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-   -   How many of us towing 5W with 1/2 Ton? (http://www.forestriverforums.com/forums/f12/how-many-of-us-towing-5w-with-1-2-ton-25745.html)

camper_Lucy 07-06-2012 01:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dretired (Post 218919)
Attachment 16176 Towing with a 1/2 ton....i am not sure if a properly equipped F150 should even be in that category anymore..:confused: :thumbsup:

FYI,
the concept of 1/2, 3/4, 1 Ton does not really apply any more. Here is the new scale and it is by class. The classes apply to Personal and Commercial and this now how states regulate and control things. Hence when you see someone post a comment about and overloaded TV and TT combo, this is where they will refer to the class regulations on the states books to ticket you if you happen to be in an accident or other event where an officer would show up. But most think that since they are personal TV and not required to pull into scales that there is a difference between the two and the weights do not apply to them, they are wrong.

Light Duty
[edit]Class 1
The Class 1 truck gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) ranges from 0 to 6,000 pounds (0 to 2,722 kg).[1] Examples of trucks in this class include the Toyota Tacoma, Dodge Dakota and GMC Canyon.[4][5]
[edit]Class 2
The Class 2 truck gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) ranges from 6,001 to 10,000 pounds (2,722 to 4,536 kg).[1] Examples of vehicles in this class include the Dodge Ram 1500 and the Ford F-150. Class 2 is subdivided into Class 2a and Class 2b, with class 2a being 6,001 to 8,500 pounds (2,722 to 3,856 kg) pounds, and class 2b being 8,501 to 10,000 pounds (3,856 to 4,536 kg) pounds. Class 2a is commonly referred to as a light duty truck, with class 2b being the lowest heavy-duty class, also called the light heavy-duty class.[5][6] [7]
[edit]Class 3
The Class 3 truck gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) ranges from 10,001 to 14,000 pounds (4,536 to 6,350 kg).[8] Examples of vehicles in this class include the Dodge Ram 3500, Ford F-350 and the GMC Sierra 3500, both dual rear wheel and single rear wheel.[5] The Hummer H1 is another example of a single rear wheel Class 3 truck, with a GVWR of 10,300 lbs.
[edit]Medium Duty
[edit]Class 4
The Class 4 truck gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) ranges from 14,001 to 16,000 pounds (6,351 to 7,257 kg).[8] Examples of vehicles in this class include select Ford F-450 trucks, Dodge Ram 4500, and the GMC 4500.[5]
[edit]Class 5
The Class 5 truck gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) ranges from 16,001 to 19,500 pounds (7,258 to 8,845 kg).[8] Examples of trucks in this class include the International TerraStar, GMC 5500.[9] Dodge Ram 5500, and the Ford F-550
[edit]Class 6
The Class 6 truck gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) ranges from 19,501 to 26,000 pounds (8,846 to 11,793 kg). Examples of trucks in this class include the International Durastar, GMC Topkick C6500.[10] and the Ford F-650

camper_Lucy 07-06-2012 01:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by boubou (Post 218180)
What's the chucking caused by an how does it get fixed?
Also, I understand about pin weight on TT is fixed but how does pin weight work on 5th wheel? Can that be changed by moving cargo to the back of
The unit and how much of that pin weigh gets (little as it may be) transferred to front axle?
Picking up Jayco Eagle Superlite HT(half ton towable) 23.5 tomorrow and will report on it on this specific thread.

It's my understanding, (maybe incorrectly) that most chucking is caused by one of two things, a nose high Trailer, or to light of pin weight.
I do know that I solved my slight chucking by readjusting my load and moving weight forward in the TT. I determined I was a little pin light after going to the scale. My unit was all ready level.

Rsgtivr6 07-06-2012 02:52 PM

The thought process of "it pulls fine, therefore, it is fine" is not always correct. The engines are rarely the limiting factor these days. Even some naturally aspirated 6 cylinder engines are outdoing hp and tq numbers of yesteryear 8s. It's the components attached to that engine that limit your ability. Something as small as the bearings used will drop GVWR by hundreds. You have to take the truck as a whole into consideration.

I am not your parent and I wont lose sleep over the issue, but I don't want to read a thread later about "I blew my brakes out down the hill with my 1500 and 5er this weekend." All I am trying to point out is if you do decide to exceed manufacturers ratings and injure yourself or others, don't expect the insurance company ignore an out on payout if they find out, nor a lawyer to miss a payday. I sure know I will push the issue if I knew the TV/TT combo that wrecked me was overloaded.

The numbers are there for a reason, and even if you think it can pull more, it doesn't mean it can do so reliably nor safely. As most agree, the manufacturer does put the ratings out because that's what they determine to be the safe capacity to reliably load the truck to. Why chance your family, my family, and/or your expensive rig on a hunch that they are wrong?

dretired 07-06-2012 03:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by camper_Lucy (Post 218947)
FYI,
the concept of 1/2, 3/4, 1 Ton does not really apply any more. Here is the new scale and it is by class. The classes apply to Personal and Commercial and this now how states regulate and control things. Hence when you see someone post a comment about and overloaded TV and TT combo, this is where they will refer to the class regulations on the states books to ticket you if you happen to be in an accident or other event where an officer would show up. But most think that since they are personal TV and not required to pull into scales that there is a difference between the two and the weights do not apply to them, they are wrong.

Light Duty
[edit]Class 1
The Class 1 truck gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) ranges from 0 to 6,000 pounds (0 to 2,722 kg).[1] Examples of trucks in this class include the Toyota Tacoma, Dodge Dakota and GMC Canyon.[4][5]
[edit]Class 2
The Class 2 truck gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) ranges from 6,001 to 10,000 pounds (2,722 to 4,536 kg).[1] Examples of vehicles in this class include the Dodge Ram 1500 and the Ford F-150. Class 2 is subdivided into Class 2a and Class 2b, with class 2a being 6,001 to 8,500 pounds (2,722 to 3,856 kg) pounds, and class 2b being 8,501 to 10,000 pounds (3,856 to 4,536 kg) pounds. Class 2a is commonly referred to as a light duty truck, with class 2b being the lowest heavy-duty class, also called the light heavy-duty class.[5][6] [7]
[edit]Class 3
The Class 3 truck gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) ranges from 10,001 to 14,000 pounds (4,536 to 6,350 kg).[8] Examples of vehicles in this class include the Dodge Ram 3500, Ford F-350 and the GMC Sierra 3500, both dual rear wheel and single rear wheel.[5] The Hummer H1 is another example of a single rear wheel Class 3 truck, with a GVWR of 10,300 lbs.
[edit]Medium Duty
[edit]Class 4
The Class 4 truck gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) ranges from 14,001 to 16,000 pounds (6,351 to 7,257 kg).[8] Examples of vehicles in this class include select Ford F-450 trucks, Dodge Ram 4500, and the GMC 4500.[5]
[edit]Class 5
The Class 5 truck gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) ranges from 16,001 to 19,500 pounds (7,258 to 8,845 kg).[8] Examples of trucks in this class include the International TerraStar, GMC 5500.[9] Dodge Ram 5500, and the Ford F-550
[edit]Class 6
The Class 6 truck gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) ranges from 19,501 to 26,000 pounds (8,846 to 11,793 kg). Examples of trucks in this class include the International Durastar, GMC Topkick C6500.[10] and the Ford F-650

So.. which class would my truck be in ?? with a 9,800 lb tow rating for 5th wheel / TT ??:confused:

pwrstroke2012 07-06-2012 05:30 PM

I had an 09' F150 with the max trailer tow package that was rated to tow 11,300# according to Ford brochure. I used it to tow a 30' Rockwood TT that is 7000# UVW and used a Equalizer WDH, installed Firestone air bags and thought I would be well within limitations. After towing with it for 3 years I bought a 2012 F350 Diesel and couldn't be happier with the switch. The deciding factor came is when I had the F150 bed loaded with 2 sets of SCUBA gear along with tanks, 5 passengers, and a minimally loaded trailer. It was a white knuckle experience to say the least and when we made it home I went truck shopping. The motor was plenty strong in the 150 (5.4L) I was just expecting better handling. I feel so much more secure towing with my family having the heavier truck

OldCoot 07-06-2012 06:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pwrstroke2012 (Post 219021)
I had an 09' F150 with the max trailer tow package that was rated to tow 11,300# according to Ford brochure. I used it to tow a 30' Rockwood TT that is 7000# UVW and used a Equalizer WDH, installed Firestone air bags and thought I would be well within limitations. After towing with it for 3 years I bought a 2012 F350 Diesel and couldn't be happier with the switch. The deciding factor came is when I had the F150 bed loaded with 2 sets of SCUBA gear along with tanks, 5 passengers, and a minimally loaded trailer. It was a white knuckle experience to say the least and when we made it home I went truck shopping. The motor was plenty strong in the 150 (5.4L) I was just expecting better handling. I feel so much more secure towing with my family having the heavier truck

Big difference between a TT and a 5er. It is a much more stable trailer that is virtually unaffected by passing semi's, mh, buses, etc. The 5er is a dream to pull compared to the 7 TT we've had since 1976 that all had dual friction sway controls and the Reese WDH.

pwb01 07-06-2012 06:59 PM

F150 6 cyl, see below. The ecoboost pulls the 8000# 5th wheel with absolutely no problem. Keeps up with traffic and never slows down on hills.

with Max tow package:
Pin wt cap 2200
3:73 rear end 11,300 tow max
365hp
420 ft lbs torque
built in brake controller with sway detector/auto brake
hill hold braking system
extending mirrors with blind spot mirrors
36 gal tank and economy of a 6 cyl (11.5mpg towing Rocky)

perfect for ultra light 5th wheel (mine is 7000# empty)

pwrstroke2012 07-06-2012 07:23 PM

dunnnc, I understand the difference that the 5er tows better than the TT no doubt, but the p metric tire they put on most 1/2 tons are not made for heavy loads. I am thinking weight is weight no matter if you pull a TT, 5ver or a wooden dutch shoe. I was tired of wondering if I was overloaded or if I could stop the trailer (any trailer) if my trailer brakes went out. It boils down to what you feel comfortable with.

boubou 07-06-2012 07:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dunnnc

Big difference between a TT and a 5er. It is a much more stable trailer that is virtually unaffected by passing semi's, mh, buses, etc. The 5er is a dream to pull compared to the 7 TT we've had since 1976 that all had dual friction sway controls and the Reese WDH.

Lots of 1/2 ton (and larger trucks) also overloaded with TT's just the same. It's easy to get over the payload with a large TT. Like dunnnc says, between the two, the 5er will handle the load and be more stable on the road: safer. My warped logic.

pwrstroke2012 07-06-2012 08:03 PM

BouBou, alot of difference of what is safer and what is safe. As I said, it is what you are comfortable with.


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