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Old 09-13-2015, 09:02 PM   #11
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Do make sure that you put a box, ANY BOX, under your cut. It is't just styrofoam, hehe. And don't get in it. It is VERY scratchy. Lesson learned here, don't be a sloppy cook like your momma taught you.

Get a file, you'll need it. For some reason I chose my cheapest jig saw with the just any old blade that was in it. You'll want a finer metal cutting, stiff blade to slide against the wood and metal of the opening frame. Go slow, keep the base of the tool solidly on the roof, don't let a tear in the metal of the roof or the ceiling split away from the opening like I almost did but cleaned up with a file. Use the file to file off where it's not clean, don't take another go with the saw. I went inside the pup with the roof partly up and filed the opening clean. But wear sleeves or your arms will feel scratchy when you type.
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Old 09-13-2015, 09:09 PM   #12
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Same thing with all other work at dealer service, everywhere ....
When somebody wrote that dealer asking $1000.00 for base plate installation (Smart for two ), I was,
WOW.
I did by myself for less than 3 hours
efective work .....!!!!
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Old 09-13-2015, 09:11 PM   #13
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Go up to the wood braces at a shallow angle until you find them. On my pup the inside one was less than an inch from the center seam.

You don't need to remove the screw to drill a hole, heh.

Steve's instructions are about the most comprehensive I've seen on the Tubes.

Thank You Steve, more to come.

FYI, I am doing a Dometic Brisk Aire II 15000 btu for Texas Gulf Coast weather. I am installing a thermostat that I'll move around to different mounts. So a little more wiring to do. I'm also keeping the wiring inside, as I'm fairly sure that AC use will be standard, even if just to remove humidity, which the thermostat will also help with.
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Old 09-13-2015, 10:08 PM   #14
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If you don't use a box, and then proceed to play in the 'styrofoam', don't wipe your arms when cleaning them off. Wash them off with a cool, not warm, water stream for a few minutes. rubbing only rubs the fibers in deeper, they're actually tiny glass shards!

On second thought, don't file from below. Also, file into the hole, not outwards, so you don't pull the metal sheet away from the framing.
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Old 09-13-2015, 11:15 PM   #15
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nope perfectly normal. The Forest River pop ups all seem to exhibit this issue where the roof has a tendency to "dish" in slightly. I doubt that you're 220 lbs plus the a/c did any appreciable damage. This is not to say that I would be walking on your roof all the time but I'm sure you're fine. Remember those steel support braces aren't that thick so any weight of any sort will cause them to flex a bit.

I am sure you're perfectly fine.
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Old 09-15-2015, 12:07 AM   #16
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Nice video excellent job with the install


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Old 09-15-2015, 01:20 AM   #17
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Iceblaze580 - thanks for the compliments

FlagMac227 has some very valid points in how he's been tackling his pop up. Very excited and glad to see those watching my tutorial greatly appreciate it.
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Old 09-15-2015, 04:37 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stevespopup View Post
$175/ hour is the average RV tech rate in my city and when I was told it would cost me $600 in labor I knew that I would have to tackle this on my own.
Ya, that's just nuts. Even worse here in Oilberta even though the oil is headed for a trickle.

Very nice vid. Hat's off!

BTW... an inch-pound torque wrench is not hard to find and the better ones are very accurate - some down to 10 inch-pounds.

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Old 09-15-2015, 06:50 PM   #19
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I bought the wiring today and did a test of the AC and my wiring configuration. Details to follow, but a quick summary, I went with some very flexible 10/3 and 16/3 (x 2 lengths for thermostat, furnace, and generator start) because I am hard wiring it inside the pup. So it needs to supple braided wire to rise up and down without kink issues. That along with telephone wiring and a port to plug the comfort control thermostat in to and have it be mobile to where someone is. Some in the family are temperature sensitive, so this sensor mobility will increase comfort.
It's interesting that I am having a difficult time getting electronic control box mounting instructions (the kind I know would be labelled "OEM only installation" instructions) even though I can buy complete kits from anyone. This information is like a trade secret. Manuals did not come with any of the components for a thermostat install. I'm going to wait another day to try for responses from Dometic, and finish off the rest of the pup wiring while I wait.
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Old 09-15-2015, 07:00 PM   #20
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I also went with the 10/3 instead of 12/3 because of a tip I got from an electrician about AC wiring in general. That the reason so many people trip breakers on their home even if it's a proper 20 AMP is because wiring capacity is usually 80% of the home breaker. When you have multiple connections, from the AC through different plugs, different cords, an extension cord, an adapter, etc. , every bit of it adds to the resistance. The run I am making in the pup is 25 feet.
Contrary to the intuitive way one would think it works, electricity isn't blocked by resistance, rather it causes the device to pull harder for power. So the more resistance added up over a run, even over "adequate" cabling and proper plugs, the more amps are drawn for the power need. Until the breaker trips (or another weaker link goes if lines are bad enough, but there it might not be a clean break but instead an arc, often in the device itself, like an ac compressor). So increasing the wiring size, even in just one section, can help just enough.
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