Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-17-2013, 10:08 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
mike06081969's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by rattleNsmoke View Post
Keep this in mind. Now that you have a fiver that most likely is 12+ feet high, have a keen second set of eyes on overhead obstacles like tree branches and gas station overhangs. Hitting one of those will ruin your whole day.
Good point. My fiver has the second A/C unit above the front bedroom, making it 12'6" high. I pulled in a Sam's the day I bought the thing to get diesel and hit the A/C on the sign displaying the maximum vehicle height, lol. Lucky they had it there, because otherwise I would have been down to one A/C unit if I'd pulled on up to the pumps.
__________________

__________________
Mike in Tennessee
Former 2 time FR owner
2007 Crossroads Cruiser 30QB Fifth Wheel
2008 F-250 Lariat 4x4 6.4 Powerstroke
Firestone Ride-Rites w/cab control
mike06081969 is offline  
Old 01-18-2013, 12:34 AM   #12
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Oregon
Posts: 80
Send a message via ICQ to ByronCR Send a message via AIM to ByronCR Send a message via MSN to ByronCR Send a message via Yahoo to ByronCR Send a message via Skype™ to ByronCR
I went from a 28ft TT to a 35ft 5ver just last week. I had never towed or backed up a 5ver before and towing was a lot easier. I found that it does track a bit more on the inside turns but nothing too bad. Backing up I found to be easier but it did take me awhile to back the 5ver down the side of my house which is only 10ft wide. I found that I have to pivot the trailer sooner so I can back it down the side of the house instead of pivoting the TT at the last minute. Once I figured that out it was easy.

One thing I noticed and I might get around it the more I back it up, but in narrow areas, its not as easy to get the trailer to move over to either side. But then again, I am backing mine into a fairly tight area.
__________________

__________________
Byron R
2013 Columbus 295RL
2006 F350 6.0L Crew Cab LB SRW
ByronCR is offline  
Old 01-18-2013, 09:10 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
Oaklevel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Virginia
Posts: 3,529
I agree with all the posts..... going forward is much easier, backing took a little more getting adjusted to but one time did it. I currently own 5 trailers (only for fun) everything from a 10 foot long box trailer to a 35 ft 5er toyhauler......... I always have to adust from one to the other but I can tell you I would rather back up the 35' toyhauler than the 10 long box or open trailer. Just practice & you will never want to go back to a bumper pull.................
__________________
Oaklevel is online now  
Old 01-18-2013, 10:09 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: X
Posts: 2,781
One thing a friend told me for my first 5er backing has been very helpful. It's better/easier to start the angle between the tow & trailer while you're still driving forward. If you're backing into a slot on the passenger side, while still going forward, make a sharp turn to the left side of the road, and then straighten out. Your trailer will now be at an angle to the tow, and if you timed it right, the rear of the trailer is now ready to back into the slot.
__________________
BarryD0706 is offline  
Old 01-18-2013, 11:35 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Midland, MI
Posts: 626
Ditto to most of what's been said already...I went from a 30 TT to a 35 FW and found it very easy to adjust to the change. That said, I will offer 2 additional observations for what they are worth:
  1. I find myself turnning the wheel alot more to make back-up position adjustments. I don't think I would have even been too aware of this if it were not for a increase in the number and depths of the truck tire 'ruts' that I'm now digging in my side lawn while parking at the end of a trip.
  2. As reviously mentioned be aware of your height. I'm ok going under signs, overpasses, etc,..anything that is labled but what for tree branches. Almost lost my antenna the last time out.
__________________
Cathy & Jeff
Midland, Michigan
2013 Sabre 32RCTS / 2012 Ram2500 Hemi
SimchaSabre is offline  
Old 01-18-2013, 12:22 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
jevanb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Michigan
Posts: 1,441
Quote:
Originally Posted by SimchaSabre View Post
Ditto to most of what's been said already...I went from a 30 TT to a 35 FW and found it very easy to adjust to the change. That said, I will offer 2 additional observations for what they are worth:
  1. I find myself turnning the wheel alot more to make back-up position adjustments. I don't think I would have even been too aware of this if it were not for a increase in the number and depths of the truck tire 'ruts' that I'm now digging in my side lawn while parking at the end of a trip.
  2. As reviously mentioned be aware of your height. I'm ok going under signs, overpasses, etc,..anything that is labled but what for tree branches. Almost lost my antenna the last time out.
same here, I took mine into the city and drove all around (nerve racking) but I learned a lot about how it handles in tight crowded strip malls and city streets. I would never do that with the TT. mine is 39 ft overall
__________________
2012 Wildcat 344QB

06 LBZ ,CC 4x
lots of mods
Superglide
jevanb is offline  
Old 01-18-2013, 01:39 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
camper1999's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 778
I find my fifth wheel is much easier to drive then my old 33 foot travel trailer. Going forward, as most have already stated, it is like night and day. My fifth wheel is like it is not even back there when I am on the highway. Turning is a little different but you will find it easier. Where I needed to do some learning on was backing mine up. It does track differently then the travel trailer and you need to begin turning out of a turn, when backing, earlier. Go on youtube and check out some of the clips on backing up a semi. It is the same concept and helped me.
__________________
2012 Cedar Creek Silverback 29RE
2011 GMC 2500HD Diesel
camper1999 is offline  
Old 01-18-2013, 02:09 PM   #18
Fulltime family RVer
 
ependydad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 14,759
It's the whole "different pivot point" thing that took my wife and I a bit to understand. I mean, it's obvious that the hitch is in the bed vs. behind the truck, but turning that to real world understanding took some time. It finally made sense when someone said the obvious - the trailer won't turn until the hitch moves. On a bumper-pull, the hitch point moves almost immediately with a turn since the back of the truck moves side ways opposite to the front. On a FW, the hitch point doesn't move until the truck has moved backwards a few feet and the turn is underway. Meaning, the trailer won't start turning right away - you need some lead time before it does.

I have posted here before, getting tips and advice. The rest is practice... Basically, I found that I would basically waggle the truck this way and that, over-correcting on each side. Like camper1999 said, you need to begin turning out of a turn earlier when backing. I didn't realize this and would end up over turning on one side, to turn the wheel a ton the other way and would do it on that side.

Just takes patience and practice. Unfortunately, I have a lot of the first and not much time for the latter - so my "practice" is generally in the campground, providing as MUCH entertainment as possible to all around me.

For turning when going forwards - my dealer took me for a test drive before sending me off with my camper. Their tech sat shotgun and gave me tips since I was coming from a pop-up. The best thing he told me with ensuring that I wouldn't hop curbs is to watch the trailer tires - once they pass whatever obstacle there is, you can cut the wheel as sharp as needed. It gave me a good judge for how *wide* of a turn I needed to make.
__________________
2012 Ram 3500 DRW/crew cab/long bed/4x4/4.10 gears pulling an early 2013 Sabre 36QBOK
Checkout my site for RVing tips, tricks, and info | My family and I have fulltimed since June 2015
ependydad is online now  
Old 01-18-2013, 08:23 PM   #19
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 88
Thanks for all the replies the information will be a great start guess I could use some hitch up pointers also. I have read about something called high hitching and I am really interested in the device to prevent the hitch from coming out and dropping in the bed. Learned so much from the replies thank you all again. I am to be at the dealership tomorrow at nine to start the hitch install. The camper walk through is scheduled for about one and a couple of hours later I will be headed home. I am nervous, excited, scared, and dozens of other emotions. Don't turn short and hit the curd. Don't drive under something short and destroy your AC. Remember the pivot point is closer and responds slower when backing. This doesn't sound easier then my tt.
Thanks for everything JT.
__________________
Jtant is offline  
Old 01-18-2013, 09:28 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
JDWeir's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: In the desert
Posts: 149
I am sure others will chime in, but here is my procedure.

Back up to the trailer making sure that your tailgate is down or off and, at least on my hitch, I pull the hitch lever out to put the locking jaws out of the way to accept the king pin, your hitch may vary on this. The hitch plate of the trailer should be slightly ( 1/2 to 1 inch or so) lower than the flat area of the hitch plate in the tow vehicle. The trailer hitch should "climb" the angled portion of the tow vehicle hitch to rest on the flat area. This prevents "high pinning" or "high hitching". Visually inspect the hitch from the rear confirming that the king pin is captured by the jaws of the hitch and that the hitch is in the locked position. Plug in the light/brake cable, then raise the landing gear just until the pads are an inch or so above the ground (or blocks if used). Then either leave the wheel chocks under the trailer wheels or use the brake controller to apply just the trailer brakes and try to ease away. If properly hitched, the tow rig will not move. If it does, the trailer will only drop an inch or so before the landing gear pads touch the ground or blocks. This prevents the trailer from dropping down onto the truck box. Once the hitch up is verified, turn on the 4 way flashers and do a walk around to check lights. This will activate the bulb elements used for turn signals and brake lights. Then turn the 4 way flashers off and turn on the park lights to check the remaining bulb elements. I use these walk arounds to verify that all storage doors are closed and locked, check the entry door, tv antenna, rear stabilizers if so equipped, tires and rims of both the trailer and tow vehicle, items tied onto the rear of the trailer or on a rear platform and just a general look over to make sure that both rigs are ready for travel.

I know, kind of a long post, but you get the idea. You will most certainly develop your own routine to make sure that things are ready for travel.

__________________

__________________
TV, 2000 Dodge RAM 2500 Quad cab short bed, Cummins 5.9, Edge Comp, Gauges.
5ver, 2011 Palamino Sabre 31 RETS.
JDWeir is offline  
Closed Thread

Tags
5er

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:07 PM.