Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-29-2016, 08:15 PM   #41
Senior Member
 
The_Rhino's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 625
Quote:
In a nutshell, yes, you are protected unless you have a bad connection on either end that is overheating
Since my portable Progressive Industries PT30C is at the pedestal, the 50A adapter/receptacle would have to fail which would only damage the plugs/receptacle & trip the breaker prior to the PT30C. Everything after the PT30C should, in theory, be protected. That said, if lightning hits the cord going into my TT, or someone drives a shovel or stake through my 30A cord all bets are off...

EDIT - & yes I saw your thread on how you did the mod, so thanks Turbs! And, I also got my awning poles from you, which look/work great.
__________________

__________________
2011 RAM 2500 ST Crew Cab 5.7 Hemi ($14K in '13)
2011 Primetime 3150BHD Touring Edition ($20K in '14)
Days camped in 2017-31
2016-36; 2015-37; 2014-31

The_Rhino is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2016, 10:01 PM   #42
Phat Phrog Stunt Team
 
TURBS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Iowa
Posts: 34,337
Yes I remember your poles!
Didn't know if you saw my thread on the a/c.
I'm glad your happy with the poles.


2015 Columbus 320RS
2008 2500HD Duramax
2015 nights camped "34"
__________________

__________________
TURBS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2016, 10:08 PM   #43
CDR USN Ret
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Full-Time
Posts: 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brewhedd View Post
IMO a 30 amp receptacle is better. A 50 amp service provides about 25 amps on each leg. So if you are trying to use one leg of a 50 amp circuit you are not going to be able to run close to 30 amps. When I tried running with one leg of the 220 receptacle on my generator it kept kicking the breaker. When I ran off the 30 amp 110 receptacle there was no problem.
A 50 Amp service provides 50 amps on EACH leg. You get two separate 50 amp, 120V circuits. 50 amps x 120 volts = 6000 watts available on each leg. A 30 amp 120 volt circuit provides 3600 watts (power)
If your cord is a 30 amp rated cord, and you plug it into a 50 amp circuit breaker-protected receptacle, you are now in violation of the National Electrical Code - NEC requires conductors be protected at their rated capacity and at the source where they receive their power supply (the campground pedestal). The 30 amp breaker in your RV distribution panel is not protecting your power cord.
__________________
2015 XLR415AMP
2011 3500HD Duramax/Allison/90 Gal Aux
2015 HD Limited Low
DSQR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2016, 11:14 PM   #44
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Orlando
Posts: 426
Quote:
Originally Posted by DSQR View Post
A 50 Amp service provides 50 amps on EACH leg. You get two separate 50 amp, 120V circuits. 50 amps x 120 volts = 6000 watts available on each leg. A 30 amp 120 volt circuit provides 3600 watts (power)
If your cord is a 30 amp rated cord, and you plug it into a 50 amp circuit breaker-protected receptacle, you are now in violation of the National Electrical Code - NEC requires conductors be protected at their rated capacity and at the source where they receive their power supply (the campground pedestal). The 30 amp breaker in your RV distribution panel is not protecting your power cord.
I may be wrong but I don't think a 50 amp breaker will allow 50 amps through each leg, maybe a very brief surge current. For one thing the wire size of each leg will not support 50 amps each. A 50 amp breaker trips when 50 amps is exceeded, unless I am totally confused.
__________________
Brewhedd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2016, 11:58 PM   #45
Senior Member
 
caper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 1,973
Quote:
I may be wrong but I don't think a 50 amp breaker will allow 50 amps through each leg, maybe a very brief surge current. For one thing the wire size of each leg will not support 50 amps each. A 50 amp breaker trips when 50 amps is exceeded, unless I am totally confused.
On a 50 amp service each leg is 50 amps for a total of 100 amps. If you are using a 30 amp cord on a 50 amp service and something did happen and your 30 amp breaker in your unit did not trip you could draw over the 30 amp limit that your cord is rated to carry. The 50 amp breaker is built to trip at 50 amps.
__________________
Terry and Janet
2008 3001W Windjammer
2007 Ford F150
caper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2016, 12:00 AM   #46
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 146
we found that plugging in to the 50a box then using the 30a adapter, it we inadvertently used too much pwr causing breaker to pop, the main switch in our tt would go vice using a 30a box which then, we would have to go outside to main box and reset it. just saved us from going outside to reset switch vice staying inside tt to reset switch.
__________________
stormy2000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2016, 12:47 AM   #47
CDR USN Ret
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Full-Time
Posts: 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brewhedd View Post
I may be wrong but I don't think a 50 amp breaker will allow 50 amps through each leg, maybe a very brief surge current. For one thing the wire size of each leg will not support 50 amps each. A 50 amp breaker trips when 50 amps is exceeded, unless I am totally confused.
You're confusing a single 240V 50A circuit (as used in your sticks and bricks house) with two separate 120V 50A circuits (as used in a 50A RV). Both use a 50A two-pole circuit breaker. This is made by connecting two single pole 50A circuit breakers side-by-side, and tying the two single pole breaker handles together with a handle tie.

When used in the 120V 50A RV application, each single pole component sees different currents. The poles are in parallel and each is protecting a different circuit. (the neutral wire is used as a common for each of the 120V circuits. In this application, one side(pole) of the circuit breaker may be seeing 50A while the other side (pole) is seeing only 10A. But if either of the two sides sees greater than 50A, it trips. Because the sides are tied together by the handle tie, both 120V circuits are interrupted. (Two circuits)

In the 240V application, both poles see the same amperage because it's the same current flowing from the source to the load on one side that is now returning from the same load back to the current source through the other side of the breaker. (One circuit)
__________________
2015 XLR415AMP
2011 3500HD Duramax/Allison/90 Gal Aux
2015 HD Limited Low
DSQR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2016, 02:25 AM   #48
Senior Member
 
caper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 1,973
Quote:
we found that plugging in to the 50a box then using the 30a adapter, it we inadvertently used too much pwr causing breaker to pop, the main switch in our tt would go vice using a 30a box which then, we would have to go outside to main box and reset it. just saved us from going outside to reset switch vice staying inside tt to reset switch.
This is a great reason why you should not be using the 50 amp. If your 30 amp did not trip for some reason you would be overloading the electrical panel in your trailer. If the breaker did not trip you could have a fire in your trailer because the wire overheated.
__________________
Terry and Janet
2008 3001W Windjammer
2007 Ford F150
caper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2016, 07:46 AM   #49
Senior Member
 
The_Rhino's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 625
Quote:
If your 30 amp did not trip for some reason you would be overloading the electrical panel in your trailer... [and] you could have a fire in your trailer because the wire overheated.
IMO it is more dangerous having a bad / worn 30A connection & breaker at the pedestal... We only camped a few times before getting a 50/30 adapter combined with the Progressive Industries PT30C surge protector because the worn 30A pedestal connections continued to overheat & melt my 30A plug. I had to clean my plug each time & eventually replaced it with a Camco plug.

IMO a hot 30A wire on the edge of catching on fire will trip the 50A breaker... We trust the main breakers in our homes & even a 200A breaker will trip when it experiences a short...
__________________
2011 RAM 2500 ST Crew Cab 5.7 Hemi ($14K in '13)
2011 Primetime 3150BHD Touring Edition ($20K in '14)
Days camped in 2017-31
2016-36; 2015-37; 2014-31

The_Rhino is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2016, 08:24 AM   #50
jkoenig24
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Box Elder, SD (formerly NY)
Posts: 378
You're mistaken Brewhedd. A properly wired "50A" service actually provides a total of 100A. Each hot leg is a separate 50A. 50A + 50A = 100A. A 50A ~ 30A adapter simply uses just one of the two 50A legs. The 30A circuit breaker will (should) trip, if the user tries to exceed 30A (use microwave + hair dryer + A/C simultaneously).
__________________

__________________
jkoenig24 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
50 amp, power

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:16 AM.