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Old 08-10-2013, 01:10 AM   #1
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AC problem

It is 1 AM and just a few min ago our bedroom (zone 1) unit just started spitting out little bitty pieces of ice and a little water has dripped onto the Ned and floor. I ran fan on high for about 5 min and just cut it off. Our other unit In the lower section is running fine currently.

What causes this? I Had it set on 73 not too cold...
I cut if off for now. It was very hot today. But, isn't that why we got AC is don't need it when it ain't hot

What to do?

FYI: I had the main bottom unit replaced when the unit was one month old last fall.

Something seems to always go wrong! Ughh!
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Old 08-10-2013, 05:50 AM   #2
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froze up. let it sit for a few minutes. keep fan on high. open all vents. be happy.
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Old 08-10-2013, 07:31 AM   #3
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I agree you have a frozen coil.

The problem is high humidity in the camper and low air flow in the ducts. This allows the incoming water laden air to freeze on the coils reducing the air flow even more.

It will seem to stop working well so the user will steadily decrease the temperature thinking the unit needs to "run more" to get better.

In reality, it needs to "run less" so the condensate water can run off.

The solution is to INCREASE the temperature on the thermostat; not decrease it. By running the compressor less often, the water gets a chance to drip off the coils and be removed from the camper.

As a "rule of thumb" I never set the thermostat lower than 10 degrees below outside air temperature (max setting 90 degrees). This allows the unit to cycle properly and remove the water from the air without freezing.

If it is 90 outside (for example), the unit should be set NO LOWER than 80. You will still be cool inside because the air is DRY and cooler than outside. (OBTW this technique will save you a FORTUNE in air conditioning costs at home too.)

If the temperature is 110 outside; set 90 and take what you get.
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Old 08-10-2013, 10:36 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by herk7769 View Post
I agree you have a frozen coil.

The problem is high humidity in the camper and low air flow in the ducts. This allows the incoming water laden air to freeze on the coils reducing the air flow even more.

It will seem to stop working well so the user will steadily decrease the temperature thinking the unit needs to "run more" to get better.

In reality, it needs to "run less" so the condensate water can run off.

The solution is to INCREASE the temperature on the thermostat; not decrease it. By running the compressor less often, the water gets a chance to drip off the coils and be removed from the camper.

As a "rule of thumb" I never set the thermostat lower than 10 degrees below outside air temperature (max setting 90 degrees). This allows the unit to cycle properly and remove the water from the air without freezing.

If it is 90 outside (for example), the unit should be set NO LOWER than 80. You will still be cool inside because the air is DRY and cooler than outside. (OBTW this technique will save you a FORTUNE in air conditioning costs at home too.)

If the temperature is 110 outside; set 90 and take what you get.
X2 and that being said, a properly designed AC unit with sufficient airflow will rarely, if ever freeze up. Problem is that the ducted units constrain the airflow so much that the evaporator freezes up easily, hence HERC's recommendation. If you have a ducted unit (most do nowadays) and the central vent on the unit, OPEN that vent all the way whenever it is hot and humid. Not much else you can do except make sure the unit IS cycling frequently by setting the thermostat up till it does.

Sad but true.
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Old 08-10-2013, 10:41 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by garbonz View Post

X2 and that being said, a properly designed AC unit with sufficient airflow will rarely, if ever freeze up. Problem is that the ducted units constrain the airflow so much that the evaporator freezes up easily, hence HERC's recommendation. If you have a ducted unit (most do nowadays) and the central vent on the unit, OPEN that vent all the way whenever it is hot and humid. Not much else you can do except make sure the unit IS cycling frequently by setting the thermostat up till it does.

Sad but true.
Central vent??? Is that the slider thing that forces more air into the ducts?
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Old 08-10-2013, 10:56 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krisbarger View Post

Central vent??? Is that the slider thing that forces more air into the ducts?
Yep.
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Old 08-10-2013, 10:59 AM   #7
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Yep.
You are saying keep this open? Last night I closed it becAuse both ends of the unit needed more air. This was mainly because I cut the bedroom unit off.
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Old 08-10-2013, 11:00 AM   #8
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With all the above being said, a dirty air filter can cause this also. Anything that restricts the air flow can cause freeze up.
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Old 08-10-2013, 11:15 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krisbarger View Post

Central vent??? Is that the slider thing that forces more air into the ducts?
Yep, thats it. Open it all the way and your freeze up problem will be reduced.
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Old 08-10-2013, 11:17 AM   #10
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With all the above being said, a dirty air filter can cause this also. Anything that restricts the air flow can cause freeze up.
Oh Yeah remove the filter as it is another source of resistance and it doesn't do anything except remove the big chunks that you wouldn't breathe anyway. If you are concerned about air filtration get a HEPA tabletop unit instead.
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