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Old 02-19-2016, 11:22 PM   #1
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Question Motorhomes inside rear wheels

There are generally no spare tire on a Class A motorhome. Roadmaster now has a spare tire carrier for class A. What wheels should the spare tire be mounted on? Obvious choice would be front wheel type. Any one knows if the interior rear wheel is the same as the front wheel? Hope I make sense.
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Old 02-20-2016, 11:32 PM   #2
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My inside rear tires are the same size as the outside.
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Old 02-21-2016, 12:09 AM   #3
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Thanks. I meant the wheel itself. I found the answer this afternoon. All wheels are the same simply mounted differently. This makes sense as you do not have to worry about having different wheels (front, rear outside and rear inside). This is what I thought, but since I could not see how the wheels were made I could not be sure. Appreciate your input.
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Old 02-21-2016, 01:14 PM   #4
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If using a motorhome spare what you can do depends on the size of the wheel and your physical condition. We had pickup campers where the trucks had 16" and 19.5" wheels so I carried a spare and all the tools. I practiced changing them in the driveway so I knew I had the ability to break loose the stud nuts as well as lift the tire and wheel into place.
When we got a motorhome with 22.5" wheels I did not carry a mounted spare but only the tire. The tire weighed 95 lbs so there was no way I could handle a wheel and tire combo. I could not even break loose the nuts. I had to use the spare tire two times to get us home from western U.S. In both cases we were able to have the change made at a tire store but mobile tire services are available all over and they are fast. We have several friends who have used mobile services and they had good experiences.
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Old 02-21-2016, 03:33 PM   #5
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Thanks for the info and your experience. I could not find a space in my motorhome where I could store a spare tire. Only when I saw the Roadmaster spare tire gear could I imagine carrying a spare with me - but you need to have it mounted. I am fine with it. I expected to have to use a mobile service anyway. Not an issue with me. It was more a question of having what I need and have them do the install. Now if it happens I should be able to be quickly back on the road.
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Old 02-22-2016, 01:09 PM   #6
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On our Bluebird, we stored the spare on the roof,,,,,, steel body, I know,,,, 12R22.5 tires are heavy. There was a removable davit and winch assembly that attached to the roof rack. We could lower and raise the spare when we needed to with little effort. We used a planetary gear wrench to loosen and tighten the lug nuts, it took only 23 ft lbs to tighten them to spec. Here's an example of one of many out there: Torque Multiplier Wrench | eBay
And yes, I did change a tire by myself on the road,,,,, US1 coming out of the Keys. I'm glad we had the means to do it!
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Old 02-22-2016, 06:56 PM   #7
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Thanks for the info. I did not know a torque multiplier even existed. Looks like an excellent piece of gear.
What did you use to raise the wheel off the ground? We are not supposed to raise the wheels off the ground when we level the coach, but the automatic self-levelling has done it on occasion, so theoretically I could do it that way!
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Old 02-22-2016, 07:40 PM   #8
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Maybe I'm overly cautious, but I highly recommend NOT changing your own tires on the road. The weight on one wheel alone can equal an entire automobile. Normal jacks aren't strong enough and having a solid surface under the jack is an absolute must. Also, the reason Ford recommends not raising the rear wheels off the ground with the stabilizers (they're not jacks) is due to weight of the rear of the coach sitting on them (60-70% of the total RV weight) and the lateral force it applies to the front jacks. Be safe...we'd like to keep you around!
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Old 02-22-2016, 10:49 PM   #9
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I agree with your comments. I could contemplate doing it on the front wheels, but not the back wheels. Anyhow I have the service provides by my insurance to get me out of these situations. If push comes to shove I know I could get moving again, but I will not tempt faith more than needed.
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Old 02-23-2016, 07:49 AM   #10
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Thanks for the info. I did not know a torque multiplier even existed. Looks like an excellent piece of gear.
What did you use to raise the wheel off the ground? We are not supposed to raise the wheels off the ground when we level the coach, but the automatic self-levelling has done it on occasion, so theoretically I could do it that way!
On the Bird, I used the leveling jacks to stabilize and raise it most of the way. Then I used a bottle jack under the axle to pick the tire up the rest of the way. This coach was fitted with oversize jacks from HWH (great people by the way) so we could easily lift it entirely off the ground on them if we wanted to. Other coaches I serviced when I had my shop, we would simply use the bottle jack by itself.
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Old 02-23-2016, 09:34 AM   #11
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Maybe I'm overly cautious, but I highly recommend NOT changing your own tires on the road. The weight on one wheel alone can equal an entire automobile. Normal jacks aren't strong enough and having a solid surface under the jack is an absolute must. Also, the reason Ford recommends not raising the rear wheels off the ground with the stabilizers (they're not jacks) is due to weight of the rear of the coach sitting on them (60-70% of the total RV weight) and the lateral force it applies to the front jacks. Be safe...we'd like to keep you around!
First off they are jacks (levelers) not stabilizers. If the system is the LCI (Lippert) hydraulic system they raise (jack) in tandem (2 front, 2 rear, 2 left, 2 right) in manual mode and this is the mode that would be used for changing a tire. Each jack rated at 12000 pounds (could be wrong). The only warning I have seen is to not raise all wheels off the ground. It is recommended not to use the levelers to change a tire but this is the way the garage does it for my tire changes. With that said, those tires are heavy and a real pain in the a** to maneuver so I leave it to the roadside assistance professionals. Just another input.
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Old 02-24-2016, 07:58 AM   #12
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IMO it is a good idea to carry a spare tire. Use a mobile service or limp to a shop if the flat is on the rear. But having your own spare tire insures that you are not stuck on the road waiting for a tire.
A friend had to wait several days at a shop in VA and another had to drive 250 miles each direction in Texas to get his own tire while his coach sat in an I-10 rest area (but with another coach they were traveling with.) We were lucky that the shop where we stopped in S. Dakota had a proper size tire from China. Don't laugh!! We drove on that tire home to Fla. from S. Dakota and again a couple of years later from Utah.
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Old 02-24-2016, 08:42 AM   #13
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X2 to the other comments. I am not sure I would ever want to change my own tire. and carry a spare? What would the weight of a tire and rim be?


Worse case, call road side service and have a beverage at the table inside while you wait.


Best Case: Have one of these in your toolbox: http://www.amazon.com/Victor-22-5-00.../dp/B000AMOEGY
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Old 02-24-2016, 09:37 AM   #14
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X2 to the other comments. I am not sure I would ever want to change my own tire. and carry a spare? What would the weight of a tire and rim be?


Worse case, call road side service and have a beverage at the table inside while you wait.


Best Case: Have one of these in your toolbox: http://www.amazon.com/Victor-22-5-00.../dp/B000AMOEGY
I seriously doubt you'd ever get one of those through a G rated moho tire. But I do carry one with me for my small work trailer. Even those D rated tires a muther to get a plug into.
As a side note, most, if not all tire manufacturers will not honor a warranty on their tires for separation if an 'outside in' tire repair is done, without dismounting the tire and applying patch to the inside of the injury.
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