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Old 11-22-2013, 07:22 PM   #91
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During my early years in the Navy (circa ~1980's) a friend of mine told me about a story of an A-7 Corsair landing on the wrong carrier during Vietnam. I just googled it and found it with a picture and write up. US Navy A-7 Corsair II Units of the Vietnam War - Peter Mersky - Google Books

It is unfortunate for the crew of the Dreamlifter. Although I agree that this event has a high potential to happen anyday, it will interesting to hear how this event took place.

Youtube on occasion tries to show a C-17 that landed at the wrong ariport in Florida.
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Old 11-22-2013, 07:39 PM   #92
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Tony always makes me think.
I needed to refresh my memory on how this worked.

I discovered the first two digits of the USAF Tail number is actually the Fiscal Year the particular aircraft was paid for (funded) and not when it was delivered (made) or the contract run was signed.

A multi-year contract can be signed, but each year's budget only funds the production authorized for that year. Thus a contract run can span more than on year. For example the 1961 Lockheed C-130E contract for 496 E Models spans tail numbers from 62-XXXX through 63-XXXX.

"Starting on July 1, 1921 (the beginning of FY 1922) a new serial number system was adopted based on procurement within each Fiscal Year. Each serial number now consisted of a base number corresponding to the last two digits of the FY in which money was allocated to manufacture the aircraft, and a sequence number indicating the sequential order in which the particular aircraft was ordered within that particular FY. For example, airplane 22-1 was the first aircraft ordered in FY 1922, 23-1 was the first example ordered in FY 1923, etc. This system is still in use today.

It is important to recognize that the serial number reflects the Fiscal Year in which the order for the aircraft is placed, NOT the year in which it is delivered. Nowadays, the difference between the time the order is placed and the time the aircraft is actually delivered can be as much as several years."
From: USASC-USAAS-USAAC-USAAF-USAF Aircraft Serial Numbers--1908 to Present

This only applies to Air Force Aircraft. Navy uses "Bureau Numbers" for example.

Learn something new every day...
"Tony always makes me think" - I'll take that as a compliment.

Yes Joe Baugher is my Go To Guy for military aircraft information such as this. He may be the holder of the worlds "Man With Too Much Time On His Hands" title,but I like reading his articles.

Note that he uses the term "Serial Number (s)" somewhat more than "Tail Number (s)", but he does use them both interchangeably.

I got interested in this topic when I first noticed different Serial Numbers on different B47 bombers when I was in the Air Force. I did some research and found that the Air Force needed so many of the aircraft that Boeing contracted with two other manufacturers to meet the demand and those aircraft were numbered in an unique way - but that's another story.
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Old 11-30-2013, 11:52 AM   #93
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Old 11-30-2013, 12:37 PM   #94
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I have said that landing at the wrong airport,either civil or military,has happened before, but it's seems like it's getting to be a habit.
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Old 11-30-2013, 01:04 PM   #95
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I have said that landing at the wrong airport,either civil or military,has happened before, but it's seems like it's getting to be a habit.
I wonder if they get a tattoo to commemorate the event....
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Old 11-30-2013, 01:06 PM   #96
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I wonder if they get a tattoo to commemorate the event....
A tattoo is going to be the least they get
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Old 11-30-2013, 01:08 PM   #97
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I don't know what all the commotion is about - the C17 is made for short field landings and take offs (STOL) and this simply proves it.
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Old 11-30-2013, 03:07 PM   #98
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Landing on the wrong carrier or airport? How about landing on the enemy's carrier?

There was an instance in WWII of a pilot almost landing on one the enemy's carriers. The landing signal officer noticed that the pilot was responding to his signals incorrectly. The Japanese too-high and too-low signals were backwards from ours. The pilot figured it out, too, and made a quick departure.

Sorry but I can't remember if the pilot was American or Japanese. Any Navy history experts out there?
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Old 11-30-2013, 03:59 PM   #99
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Landing on the wrong carrier or airport? How about landing on the enemy's carrier?

There was an instance in WWII of a pilot almost landing on one the enemy's carriers. The landing signal officer noticed that the pilot was responding to his signals incorrectly. The Japanese too-high and too-low signals were backwards from ours. The pilot figured it out, too, and made a quick departure.

Sorry but I can't remember if the pilot was American or Japanese. Any Navy history experts out there?
I'm not a Navy expert (never could figure out their rank/insignia/titles), but I sure admire those carrier pilots for what they do in all kinds of weather.
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Old 11-30-2013, 11:15 PM   #100
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I avoided the navy because I didn't want to be called a seaman. Or coxswain. Or bosons mate. Won't even talk about admirals.......
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