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Old 05-17-2013, 01:38 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Jeep4Two View Post

I think this is going to be a regular safety check for me and want to do it right. I have a meter and am reading your articles but am VERY respectful of electricity and would rather use a plug and play type device as the little yellow outlet tester.
I've looked at the Prime Tester before, but have never played with one to know for sure. But I'm thinking that one of them along with a 30-amp to 15 amp dog-bone adapter (as mentioned earlier) plus a NCVT such as the Klein NCVT-1 would be about as foolproof as you can get, be super-easy to use, and should be able to find 99% of all RV outlet mis-wired situations. I'm only giving this a 99% rating because it doesn't put a load on the wires to check for corroded connections.

You could also get a 50-amp/240-volt fan-out adapter to use the same tester setup on 50 amp RV outlets. That's a bit more complicated since you should always check for bootleg 240-volts (one hot leg wired to both sides) which can cause your neutral wire to burn up with 100 amps instead of 50 amps current. I have pictures and measurements to prove it.

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Old 05-17-2013, 10:38 PM   #22
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This is why I never hook up without my Progressive Industries EMS-PT50C. Yep, a few bucks, but a lot of peace of mind.
I agree that spending a few hundred bucks to protect an investment of many thousands of dollars (and often a lot more $$$) is money well spent. And consider that many (most?) RV insurance policies have a $500 deductible, so a single avoided meltdown will more than pay for a voltage/surge protector.

That's because while much of what I experiment and write about involves human (and pet) shock, many of these outlet failures can result in damages of many thousands of dollars to your RV's electrical system. RV electrical systems aren't cheap, and there's more computerized gadgets going into them every day as we surround ourselves with our favorite electronics. So protect your life and your property by testing BEFORE you plug into an unknown outlet, and consider installing a voltage/surge protector for extra peace of mind.

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Old 07-21-2013, 06:22 PM   #23
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Bringing back an old thread, but I think this is the proper one in which to do this.

I just got a new generator for my TT, and have a question. But first, some background.

I have the trailer plugged into the house (15 amp outlet) and my EMS-PT50C shows all is well.

Today, I started the generator and plugged in the EMS-PT50C. While the voltage looks fine, it shows an open ground condition.

I suspect that the neutral and ground wires in the generator are not connected. I'm in the aviation electronics business and am not afraid to do electrical work, but I'm NOT an licensed electrician. So I always ask when I'm in doubt on something.

My question is, should I connect Neutral and Ground within the generator panel, or not? It'll be easy to do, I just don't know if it's the proper thing to do or not.

Thanks in advance.
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Old 07-21-2013, 06:30 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by DKListul View Post
Bringing back an old thread, but I think this is the proper one in which to do this.

I just got a new generator for my TT, and have a question. But first, some background.

I have the trailer plugged into the house (15 amp outlet) and my EMS-PT50C shows all is well.

Today, I started the generator and plugged in the EMS-PT50C. While the voltage looks fine, it shows an open ground condition.

I suspect that the neutral and ground wires in the generator are not connected. I'm in the aviation electronics business and am not afraid to do electrical work, but I'm NOT an licensed electrician. So I always ask when I'm in doubt on something.

My question is, should I connect Neutral and Ground within the generator panel, or not? It'll be easy to do, I just don't know if it's the proper thing to do or not.

Thanks in advance.
Watching this closely myself. While all is good plugged into the house, the Franks unit also reports an open ground error when running the generator.
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Old 07-21-2013, 06:34 PM   #25
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Yes, the correct thing to do is bond the neutral to the ground at the generator. You can do this in the cable itself or via a simple G-N bonding plug as I describe in my NoShockZone article at Generator Ground-Neutral Bonding | No~Shock~Zone

Also, here's my latest article in Reverse Polarity Bootleg Grounds at EC&M Magazine, which goes out to 100,000 electricians, inspectors, and plant engineers across the countyr. Read the online version at Failures in Outlet Testing Exposed | Contractor content from Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine

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Old 07-21-2013, 06:41 PM   #26
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Thanks! I'll probably do it this evening.
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Old 07-21-2013, 06:51 PM   #27
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Thanks! I'll probably do it this evening.
Please keep us all posted as to how this works for you. The only crazy stuff I've seen is when you're using my G-N bonding plug on a double Honda generator set with an aftermarket combo cable. In that case, you can to double-check the polarity of the poorly marked wires that interconnect the generators themselves. But this should be a 100% solid fix on an single generator with a floated neutral. I want to make sure I haven't missed any irrational generator designs.

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Old 07-21-2013, 07:09 PM   #28
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Please keep us all posted as to how this works for you. The only crazy stuff I've seen is when you're using my G-N bonding plug on a double Honda generator set with an aftermarket combo cable. In that case, you can to double-check the polarity of the poorly marked wires that interconnect the generators themselves. But this should be a 100% solid fix on an single generator with a floated neutral. I want to make sure I haven't missed any irrational generator designs.

Mike Sokol
This is the solution for my Yamaha EF3000SiB.
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Old 07-21-2013, 07:19 PM   #29
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Done, and Done!


I removed the power panel on the generator (a cheap Chinese DuroMax XP4000S, got it for $329 including free 2nd day FedEx) and jumpered the N and G lines.

Works like a champ now! And my monitor shows good hookup and 123 V with the AC running.

Thanks for the tip. You guys are, as my daughter used to say, "THE BOMB!"" (I think it was meant as a compliment 15 years ago; regardless, that's how I meant it".)

We'll be heading to Front Sight Firearms Training Institute for 5 days in September and will need the AC.
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Old 07-21-2013, 07:31 PM   #30
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I think the reason for floating the neutral on generators under 5 KW is that it allows the manufacturer to eliminate the GFCI outlet that's required by code on generators with G-N bonding. However, your RV should have its own GFCI outlets as required by RVIA code, and be much safer.

The ultimate safety solution is to also also add a ground-rod to the generator, but that's generally too much trouble for an RVer. However, when I set up a large outdoor sound stage with a generator for musicians, I ALWAYS use a ground rod.

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