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Old 01-29-2012, 07:04 AM   #1
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Fire Starters using lint

I got many people hooked on starting their fires using dryer lint. It start right away and you have a great fire in no time at all. Just have your wifes place the lint from your dryer's in a plastic bag. When you camping, grab your bag and give it a shot. You will be hooked also. Enjoy
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Old 01-29-2012, 09:24 AM   #2
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I'll be trying this come spring. I should have quite a bit saved up by then. Thanks
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Old 01-29-2012, 11:14 AM   #3
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We`ve used drier lint for years.
We fill discarded TP tubes & stuff them with the lint.
Seems to burn longer & hotter.
This past year we also started using those compressed sawdust logs.
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Old 02-06-2012, 08:30 PM   #4
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try rubbing Vasoline on the lint. When ready for a fire, fluff out the lint and it burns like a candle.
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Old 07-24-2012, 09:08 PM   #5
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I use a cardboard egg carton. Fill each 'egg hole' with dryer lint and then pour melted wax over the lint. Let cool and then break off one or two 'eggs' and use to start your fire. I know some substitute sawdust for the dryer lint but I don't have a good source for sawdust and I have a LOT of dryer lint.
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Old 07-24-2012, 09:20 PM   #6
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I do the dryer lint, egg carton, and wax thing.
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Old 07-24-2012, 09:22 PM   #7
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We used sawdust and old candles...... you can get candles CHEAP at thrift stores and some smell nice too!
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Old 07-24-2012, 09:25 PM   #8
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We do the dryer lint and TP or paper towel rolls cut in half. Everybody thought we were crazy when we would start our fire. Now they are doing it. Best of all no starter fluid taste or smell. Haven't used starter fluid in years!!
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Old 07-24-2012, 09:26 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kris10May View Post
I use a cardboard egg carton. Fill each 'egg hole' with dryer lint and then pour melted wax over the lint. Let cool and then break off one or two 'eggs' and use to start your fire. I know some substitute sawdust for the dryer lint but I don't have a good source for sawdust and I have a LOT of dryer lint.
Shame you weren't close to Concord, NC last Tues, I dumped the box under my table saw and had over 30 gal of sawdust when it was uncompressed from being in the box. Don't know how it gets compressed that much, but it sure expands when you dig it out.
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Old 07-24-2012, 10:41 PM   #10
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We still use the technique we learned from our grandparents in England. We take newspapers (double-page full-size, not tabloids) and roll them up diagonally. Then we tie them in a loose knot.

Two of those and some kindling will light a coal fire, so dry logs are no problem. With all the grief about transporting logs, we're seriously thinking about hauling a 50-pound bag of coal instead. Coal fires will run for about 5 hours without having to add more fuel. The intial smoke at start-up can be obnoxious for maybe 10 minutes, compared to wood smoke, but once it's up and running, it's almost odor-free. Of course, the "nostalgic aroma" of a log fire is absent.

In our earlier S&B, we had a fireplace that could actually burn things (not like our present place which has a gas "log" fire with a through the wall flue rather than a real chimney).

With our fairly frequent power outages in that area of Washington, we kept a store of coal on hand. We didn't use it that often, but coal takes a lot less maintenance of the fire than logs, once it's lit.
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