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Old 09-20-2009, 03:12 PM   #51
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There is a lot of room to access the necessary switches and flame ignition. Should be no problem for routine maintenance later.





Next on the agenda was to focus on the upper vent.



I insulated on both sides of the fridge with standard fiberglass batten, and then added a layer of reflectix on the top and taped the joints.

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Old 09-20-2009, 03:13 PM   #52
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Old 09-20-2009, 03:14 PM   #53
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I used reflectix on the sides in this upper vent area as well.







With the exception of a 12V supply line, the fridge install is done. Its running on propane now, and cooled to 46F now after a couple of hours.

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Old 09-20-2009, 03:14 PM   #54
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I'm really happy with how it looks, and works.

Luckily, I was able to remove that little drain screw without any problem. Cleaned out the drain accordingly, and re-assembled.

I attached the city water to the center connection, and the potable water for hand pump to the open connection. I left the plugged connection as-is. Had to buy a new drain line, which sounds simple but is not easy to find. I tried the hardware store black rubber version but it kinked too easily and proved useless. I ended up buying a ribbed drain line from the RV dealer. Not cheap, but works great.

I haven't hooked up a 12V water pump yet, but might next year. I'd probably go with a different faucet if I installed a pump. If I had city water pressure or pump pressure, I'd prefer a tradition faucet handle without a hand pump where you just open it to turn the water on.

When I flip my sink over for travel, it drools out the faucet spigot. Is it normal to have a water shut-off at the sink to prevent it from siphoning out the potable water storage tank? The water level in the full tank may be above the faucet spigot if it was full. Either way, mine runs out to the floor.

I have an extra water shutoff valve for the 3/8 tubing. Wasn't sure where it belonged. Now I think I know where it went...lol

Good news...the fridge running for 12 hours on propane (overnight) is down to 24F ! It appears the air flow circuit helps.
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Old 09-20-2009, 03:15 PM   #55
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just did what seemed to be the correct way to install it. That fridge gets really hot in the back, and I didn't want the excess heat to seep into the camper through crevices. This time of year it might be nice to have extra heat, but in the summer months (camping season) I suffer in the humidity as it is. Added bonus it that any CO2 or propane issues should vent out to atmosphere well. I suppose a LPG and/or CO2 detector would be a wise investment.

The upper vent (running on propane anyways) gets noticeably hotter than the lower intake vent. That a good sign there must be air circulation. I'll probably toss that thermometer in the upper vent area next year just for curiosity. I need to install screens behind the vents in the spring.

May or may not get camping again this season. Busy, busy, busy at work with lots of travel. Most campgrounds around here have closed, or will be closing shortly for the season.

Added a pic of the venting just for clarity. Center baffle extends 8" inward from outer skin, and is 6 inches high. Upper baffle is only slight tilted upwards as the fridge height is almost as high as the pup. Only had enough room for one small layer of reflectix between the top of the fridge and the counter-top. Even then, it was compressed.

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Old 09-20-2009, 03:55 PM   #56
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WOW !!!

That's one heck of a project. You did a great job.

To answer your first question, this is in the first paragraph, on the home page.

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Have fun with your refurbished camper.
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Old 09-29-2009, 01:18 AM   #57
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Thanks for the clarification and kind words milzat.
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Old 09-29-2009, 01:36 PM   #58
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I restore cars as a hobby, and I have to say you did a FANTASTIC job on that Flagstaff pop up!! I too love modifying things to make them better than when new. Outstanding work, and you have found a great website! Randy
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Old 09-29-2009, 05:28 PM   #59
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Thanks Randy. Appreciate the kudos.

I actually enjoy working on old things to resurrect them for further use. My other hobby is repairing older outboard motors, and tinkering with anything mechanical. Simple things like spending time making a large old rusty automotive battery charger look like new again, rather than replacing it with a new one. $1 spent at a garage sale instead of spending hard earned cash on a new one. My Coleman stove is another example... some time cleaning it up and repainting it will extend its useful life, I hope. Some may see it as a waste of time, but I enjoy it and figure its time well spent. My newest project acquired this weekend in trade, is an old two wheeler..



Sadly, I think my camper may be tucked away in the garage for the season. Between traveling with work, other commitments, and declining weather trends... I'm not sure I can squeeze it in. We'll see.
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Old 10-11-2009, 11:19 PM   #60
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I was lucky today and found a local ad listing 4 BAL stabilizers with the leveler pads. This trailer only has two factory stabilizers in the rear, and relies on the tongue jack to support the front. We had issues with our frame flexing and allowing the locked door to swing open when we are in bed for the night.

I was able to get a set of (4) 17" stabilizers for only $25. He also included the 14" crank handle.



These are dusty, but not rusty. They are not that old, and were removed from a late 90's era Rockwood pup in favor of scissor jacks.

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