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Old 08-20-2015, 08:31 PM   #11
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Should be able to measure the thickness of the floor at the entrance way, using an inexpensive large C-clamp. Just mark the location on the clamp threads when tightened, then measure opening after removal. Won't be to the MM like it would be with a large micrometer, but that is not a usual tool to have around the house.
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Old 08-20-2015, 09:54 PM   #12
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The floor is part of the wall to wall structure of the camper so it's hard to take out much and replace it, it need to connect to the boards adjoining. One thought is once you have the leaks under control is to pull up the vinyl and lay down luan over the entire floor (mastic to the sub floor). The put vinyl over the top. Watch the height for cabinets and your slideout.

My floor repair on my last camper:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/cdrdwd...57627084950665

Good luck.
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Old 08-21-2015, 07:33 AM   #13
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It appears that you also had a foam floor. What is the thickness? It looked like you had a 1/2 of white and then 1 1/2" of pink foam! That is 2" thick + luan. Are the foam floors that thick? wow.

Hopefully the OP has an OSB floor. The foam floors are a bit more involved to repair as you found out.

Great idea on the C-clamp F5.

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Old 08-21-2015, 08:01 AM   #14
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Vin,

My old floor was 1/4" luan 1.5" foam (white original, pink replace) and 1/4" laun.
I added an additional 1/4 laun on top, this made the floor better than new.

(apparently form my last post, I can't spell, can't type and don't proof read)
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Old 08-21-2015, 08:54 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danrlewis73 View Post
Thanks for the replies. The bottom does seem to have the black membrane underneath. But there is definitely OSB on the top under the vinyl flooring. Any idea how thick the OSB is? I'd like to cut the particle board out without damaging the underlayment. I don't have a problem with replacing the vinyl. And I'm almost positive that FR would never cover this. It's a 2006. And I'm the third owner (at least). Any idea what a shop might charge to repair something like this?
danrlewis,,, are you saying the OSB floor is exposed under the trailer ???
We had a StarCraft popup years ago,,, bottom was covered with Stainless Steel,,, one of the reasons we bought A StarCraft !!!
The floor should not be visible from underneath ???
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Old 08-21-2015, 09:01 AM   #16
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This is probably not possible,,, but as an old floorcovering installer,,, I have to wonder if you could subfloor over existing floor,,,, and install new vinyl ???
I think no matter what you do,,, the existing floor must be covered underneath !!!
I Think ???
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Old 08-21-2015, 09:29 AM   #17
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Apparently the reason the underneath is exposed is to allow it to breath. One must understand that the inside is covered with non-breathable vinyl flooring. If the bottom was sealed to the elements also, then any moisture that got into the wood would be unable to escape and potentially lead to mold then rot.

Not quite sure how factual the above is but that has been the conventional wisdom. Many old time pop up owners will mention the floor on their units were exposed underneath and lasted for decades.

I too think it is counter intuitive to have the bottom exposed to the elements, especially road spray, but it does seem to be ok.

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Old 08-21-2015, 10:15 AM   #18
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I have never seen a TT or a Manufactured Home where the floor was exposed,,,
They have a name for that Black Plastic they use,,, just can't remember what they call it ??? They also make a special tape to repair it with !!! Maybe Dan should check with FR and find out if there is something missing under his Pop-Up ???
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Old 08-21-2015, 01:11 PM   #19
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Many PUPs (Coleman, Fleetwood, many Rockwood/Flagstaff) and A-frames have OSB (not particle board) floors and end bunks. Oriented Strand Board (especially the brand names used by the PUP manufacturers) has reasonable water resistance(better than most plywood) if allowed to dry after being wetted. Immersion will eventually cause problems. The recommendation for the OSB floors is to leave them uncoated on the bottom so that road splash can dry easily. As has been said, many OSB floors on PUPs last for years under these conditions.

What causes problems is where mud/dirt/frame traps the water against the OSB (on the bottom) or it gets under the vinyl flooring and trapped against the OSB on top. In either case, the OSB never dries properly and the exposed wood strands may start to soften.

In the more expensive and lighter RVs, foam core is used to save weight compared to OSB - OSB is a little heavier than plywood of the same thickness.

Repairing OSB itself is easy - simply cut out and replace the softened area with high quality plywood or OSB. Redoing the vinyl covering is more problemmatic - the vinyl is laid down as a single sheet before the cabinetry is installed during assembly of a PUP and A-frame. So either you piece mis-matching vinyl or take the time to remove all the furniture/cabinetry. The latter will be a better rebuild, especially if you refasten the cabinetry when you put it back, but is much more time-consuming.

just my experiences
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Old 08-21-2015, 02:16 PM   #20
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My 2015 HW296 has exposed OSB that has been painted black on the bottom face.
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