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Old 08-29-2018, 11:16 AM   #1
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Loading Harley into Vengeance toy hauler

After reading multiple opinions on multiple boards, I finally came up with a cheap solution that has worked perfectly many times now for my Ultra Limited. I bought the motorcycle wheel chock from Harbor Freight for around $50. I also bought 7 cargo straps. Here is why. I did not want to drill holes in my floor, so I use two straps from the rear floor hooks to the wheel chock that is placed forward in the garage area. This keeps the wheel chock from moving forward during transport. I then load the bike into it, which is no problem because the two straps keep it from sliding forward when driving onto it.
Two more straps go from the front floor hooks to the passenger running board bar, or any other secure point to the rear of your bike....this keeps the bike from moving backwards during transport. Now we have forward and backward movement controlled. Two more straps go on each side and hook to the middle floor hooks, this keeps the bike from moving left or right during turns. The final strap I place around the upper base of the wheel chock and through the front wheel of the bike to secure it to the wheel chock...this prevents any minor movement and is an extra safety in case a strap breaks.
This has worked great and after many trips through the mountains and stop and go city driving, I only had one issue when a side strap somehow came loose. Due to all the other straps there was never any danger of the bike going anywhere. After a couple of times and getting used to the procedure, it takes me about 10 minutes to load the bike myself. The great advantage is that when I get to my campsite I can store the wheel chock out of the way until I need it again. Safe travels!
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Old 08-29-2018, 05:22 PM   #2
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Grywolf 26rr

We have a Graywolf 26rr that we haul our Harley Ultra with. I opted to bolt my wheel chock to the floor. I just felt that in a sudden stop, straps alone may not be good enough. Very easy to remove once we get to our destination. I also bolted 4 retractable straps to the floor to secure the bike. Makes loading & unloading the bike super easy & quick.
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Old 08-29-2018, 07:41 PM   #3
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As long as you found a way that works for you. I REALLY didnít want to drill holes in my new RV. With the middle straps in place, I have 4 straps holding in each direction. My thought is that the force required to break all four would result in much more worries for me than the condition of my bike or toy hauler.
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Old 08-29-2018, 07:56 PM   #4
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D ring failure

Its all about personal preference & your own comfort level.
I will however reference this thread--- Wolf Pack Cherokee D-Ring failer
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Old 08-29-2018, 08:38 PM   #5
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OUCH....definitely concerning. Kills me how they put cheap parts on a 50G or more trailer, especially when safety is involved. Those looked awfully thin and the bracket doesnt have nearly enough screws securing it. Luckily, one of the few good things about my Vengeance is the heavy duty tie down brackets...I thought they were the norm on all Forest River toy haulers, but Iím learning that there is no such thing as normal when it comes to their RVs. Safe travels!
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Old 08-30-2018, 07:40 AM   #6
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I also use the Harbor Freight wheel chock on my 600+ lb adventure bike in my Stealth. I did not want to bolt the chock down, so I have tie down straps from the side of the chock to the D-rings on either side to prevent side to side movement. I tie down the front on either side with straps from the triple clamp to the D-rings and on the rear, straps through the passenger hand holds to the rear D-rings. That has worked for about 20K miles so far.

What I am finding now, is with the thinner metal used on the D-rings, they are being pulled up from when the bike bounces (bike is cinched down to about 1/3 -1/2 of travel). I am currently putting a third screw in the middle of the D-ring to stop that.

I am also fixing one of the D-rings that the dealer "fixed" after it pulled out on the first trip with the bike. Seems the factory "missed" the crossmember when putting the screws in, and the D-ring was only screwed to the wood floor. Didn't last and the dealer as their fix was to put a small strip of 3/32" metal that was barely longer then the screw holes. I had to go to oversized screws, but the ring is now secured into the crossmember like it was suppose to.
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Old 08-30-2018, 09:15 AM   #7
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Seems like the D-rings vary trailer to trailer. The link that wolf sent was concerning in that those rings looked cheap & flimsy. My 2017 Vengeance came with the square bracket that has 4 screws per and a heavy duty ring. There are 9 of these in my garage area. I also noticed in the pic that Wolf sent that the floor was wood. Mine came with the hard rubber flooring....I thought that was standard on all their toy haulers. I do inspect my d-rings fairly often and have, so far, not noticed any issues. My problem is finding straps that can handle the load of my Harley. Itís around 800lbs and a few times I have noticed one of the straps showing wear or the locking mechanism spring distorted. I tried to upload a pic of my d-rings, but not really sure how to do this.
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Old 08-30-2018, 09:22 AM   #8
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Figured it out. 😄
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Old 08-30-2018, 01:00 PM   #9
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more pictures please
that is easier than trying to picture it in my head lol
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Old 08-30-2018, 01:33 PM   #10
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I have used a Harbor Freight chock for the last 5 years and have no issues. I use 5 straps. I double up in the front and one thru the rear tire so no side to side bounce. I also use 2 on the floor to keep the chock from moving forward. Loaded it many times by myself with no problems.
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Old 08-30-2018, 02:19 PM   #11
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I bought the big heavy Baxley wheel chock. After a lot of research I wanted to buy the biggest, bestest wheel chock I could find...lol. I also figured with a nice big chock I wouldn't need to drill and anchor it to the floor. I can also use the chock in the garage for service on the bike which is pretty handy. I am using 4 straps, one at each corner, to keep it in place. I added the HD tie down brackets to the bike for an easy tie down point up front. I have loaded and unloaded it by myself both times I have used it now without any trouble. The first time is a little nerve wracking.
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Old 08-30-2018, 03:25 PM   #12
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Expensive but Permanent Fix for HD Tie Down

Guys,

This is the premium fix to tie down your bike. Last winter I drove to Southern California and back to Pittsburgh. Over 7,000 miles. I kept checking the garage to make sure the bike didn't fall especially around the hills of Western Pa and West Virginia.
The bike stayed right in place like a bit of magic because you can hardly see the "Biker Bar" holding it in place. No more strapped or storing a chock. You need to drill 2 holes and will need to use a creeper one time to attach the plates under the floor.
After that you can unscrew just 2 bolts from inside the garage (15/16 socket) if you really need to remove it. Also will not damage the suspension in the fork by over compressing.
Check your clearance from the garage door hinge to your bike frame as it goes into the garage. One of my bikes has a low clearance son I drive the bike in, block it, then attach the bar and push it forward into the locking jaws.
Ride safe!

Link: https://www.google.com/search?q=bike...hrome&ie=UTF-8
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Old 08-30-2018, 04:04 PM   #13
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Muddyrode....Iíll be loading it again in a couple of weeks and will take some snaps, but basically:
1. One strap each side of wheel chock to right and left rear D-rings. The wheel chock from Harbor Freight has connectors to attach to on each side.
2. One strap each side of rear area of bike to left and right front D-rings. I use the bars holding the passenger footboards on.
3. One strap each side of bike to left and right center D-ring...once again, I use the passenger footboard bars.
4. One strap around the top part of wheelchock where the wheel is touching, through the front wheel..basically just extra securing the bike to the wheelchock so no small movement.
5. As one extra protection, really not needed but I worry too much, one strap from left center D-ring, over the bike, to the right center D-ring.

The HF wheelchock has rubber where it touches the ground...along with the weight of the chock & my bike, and the rubber flooring..I canít slide it when no straps are on it. With the straps, it doesnít move at all during transport. I havenít researched the best wheelchocks so others may have better suggestions. I merely went with the HF one because I had use one in my garage and liked it...and it was cheap, around $55 or so. Some may have better ideas, this was just my experience from one that does not want to drill holes and has tried several different methods that failed. Good luck and safe travels!
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Old 08-30-2018, 07:02 PM   #14
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My setup

Chock bolted to floor
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Old 08-30-2018, 07:57 PM   #15
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Nice bike.
If one wants to drill holes and bolt to the floor, not many ways to really go wrong. I was merely offering a solution that doesn’t require holes to be drilled. I have tried several different straps only scenarios, all to questionable success. After many mistakes, I found a way to do it with a cheap chock and no drilling...something I looked for online for quite a while with no success. If you’re a bolting is best person, then this doesn’t really apply to you. Your setup works great and seems to be exactly what you wanted...but not everyone has a desire to drill. With straps only and a non drilled chock, I also have the option of placing my bike on the left, in the center, or on the right, or more forward or more toward the rear, depending on what load I happen to be carrying back there with it..or if I want to have a second bike...I’m not forced to place it were the drill holes are...and no, I have no intention of drilling three or more separate sets of holes.
Happy travels and ride safe.
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Old 08-31-2018, 08:52 AM   #16
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If my trailer was long enough to have a dedicated garage, I would bolt the wheel chock to the floor, which is the best system. I would use some kind of quick disconnect system if possible. But with the living area also the garage, being able to get "rid" of the chock, and only have the minor bumps of the D-rings is preferred when the bike is not in the trailer.
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Old 09-05-2018, 09:22 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cltskybear View Post
Seems like the D-rings vary trailer to trailer. The link that wolf sent was concerning in that those rings looked cheap & flimsy. My 2017 Vengeance came with the square bracket that has 4 screws per and a heavy duty ring. There are 9 of these in my garage area. I also noticed in the pic that Wolf sent that the floor was wood. Mine came with the hard rubber flooring....I thought that was standard on all their toy haulers. I do inspect my d-rings fairly often and have, so far, not noticed any issues. My problem is finding straps that can handle the load of my Harley. Itís around 800lbs and a few times I have noticed one of the straps showing wear or the locking mechanism spring distorted. I tried to upload a pic of my d-rings, but not really sure how to do this.


I have the cheaper d rings and plan to do something to improve them before desert season. I guess my concern with your d rings might be the small screws attaching them to the floor? Do they screw into wood or metal? They look like small wood screws to me. But I may be wrong.
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Old 09-05-2018, 11:16 AM   #18
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I havenít backed the screws out to see how long they are. My garage has the hard rubber cover on it and, as you can see, the D-rings are sunken. I can only report that I have traveled with the Harley in the back for around 10K miles, mostly TN mountain area. I have never noticed an issue with the D-rings. On the other hand, as I tried different setups to figure out the best way, I have broken a few straps and even had one come loose when I hit a large bump and the bike leaned over. This was before I purchased the wheel chock. Luckily, I had so much gear in the back and had slid a couple bags under the bike and it was merely leaning on them. I knew then that some sort of wheel chock was required to haul my bike safely. Since I have employed the wheel chock/strap method, I have noticed zero movement or loosening of the straps. Some may prefer to drill for the wheelchock and thatís fine too. This setup works great for my trailer and my bike, it may not work for everyone. My bike is around 800 lbs and my trailer has 9 heavy duty D-rings and I use 7 straps total. I tighten them down just enough to stop movement, with 7 straps, I have double protection in each direction. Smarter people than me can probably do it with 3 or 4 straps. Good luck!
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