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Old 10-12-2012, 08:56 AM   #81
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Although not camping related, I've got a question about lenses.

Does anyone shoot with manual lenses anymore? My Sony Nex can use most any lens ever made with an adapter and I'm thinking of buying one or two legacy lenses - one would be a wide-angle 10-18mm 2.8 (landscapes) and the other would be a 200mm 2.8 prime (indoor volleyball). Been a long time since I used manual and these new cameras have spoiled me with the auto-focussing and stabilization, but some of that legacy glass is 10-15 times less the price of new.
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Old 10-12-2012, 08:59 AM   #82
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I will turn the auto-focus off if the picture demands it....does that count ??
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Old 10-12-2012, 09:04 AM   #83
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I will turn the auto-focus off if the picture demands it....does that count ??
That counts. When do you like to manual focus and do you find you focus quicker and better without it?
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Old 10-12-2012, 09:22 AM   #84
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I will use manaul focus when:

I expect something to be in a certain place. I did that for some hummingbird pictures. I knew which limb he perched on, prefocused on that limb, and got the shot.

When I am chasing a butterfly or moth across the yard. I will preset the focus on how I think the shot will develop, and the fine tune the focus when the shot happens. Using auto-focus uses a second or 2 to lock on.......and that is "if" you can get the critter in your lens focal point.

Taking a distant "quick" shot through close foliage. Even though I mostly use my center focal point, while lining up the camera for the shot it will sometimes focus on the foliage instead of the subject. Using manual will get me ahead of the game.

With a fairly close shot with open aperture, sometimes I do not want what is at center of the frame to be my main focus. My camera has the ability to focus on something, leave the shutter button 1/2 down, move the camera, and the focus will stay the same. But sometimes manual focus just makes more sense.

When there are 2 subjects at either side, but I am shooting up the middle. Again, locking in on 1 subject, leaving the shutter button 1/2 down and moving the camera would work, but I would probably use manual focus again for that shot.

My previous SLRs did not have auto-focus functions, so using the manual mode on this camera just feels natural....but I gotta admit, I am really liking auto-focus.
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Old 10-12-2012, 09:31 AM   #85
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Think of focusing as like transmissions. Some times, when you are being lazy and just want to get from point a to point b, an automatic is the way to go, but when you are driving for the experience of driving, then there is no substitute for a manual. I confess that I tend to let the camera focus on most shots, but I do switch to manual every now and then, just to keep the skills up.

I will say this, I would never, ever, ever pass on a quality piece of glass just cause it don't have auto-focus.

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Old 10-12-2012, 10:20 AM   #86
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Pictures shot with my Canon EOS 50D on our shake down trip thru Northern Washington in our brand new 2013 Cedar Creek 30 RL





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Old 10-12-2012, 10:29 AM   #87
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtnguy View Post
I will use manaul focus when:

I expect something to be in a certain place. I did that for some hummingbird pictures. I knew which limb he perched on, prefocused on that limb, and got the shot.

When I am chasing a butterfly or moth across the yard. I will preset the focus on how I think the shot will develop, and the fine tune the focus when the shot happens. Using auto-focus uses a second or 2 to lock on.......and that is "if" you can get the critter in your lens focal point.

Taking a distant "quick" shot through close foliage. Even though I mostly use my center focal point, while lining up the camera for the shot it will sometimes focus on the foliage instead of the subject. Using manual will get me ahead of the game.

With a fairly close shot with open aperture, sometimes I do not want what is at center of the frame to be my main focus. My camera has the ability to focus on something, leave the shutter button 1/2 down, move the camera, and the focus will stay the same. But sometimes manual focus just makes more sense.

When there are 2 subjects at either side, but I am shooting up the middle. Again, locking in on 1 subject, leaving the shutter button 1/2 down and moving the camera would work, but I would probably use manual focus again for that shot.

My previous SLRs did not have auto-focus functions, so using the manual mode on this camera just feels natural....but I gotta admit, I am really liking auto-focus.
Excellent. I have relied maybe too much on auto-focus in some of these same scenarios. And, you have confirmed my thought that I'm not giving up a huge amount with manual and that it could be a better solution in some cases even when I have a choice.
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Old 10-12-2012, 10:30 AM   #88
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Think of focusing as like transmissions. Some times, when you are being lazy and just want to get from point a to point b, an automatic is the way to go, but when you are driving for the experience of driving, then there is no substitute for a manual. I confess that I tend to let the camera focus on most shots, but I do switch to manual every now and then, just to keep the skills up.

I will say this, I would never, ever, ever pass on a quality piece of glass just cause it don't have auto-focus.

Tim
That's a great analogy. And, you further confirmed it for me about the lack of auto-focus with these lenses. There are some great glass at a fraction of the cost of buying new. They often do not have the bells and whistles, but the optics are what I am looking for.
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Old 10-12-2012, 10:30 AM   #89
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Pictures shot with my Canon EOS 50D on our shake down trip thru Northern Washington in our brand new 2013 Cedar Creek 30 RL
Gorgeous pictures torben. Besides the scenery, your 5er looks great!
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Old 10-12-2012, 02:39 PM   #90
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Triguy View Post
Although not camping related, I've got a question about lenses.

Does anyone shoot with manual lenses anymore? My Sony Nex can use most any lens ever made with an adapter and I'm thinking of buying one or two legacy lenses - one would be a wide-angle 10-18mm 2.8 (landscapes) and the other would be a 200mm 2.8 prime (indoor volleyball). Been a long time since I used manual and these new cameras have spoiled me with the auto-focussing and stabilization, but some of that legacy glass is 10-15 times less the price of new.
Hi Triguy

I use manual focus 'prime' lenses most of the time. I have a Nikon D7000 which can use the older MF lenses and still fully 'meter' . There are some big advantages to the MF prime lenses, most importantly the large apertures that many (most) have. A lot of newer, less expensive lenses have relatively small maximum apertures of f4-5.6 and this has two negative effects - 1) there is a lot less light transmitted through the lens so you tend to have to use slower shutter speeds and/or higher ISO, especially when hand-holding. Also, the lower light transmission affects how easy it is to see your scene through the viewfinder (less a worry if you only compose on the lcd screen). 2) The smaller maximum aperture does not allow for as much control over 'Depth Of Field'. This is especially noticeable in portrait shots - the background does not blur as much as it should, thus the portrait does not stand out the way it could.

Many MF prime lenses have maximum apertures of f2.8 and larger. Many 50mm lenses are f1.8 or even f1.4 (f1.2 if you want to spend some real money). You wont even recognize your viewfinder when you mount one of these 'fast' lenses - everything is very bright and makes for very easy focusing. I have 24mm, 28mm, 35mm, 50mm, 55mm, 85mm & 105mm all in manual focus prime lenses and I love them all on the new digital body. I do have some AF lenses (28-70mm f2.8, 50mm f1.8 and 80-200mm f2.8) and for certain scenarios (sports, weddings etc) they are certainly the weapon of choice - but for my regular photography I do not leave home without the prime lenses. The quality of these older lenses is first rate and the ruggedness tends to be top notch as well.
A quality lens affects your image more than the camera body - so if you can leverage some of these prime lenses you won't go wrong. I would suggest you try a 50mm prime lens first - they are very cheap used and the quality is usually first rate (Nikon or Canon). It would let you get your feet wet without spending a lot of cash.
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