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Old 02-25-2016, 06:58 PM   #21
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Lots of good suggestions here including fluid film. I would not use transmission fluid for a number of reasons.
It has a lower flashpoint than most oils. Truck manufacturers have had recalls because trannys would burb up or leak and spill fluid over a hot exhaust and start a fire. It may also like most thin oils and solvents be hard on rubber components of your body and suspension and fuel and brake lines. Not a big deal but it smells bad where something like fluid film ha a more pleasant smell.

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Old 02-25-2016, 07:14 PM   #22
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Just remember...if it needs any welding done if future, that's got to be cleaned off....

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Old 02-26-2016, 05:31 PM   #23
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Well in have found this discussion very interesting to say the least, BUT lets get down to the down and dirty of this discussion;
1) The question was what about using transmission oil to save a frame? well here are the top reasons i can think as to why you do NOT what to do this;
1) it is not going to help your situation, transmission oil is to thin and will run off and evaporate to fast
2) The run off of the oil also is another big issue that all seem to miss, but all road and government laws you can not have oil dripping off the frame of a vehicle on the roads today that has been applied by the owner.
3) it will cause issues with electrical wiring, the oil if in contact with the 12 volt or 120 volt wiring may break down the insulation and cause a short or a fire from the short
So these are the most important things that come to mind with your question, and with all the great products on the market today to help this condition (rust) that someone would ask to spray a oil all over a frame just baffles me?
Also one of the products i did not see mentioned was the bed liner products, you are able to purchase them almost everywhere, you are able to purchase both brush and spray types, so if you are looking for a LONG term solution this might be your best.
Since you did not mention what year or type of coach your own, as that matters also, so what do i mean is; if it is a small light weight coach it will not take much of any product to cover the frame, but if it is a heavy weight lets say 5th wheel with a 12 in frame well that a story all together. So you know what you own, how long you tend to keep it, weather this is a keep it shinny thing or make it last for ever thing. So all these points all make a big difference on your choices, so i hope some of this will help you out with your decisions, and in the end it is just Happy Camping
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Old 02-27-2016, 07:35 AM   #24
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I did mention the bed liner coating as I used it on our 27' Class C 2500TS. I used a combination of Rustoleum rubberized undercoating and Rustoleum spray-on bed liner. Both come in handy large spray cans and flow on very well. Shake them well and the cans run our of product before the run out of propellant. It has a pretty strong spray to get to the hard to reach places. The cost was under a hundred dollars and the cheapest was Walmart. I used an old bed sheet to cover parts I didn't want sprayed, a cheap plastic tarp to catch drips on the driveway, eye protection, a breathing mask, old clothes, and minereal spirits for clean up. The advantage I had was that it was one of the first things I did when we brought the coach home.

The biggest problem I had doing this was waiting for Walmart to restock as the stores only display a few cans and no reserve. As I recall, I used around 9-10 cans of undercoating and 5 cans of bed liner spray-on. There were other more expensive brands of these products at other stores, but Rustoleum products have always treated me well. Spray is definitely the way to go. A can and paint brush can't reach and would be time consuming, more wasteful and much more messy.
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Old 05-11-2016, 06:52 PM   #25
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When I worked in the service station in the late 50s that rubber lube was silicon spray. I think it was more of a lubercant for the springs than a rust protector. Just saying
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Old 05-12-2016, 10:40 PM   #26
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I spray my frame components with Rustoleum Rusty metal flat black primer. It works great and if there is surface rust, I'm not all concerned.

Tranny fluid is too thin and stinky to use to coat metal parts. Either paint or bedliner spray would be a good choice.
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Old 05-13-2016, 08:34 AM   #27
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[QUOTE=TonyD;1193394]I spray my frame components with Rustoleum Rusty metal flat black primer. It works great and if there is surface rust, I'm not all concerned.

When we got our 2500TS home, I crawled under and notice a lot of bare metal. I used a combination of Rustoleum Bed Liner spray and Rustoleum Rubberized Undercoat to coat exposed metal including cab floor pan, front wheel wells, inside the front bumper. Bought spray cans in the Walmart automotive departments. It took about 12 cans, but a very good investment. Better to do it when new, but then it's never too late.
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Old 05-13-2016, 10:02 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by tom3205 View Post
Years ago, service stations would spray leaf spring s and steering, suspension, with something called "Rubber Lube". Don't know what that was made of. Would that work..
I remember doing that working in service stations way back when, it was CRC 5.56 which is your basic WD40. Used to spray it on suspension bushings and just about any thing rubber under the car to prevent squeaks. Now that I know better, I wouldn't go there no way.

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