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Old 10-14-2014, 08:43 AM   #11
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That's our thinking. Fall camping in KS is phenomenal.
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Old 10-14-2014, 09:02 AM   #12
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You'll probably want to get a Progressive Dynamics. It seems to be the converter of choice. Don't be afraid to get get additional power while you upgrade.
The install is a piece of cake if you're even the slightest bit mechanically inclined.



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How do we determine how much extra 'oomph' would be appropriate in the new converter? We're certainly inclined to take advantage of the conversion and add capability!
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Old 10-14-2014, 02:36 PM   #13
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In answering you one question ... yes , plugging it into a 220 outlet would DEFINEATLY pop your convertor to the holy skies above with no chance of survival , but , its also possible to over power them ... meaning for example - say you had a 12 volt DC igloo cooler that utilizes a pelter to cool ... well pending on the rating of the peltier , you could draw as much as 20 amps ( or more ) and then say you hooked up a 12 volt DC little coffee warmer .. well ,chances are your converter was just pushed past its capacities and is NOW struggling like heck to maintain and getting hotter and hotter as the minutes go by and then WHAM-O .... and BEEP ... the IC ( integrated circuit ) chip inside just bit the big one and shorted out due to trying to do too much .

So , now , in answering your other question about HOW MUCH or HOW BIG of a convertor .... well , that all depends ... how much 12 volt DC power you thik you use ? Think of your cars fuse panel for example ... like your tail lights ( running lights ) just for the car would run around 15 to 20 amps ( based on you have filament lamps and not new style LED's ) and then go from there with how much power items you have in the PUP that uses 12 volt DC and check the amperage ratings for them ... ( to roughly convert DC watts to DC amps use this AMPS = WATTS/VOLTS )
So , lets say you total out to say 40 amps , then I would get something somewhere around 75 to 100 amps output . Also realize .. the more the amp output , the deeper pockets you will need to have .
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Old 10-14-2014, 04:32 PM   #14
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Hey everybody

According to the web, a Palomino Pony 280 is an 8ft box PUP - adorable and great for 2+2 (max) camping.

If you only have the normal single battery, getting a new converter that puts out more than 30 amps is a waste of money and space. Even with a dual size 24 battery installation (all there would be room for on the tongue), 30 amps is plenty.

Even in bulk mode, recharging an 80 amp-hour battery should only take 20 amps maximum. Dual batteries in bulk mode will get 15 amps of charge each, which is pretty close to the max charge rate.

Internal 12V loads consist of 2 lights (2 amps each until converted to LED) and heater fan (5 amps). Fridge runs on 120V or propane when camping.

Although Progressive are considered the gold standard for converters, the WFCO (common OEM converter for PUPs) tend to hold up pretty well in PUPs, as they are not heavily loaded. Of course, plugging into 220 instead of 120 can change that in a hurry.

just my experiences with PUPs and A-frames
Fred W
2014 Forest River A-122 (12ft box A-frame)
previously 2000 Coleman Westlake (12ft box PUP)
1986 Coachmen (10ft box PUP)
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Old 10-14-2014, 05:04 PM   #15
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Ok , but what your saying is more like the minimal .. not the max and thats what causes a converter to burn up ... not the minimals ... but the OVER doing . So , which ever route they choose is of course their option , but , IMO , there are TOO many variables involved and I don't think its worth ruining a camping trip due to an unrated converter . And like I said ... you add just a few items and thats all it takes . And 2 amps per light ? That all depends on the bulb ... and take a lookie loo at pictures like and this and try and guess WHY this happened ? Wanna bet it was electrical ?

Fire destroys camping trailer in Ridgefield | The Columbian
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Old 10-14-2014, 05:44 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by megsfinlay View Post
How do we determine how much extra 'oomph' would be appropriate in the new converter? We're certainly inclined to take advantage of the conversion and add capability!

I went from a 50 to a 60 amp. I only got a little extra juice. The more amps the bigger the converter. The 60 amp was only a little bit bigger than the original 50 amp so it fit nicely where the old one was.



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Old 10-14-2014, 07:00 PM   #17
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Having camped in smaller PUPs and A-frames for decades, I have found you will be hard put to run more than 10 amps of DC load under any reasonable conditions. And yes, the standard light bulb in the older PUP ceiling lights was a 2 amp bulb - and usually there is one at each end (may only be one in an 8ft box).

If you are camping without hookups where you are discharging your battery below 80% on a regular basis, then you will be into 12V load management, as that 80 amp-hour battery will only last 4 hours powering a 10 amp load. The first recommendation for PUP boondockers is to replace those 2 amp bulbs with 1/2 amp or less LED replacements. The second step is to add a second battery - which is where I'm at for 3 season no-hookup camping for 3-4 days with my A-frame. And my converter (30A WFCO) fan never even comes on because I'm not running enough load. (I turned on everything I could, including putting the fridge on DC and a well-discharged battery to establish the fan would come on if needed).

There is a reason why PUP owners do not experience near the number of converter failures that TT owners do - PUP 30A converters are not as heavily loaded as a typical TT.

If the OP wants to put in a bigger converter, more power to him. :-) I'm simply pointing out it's not necessary in the size camper he has.

Fred W
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Old 10-14-2014, 07:14 PM   #18
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Here's how things breakdown:

During a typical camping trip we have the following electrical items plugged in and running (this is a highest draw scenario -typically morning):

-1 coffee maker plugged into 120V receptacle
-1 19" flat screen TV plugged into 120V receptacle
-1 DVD player plugged into 120V receptacle
-2 12V (2 amp per) ceiling lights
-1 fridge running on 120V
-1 Space Heater fan running as needed to heat camper plugged into 120V receptacle

Someone smarter than us tell us if this will blow up a 30 amp converter? Frankly, now we're confused as all h3Il. And yes, we have a toddler and frankly going without the Curious George DVD for a weekend WILL end the world.
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Old 10-14-2014, 07:16 PM   #19
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We typically go to CG's with shore power, BTW. But, we enjoy a good rough camp from time to time.
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Old 10-14-2014, 08:03 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by megsfinlay View Post
Here's how things breakdown:

During a typical camping trip we have the following electrical items plugged in and running (this is a highest draw scenario -typically morning):

-1 coffee maker plugged into 120V receptacle
-1 19" flat screen TV plugged into 120V receptacle
-1 DVD player plugged into 120V receptacle
-2 12V (2 amp per) ceiling lights
-1 fridge running on 120V
-1 Space Heater fan running as needed to heat camper plugged into 120V receptacle

Someone smarter than us tell us if this will blow up a 30 amp converter? Frankly, now we're confused as all h3Il. And yes, we have a toddler and frankly going without the Curious George DVD for a weekend WILL end the world.
the converters job is to take the 120 shore power and convert it to 12V power to supply power to anything that would normally use the battery, the 3 way fridge when on 12V, the lights, the water pump, and will recharge the battery when needed. Things that can not run off the battery (Most of the other items on your list) have no impact on the converter as they are using the shore power directly. So what converter do you need? I would put in the same that came out. Mine has been working well for 5 seasons now and it is a wfco.
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