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Old 02-22-2016, 08:43 PM   #61
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Just read this thread and my only comment is horses get transported all over the country in trailers with no ill effects. So I don't see the problem of putting a dog in a cushy trailer with water.
ps I have hauled horses , mine and others so I know what I'm talking about.
That is a very valid thought process. I own horses and never considered that. The dogs have a double bed, or the floor to comfort themselves if it's bumpy. We train horses to haul quietly and they're much more prone is injury. Thanks for sharing your perspective.
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Old 02-22-2016, 09:23 PM   #62
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Just read this thread and my only comment is horses get transported all over the country in trailers with no ill effects. So I don't see the problem of putting a dog in a cushy trailer with water.
ps I have hauled horses , mine and others so I know what I'm talking about.
Wouldn't a horse trailer have a fair bit more ventilation than a TT? After all, they're designed to transport animals. TTs are not.
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Old 02-22-2016, 09:53 PM   #63
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Like a 5th wheel or travel trailer there are windows on the horse trailers. The point is they are exposed to CO gas also. In regards to the OP, I suspect that the heat and lack of ventilation might have caused a build up of CO (she said her CO detector went off). Heat build up is the main problem in trailering animals,that's why for the most part all windows are open. Not many people do that with their travel trailers for a variety of reasons.

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Old 02-22-2016, 11:45 PM   #64
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Originally Posted by LI Guy View Post
Just read this thread and my only comment is horses get transported all over the country in trailers with no ill effects. So I don't see the problem of putting a dog in a cushy trailer with water.
ps I have hauled horses , mine and others so I know what I'm talking about.
Ventilation in horse trailers may be more adequate, but it also may NOT be adequate, even with respect to CO2 from horses exhaling or ambient heat levels:

Ventilation in Horse Trailers | Equinews

http://pubag.nal.usda.gov/pubag/down...53&content=PDF

Horse Trailer World : Trailer Talk : TRailer Ventilation


Carbon monoxide deaths of horses in horse trailers have been repeatedly reported:

Horse Trailer World : Trailer Talk : Carbon Monoxide Deaths - Again.


Adequacy of ventilation (for multiple reasons) is discussed on many equine health and safety web sites, for example from the Horse Welfare Alliance of Canada:

"The environment within a trailer includes temperature, air quality and humidity levels. Ventilation is the most critical part of the environment and includes the intake and exhaust of air. Fresh air is required to circulate out mold spores, urine / manure fumes and dust. The ventilation must also be designed to prevent exhaust fumes from the towing vehicle from entering the trailer. Poor ventilation will result in poor air quality and overheating. Trailers can heat up quite quickly, even in the winter from the horses' body heat. Keeping airflow moving through the trailer will keep your horses at a comfortable temperature.

The best ventilation is passive and does not result in a gale force draft directly on the horse. The ventilation source should not allow rain into the trailer. It should be located in an area where the vehicle exhaust will not directly enter the trailer. As the number of horses in the trailer increases, the ventilation decreases and ventilation is worse when the trailer is stationary.

Two-way vents are best for airflow. When you want air to flow in, such as during hot weather, the vent directs air in through the opening from the front. Air can also be released to allow for circulation through vents. There has been no research on exactly how much require air inflow is ideal for horses. As a guide, stop after a half hour of travel and see if your horse is sweating and adjust accordingly.

Inside a trailer, a horse will breathe in dust from hay and bedding, vehicle exhaust, road dirt and fumes from their own urine and feces. Noxious gases including ammonia from waste and gases from the fumes of the tow vehicle can also insult the respiratory system. Ventilation must allow for the circulation of air through exhaust of stagnant air and the intake of fresh air."

Minimizing Stress During Horse Transportation
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Old 02-23-2016, 01:00 AM   #65
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Carbon Monoxide would have been the last thing I would have thought would be a problem carrying the dogs in the RV. I'm grateful to ApexBunk for this share.
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Old 02-24-2016, 04:48 PM   #66
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Originally Posted by MNtraveler View Post
Ventilation in horse trailers may be more adequate, but it also may NOT be adequate, even with respect to CO2 from horses exhaling or ambient heat levels:

Ventilation in Horse Trailers | Equinews

http://pubag.nal.usda.gov/pubag/down...53&content=PDF

Horse Trailer World : Trailer Talk : TRailer Ventilation


Carbon monoxide deaths of horses in horse trailers have been repeatedly reported:

Horse Trailer World : Trailer Talk : Carbon Monoxide Deaths - Again.


Adequacy of ventilation (for multiple reasons) is discussed on many equine health and safety web sites, for example from the Horse Welfare Alliance of Canada:

"The environment within a trailer includes temperature, air quality and humidity levels. Ventilation is the most critical part of the environment and includes the intake and exhaust of air. Fresh air is required to circulate out mold spores, urine / manure fumes and dust. The ventilation must also be designed to prevent exhaust fumes from the towing vehicle from entering the trailer. Poor ventilation will result in poor air quality and overheating. Trailers can heat up quite quickly, even in the winter from the horses' body heat. Keeping airflow moving through the trailer will keep your horses at a comfortable temperature.

The best ventilation is passive and does not result in a gale force draft directly on the horse. The ventilation source should not allow rain into the trailer. It should be located in an area where the vehicle exhaust will not directly enter the trailer. As the number of horses in the trailer increases, the ventilation decreases and ventilation is worse when the trailer is stationary.

Two-way vents are best for airflow. When you want air to flow in, such as during hot weather, the vent directs air in through the opening from the front. Air can also be released to allow for circulation through vents. There has been no research on exactly how much require air inflow is ideal for horses. As a guide, stop after a half hour of travel and see if your horse is sweating and adjust accordingly.

Inside a trailer, a horse will breathe in dust from hay and bedding, vehicle exhaust, road dirt and fumes from their own urine and feces. Noxious gases including ammonia from waste and gases from the fumes of the tow vehicle can also insult the respiratory system. Ventilation must allow for the circulation of air through exhaust of stagnant air and the intake of fresh air."

Minimizing Stress During Horse Transportation
In 2006 when the first article was written air pollution controls were not as stringent as they are now especially when it concerns diesel engines...no more black smoke like the old days...
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Old 02-24-2016, 05:01 PM   #67
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Black smoke is mostly impurities (particulates) so that's a big improvement. Carbon monoxide is unavoidable as I understand it; also invisible. Although there is much less CO in diesel exhaust than gas engines, it can still be lethal. From PubMed:

Diesel fumes do kill: a case of fatal carbon monoxide poisoning directly attributed to diesel fuel exhaust with a 10-year retrospective case and literature review
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