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Old 09-05-2018, 08:33 AM   #1
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Tire care during extended storage.

I am curious to know if others raise tires off the ground while storing their campers for the winter. In the midwest we have 5 or 6 months where we can't use our campers. Is it worth while to get tires off the ground? We store indoors on a concrete floor. Is it acceptable to use the 6 point leveling system to support the camper or should it be set on blocks or stands?
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Old 09-05-2018, 09:02 AM   #2
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In Colorado, our trailer normally sits from October until April or even May. I always cover the wheels to protect from the UV rays and, now, I do put down the stabilizers/levelers because one year I didn't and we had high winds and it pushed the front of the trailer a couple feet to the side. I chalk wheels on both sides and I also cover the A/C on the roof and will visit her at least monthly to ensure the covers are still there, no critters are inside, and that the tires are still full. (I keep a portable 12-volt air compressor in the truck.)
Concerning the wheel covers, I wrap them with straps because our high winds take them off pretty easily. (Our lot has gravel, not sure if folks on concrete need to do anything else.)
I have a TPMS system so I take those off the tires (I mark where they go so I don't have to re-program the receiver in the Spring) and I'll replace all the little batteries during the winter. (Having them off in the winter also makes it a lot easier to top off the tires...I won't let them get below 45, they are supposed to be at 50.)
Every drop of water gets drained from the camper and the pink winterizer solution is pumped through the lines and some goes in every p-trap and we also put a few inches in the toilet to prevent any bad odors from coming up. During our monthly visits we'll open a few windows and vents to get fresh air in there and if we have a warm winter day we'll dust and vacuum. (It's funny how many dead flies you find in a parked camper.)
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Old 09-05-2018, 09:17 AM   #3
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ColoradoRick provided some great advise. To answer your question, yes, raise your tires off the ground. Some use wood, some plastic levelers, but either way, get 'em off the ground.

Safe and happy travels.
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Old 09-05-2018, 09:24 AM   #4
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I have used wood to get the rubber off the ground in the past. I was thinking more about getting all the weight of the trailer off the tires by either using the leveling system or blocks of some sort.
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Old 09-05-2018, 12:45 PM   #5
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Use "303 protectorate " and cover with white covers
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Old 09-05-2018, 12:53 PM   #6
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Hey Rickey:

Good advice given before my reply.

For sure wheels at least on wood
The ground has a great way of weather checking tires even with the covers on.

One other thing you can do which I think has helped mine is to spray silicone on the sidewalls as this prevents condensation on the rubber and looks nice too.

Tires don't like setting in one position for a long time so off the ground is always the best but sometimes not possible.

Hope this helps,Teamgreen
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Old 09-05-2018, 02:05 PM   #7
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Just out of curiosity, what happens to the tire rubber when in contact with the ground for several cold months? I know when tires were bias ply they would get a flat spot from sitting for long periods.
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Old 09-05-2018, 02:14 PM   #8
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Only the ones with nylon cords...

Quote:
Originally Posted by PSU Turf View Post
Just out of curiosity, what happens to the tire rubber when in contact with the ground for several cold months? I know when tires were bias ply they would get a flat spot from sitting for long periods.
Only the tires with Nylon cords flat-spotted. It would occur overnight. After 2-3 miles the problem was gone. When they switched to Dacron (early 1960s IIRC), the problem went away. I've never heard of flat-spot occurring with steel-belted tires.

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Old 09-05-2018, 02:19 PM   #9
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Add to all above...take battery out and place on trickle charge or charge maintainer, preferably is a garage or basement
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Old 09-05-2018, 02:24 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PSU Turf View Post
Just out of curiosity, what happens to the tire rubber when in contact with the ground for several cold months? I know when tires were bias ply they would get a flat spot from sitting for long periods.
Nothing that I can tell. We have many farm trailers and other equipment that are only used about three months out of the year. The rest of the time the tires just sit in either dirt, concrete, or crusher fines. Some even get irrigated regularly.

We replace these tires even less often than our RV tires. And yes, the farm trailer tires, when used, are at highway speeds.

I also have '79 half ton that get used infrequently. It has 15 year old Big O AT tires on it. Sits in the sun, on concrete, all day. I even use dreaded tire dressing on the tires. No checking and the white letters still look good

I do cover my RV tires when at home, (because my wife bought them) parked on crusher fines.
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