) Quantity One: Pico Digital Custom Pre-Assembled Coaxial Cable Jumpers - Six Inch (JRG6C-6) P\N: JRG6C-6

(B) Quantity One: Pico Digital Custom Pre-Assembled Coaxial Cable Jumpers - 1ft (JRG6C-12) P\N: JRG6C-12

(C) Quantity One: Skywalker Signature Series SKY05091I Wall Plate w/single 3.0ghz F-81 Ivory* (SKY05091I) P\N: SKY05091I * As a BROWN alternative to the above, check Amazon: Datacomm 32-2024-BR 2.4 GHz Coax Wall Plate (Brown)

(D) Quantity One: Holland DPD2 Diplexer Dual Satellite Dish TV Antenna Combiner (DPD2) P\N: DPD2

(E) Quantity One: Sonora Male to Female F-Right Angle 5-Pack (HRF90-5PK) P\N: HRF90-5PK

Step 2. Disconnect the 12v fuse that powers the antenna booster and confirm that with the antenna booster on, the pilot light goes out when the fuse is pulled.

Step 3. Remove the antenna booster from the wall by removing the screws and carefully tilting the top out and lifting the unit up and cables away from the wall.

Step 4. Looking from the back of the of the antenna booster, identify the connection marked “Cable”. Typically there are three connections: Antenna; Cable; and, Set 2. The “Cable” connection is often the one in the center – but the PC board is marked, or the pigtails, depending on the model of your booster.

Step 5. Remove the coax from the “Cable” connection and attach it to the Holland DPD2 Diplexer port marked “IN/OUT” (it’s the side with only one connector).

Step 6. Attach one end of the 6” Pre-Assembled Coaxial Cable Jumper to the Holland DPD2 Diplexer port marked “VHF/UHF”. Attach the other end of the 6” Pre-Assembled Coaxial Cable Jumper to the “Cable” connector on the antenna booster. Result: You now have the original cable from the outside connected to the Holland input, and the Holland VHF/UHF output goes through the 6” coax back to where the original cable was connected to the antenna booster.

Step 7. Attach the 12” Pre-Assembled Coaxial Cable Jumper to the Holland DPD2 Diplexer port marked “SAT”.

Step 8. Locate where you want to have your new wall plate. It needs to be close enough to the antenna booster wall plate that the 12” cable jumper can reach it. If you want it further away, then you will need a longer satellite-rated RG-6 cable to replace the 12” cable jumper. Make sure there are no wires or obstructions where you plan to mount the new wall plate. The new wall plate will eventually be connected to the Holland DPD2 Diplexer, so make sure there are no obstructions blocking where this cable will go.

Step 9. Carefully drill a 5/8” hole in the CENTER of where the wall plate will be mounted. The new wall jack’s connector will fit through this hole.

Step 10. Fish the unconnected end of the 12” cable jumper through the antenna booster plate cut out (hole) and back through the 5/8” hole you just drilled. Attach the 12” cable jumper to the back side of the new wall plate connector. Result: The 12" cable jumper connects from the Holland "SAT" port, in through the antenna booster hole, out through the new wall plate hole, and connects to the back of the new wall plate. Installation Tip: Use a satellite-rated right angle connector (E above) on the back of the wall plate connector to allow for a flush fit in narrow wall cavities.

Step 11. Verify all cable connections are snug. Do not overtighten.

Step 12. Carefully work the Holland DPD2 Diplexer and cables down through the antenna booster cut out (hole). Follow this with carefully working the antenna booster unit back into its original wall mount position. Take your time – these are typically tight quarters and it may take several tries to work the extra cables back into the wall space.

Step 13. Carefully work the new wall jack and cable so that the cable goes through the 5/8” hole and the new wall plate fits snug against the wall. Use two short wood screws to keep the plate snug against the wall – be careful that the wood screws do not damage cables or other items behind the wall.

Step 14. Reinstall the fuse and verify the antenna booster pilot light comes on when activated.

All Done! If done properly, when you plug in your portable satellite dish antenna into the outside “Cable TV” jack, the signal will be sent to the new wall jack you labeled “Satellite”. The Cable and Antenna work as they always did. Enjoy.
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Old 10-13-2016, 12:19 PM   #2
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Good info
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Old 10-13-2016, 12:21 PM   #3
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Should be a 'sticky', as a lot of folks have a problem hook'n up ....
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Old 10-13-2016, 12:52 PM   #4
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That is a great solution, the magic is the diplexer. For some of us who have a switchbox, the solution is even easier. Disconnect the "cable" connection from the switchbox and connect it to the "in" on the diplexer. Connect the "sat" on the diplexer to the satellite receiver and the "uhf/vhf" to the switchbox marked cable. Run a coax from the satellite receiver "out to TV" to the switchbox "satellite" connection...and you are done!
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Old 10-13-2016, 01:43 PM   #5
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Smile Great Stuff!

Sounds like a great solution for using my ShawDirect PVR satellite receiver and thus being able to watch one channel while recording another. In the past I have had to mount a second coax connection on the outside and inside of the trailer. At least now (with our brand new trailer), using your method, I will not require an additional connection on the outside. Thanks from Canada

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Old 10-13-2016, 01:49 PM   #6
Dahagen
 
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Cable TV jack?

Question.....Why do you have an antenna booster on the 'cable tv' jack on the side of your RV? The antenna booster should be on the roof antenna.
For me to use the cable tv jack on my older motorhome with satellite, I simply had to change the splitter on the cable tv line to a splitter designed for satellite. The old splitter didn't let the power needed for satellite to flow to the dish and back.
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Old 10-13-2016, 01:56 PM   #7
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You can just change out the splitter to this:
cable splitter to use with satellite antenna - 5mhz-2.3ghz - Ideal brand model #85-333
Available at the big box stores for $7. As Dahagen said the old splitter will not allow the 12V to pass needed for the dish to operate.
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Old 10-13-2016, 02:04 PM   #8
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So I have done some work in really big Sat's. We use Cat 6 coaxial wire. So my question is; if I have existing Cat 6 coaxial marked as cable, why can't I just use that for my cable. I don't see us using cable and sat at the same time.
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Old 10-13-2016, 02:13 PM   #9
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You can, if there's not a splitter in cable for another tv....cable TV splitter will block signal
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Old 10-13-2016, 02:57 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hyseas View Post
Over the years I have come across many campers that are frustrated because they have a portable satellite dish antenna, but their camper has only a “Cable TV” input located on the camper exterior. Of course, you cannot use a “Cable TV” jack for sending the signal from the portable satellite dish antenna to inside the camper – or can you? Well with a fairly simple modification you can maintain your cable-ready capability - while adding the ability to use it for a portable satellite dish antenna feed (just not at the same time). I am a retired RF professional, and offer this modification to this community because those that need it, really appreciate it! But no warranty or guarantees are expressed or implied, and any modification is done at your own risk.

As an overview, the frequencies used by a cable TV service are below 1 gigahertz (GHz). The frequencies used between the portable satellite dish antenna and the satellite receiver service are above 1 GHz. So what is needed is a device (called a diplexer) that separates the two services just before the coaxial cable from the outside connects to the antenna booster on the inside. Once separated, the cable service signal is reattached to the antenna booster and works as it did before, and the satellite dish antenna service goes to a new wall jack to which you can connect your satellite receiver. Result: if you plug in the park’s cable, it works just like it did before the modification; and, if you plug in your dish, it is available at the new jack (that you mark satellite). However, doing this requires removing/reinstalling the antenna booster, adding short cables, drilling a 5/8” hole, and installing a new coax jack plate. If you are not comfortable with this level of modification, stop here!

The supplies listed below are from Solid Signal with a parts cost of about $15. There are other places to purchase these supplies, but be sure they meet satellite signal specifications. I selected Solid Signal because it carries everything needed.

Step 1. Purchase the following items that can be found at SolidSignal.com or other sources:
(A) Quantity One: Pico Digital Custom Pre-Assembled Coaxial Cable Jumpers - Six Inch (JRG6C-6) P\N: JRG6C-6

(B) Quantity One: Pico Digital Custom Pre-Assembled Coaxial Cable Jumpers - 1ft (JRG6C-12) P\N: JRG6C-12

(C) Quantity One: Skywalker Signature Series SKY05091I Wall Plate w/single 3.0ghz F-81 Ivory* (SKY05091I) P\N: SKY05091I * As a BROWN alternative to the above, check Amazon: Datacomm 32-2024-BR 2.4 GHz Coax Wall Plate (Brown)

(D) Quantity One: Holland DPD2 Diplexer Dual Satellite Dish TV Antenna Combiner (DPD2) P\N: DPD2

(E) Quantity One: Sonora Male to Female F-Right Angle 5-Pack (HRF90-5PK) P\N: HRF90-5PK

Step 2. Disconnect the 12v fuse that powers the antenna booster and confirm that with the antenna booster on, the pilot light goes out when the fuse is pulled.

Step 3. Remove the antenna booster from the wall by removing the screws and carefully tilting the top out and lifting the unit up and cables away from the wall.

Step 4. Looking from the back of the of the antenna booster, identify the connection marked “Cable”. Typically there are three connections: Antenna; Cable; and, Set 2. The “Cable” connection is often the one in the center – but the PC board is marked, or the pigtails, depending on the model of your booster.

Step 5. Remove the coax from the “Cable” connection and attach it to the Holland DPD2 Diplexer port marked “IN/OUT” (it’s the side with only one connector).

Step 6. Attach one end of the 6” Pre-Assembled Coaxial Cable Jumper to the Holland DPD2 Diplexer port marked “VHF/UHF”. Attach the other end of the 6” Pre-Assembled Coaxial Cable Jumper to the “Cable” connector on the antenna booster. Result: You now have the original cable from the outside connected to the Holland input, and the Holland VHF/UHF output goes through the 6” coax back to where the original cable was connected to the antenna booster.

Step 7. Attach the 12” Pre-Assembled Coaxial Cable Jumper to the Holland DPD2 Diplexer port marked “SAT”.

Step 8. Locate where you want to have your new wall plate. It needs to be close enough to the antenna booster wall plate that the 12” cable jumper can reach it. If you want it further away, then you will need a longer satellite-rated RG-6 cable to replace the 12” cable jumper. Make sure there are no wires or obstructions where you plan to mount the new wall plate. The new wall plate will eventually be connected to the Holland DPD2 Diplexer, so make sure there are no obstructions blocking where this cable will go.

Step 9. Carefully drill a 5/8” hole in the CENTER of where the wall plate will be mounted. The new wall jack’s connector will fit through this hole.

Step 10. Fish the unconnected end of the 12” cable jumper through the antenna booster plate cut out (hole) and back through the 5/8” hole you just drilled. Attach the 12” cable jumper to the back side of the new wall plate connector. Result: The 12" cable jumper connects from the Holland "SAT" port, in through the antenna booster hole, out through the new wall plate hole, and connects to the back of the new wall plate. Installation Tip: Use a satellite-rated right angle connector (E above) on the back of the wall plate connector to allow for a flush fit in narrow wall cavities.

Step 11. Verify all cable connections are snug. Do not overtighten.

Step 12. Carefully work the Holland DPD2 Diplexer and cables down through the antenna booster cut out (hole). Follow this with carefully working the antenna booster unit back into its original wall mount position. Take your time – these are typically tight quarters and it may take several tries to work the extra cables back into the wall space.

Step 13. Carefully work the new wall jack and cable so that the cable goes through the 5/8” hole and the new wall plate fits snug against the wall. Use two short wood screws to keep the plate snug against the wall – be careful that the wood screws do not damage cables or other items behind the wall.

Step 14. Reinstall the fuse and verify the antenna booster pilot light comes on when activated.

All Done! If done properly, when you plug in your portable satellite dish antenna into the outside “Cable TV” jack, the signal will be sent to the new wall jack you labeled “Satellite”. The Cable and Antenna work as they always did. Enjoy.
Wait a minute. You guys move WAY too fast for me. I know it's a lot to ask...but could you please throw in some pictures??? 14 steps and not a single picture. Maybe they are simple steps to you, but not to me. I might be willing to give this a shot. But without some visual reference, I get lost pretty quick. Sorry to be such a pain in the arse, but I'm one of those people that don't get it until I can see a picture of it.

hatchet
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