Forest River Forums

Forest River Forums (http://www.forestriverforums.com/forums/)
-   Towing, Tow Vehicles, Hitches & Toads (http://www.forestriverforums.com/forums/f12/)
-   -   How many of us towing 5W with 1/2 Ton? (http://www.forestriverforums.com/forums/f12/how-many-of-us-towing-5w-with-1-2-ton-25745.html)

boubou 07-04-2012 02:32 PM

How many of us towing 5W with 1/2 Ton?
 
there 's a lot of talk on forums about towing 5th wheel With half-ton trucks but it's all over the place. I'm sure I'm Not the only one looking for answers so I thought I'd Start a thread so that we could compare our experiences with such combos.
How many of us towing 5W with 1/2 Ton?
Which TT and TT?
Positive or negative experience with combo unit?
Future plans?
No need to Re-ash the talk about 3/4 and 1 ton requirement.... Looking for the other side of the coin.
Brigitte

TURBS 07-04-2012 02:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by boubou
there 's a lot of talk on forums about towing 5th wheel With half-ton trucks but it's all over the place. I'm sure I'm Not the only one looking for answers so I thought I'd Start a thread so that we could compare our experiences with such combos.
How many of us towing 5W with 1/2 Ton?
Which TT and TT?
Positive or negative experience with combo unit?
Future plans?
No need to Re-ash the talk about 3/4 and 1 ton requirement.... Looking for the other side of the coin.
Brigitte

My best friends pull a flagstaff classic ultralite 5er with there 08 ford f150 super crew short bed 8528 bhss I believe. No issues. Other than the dreaded chucking.

boubou 07-04-2012 02:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by f1100turbo

My best friends pull a flagstaff classic ultralite 5er with there 08 ford f150 super crew short bed 8528 bhss I believe. No issues. Other than the dreaded chucking.

What's the chucking caused by an how does it get fixed?
Also, I understand about pin weight on TT is fixed but how does pin weight work on 5th wheel? Can that be changed by moving cargo to the back of
The unit and how much of that pin weigh gets (little as it may be) transferred to front axle?
Picking up Jayco Eagle Superlite HT(half ton towable) 23.5 tomorrow and will report on it on this specific thread.

TURBS 07-04-2012 03:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by boubou

What's the chucking caused by an how does it get fixed?
Also, I understand about pin weight on TT is fixed but how does pin weight work on 5th wheel? Can that be changed by moving cargo to the back of
The unit and how much of that pin weigh gets (little as it may be) transferred to front axle?
Picking up Jayco Eagle Superlite HT(half ton towable) 23.5 tomorrow and will report on it on this specific thread.

Chucking imo is caused by light variable rate springs in todays trucks.
Air bags all but eliminate it.
Pin weight can somewhat be reduced by moving weight to the rear or behind axles.

boubou 07-04-2012 03:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by f1100turbo

Chucking imo is caused by light variable rate springs in todays trucks.
Air bags all but eliminate it.
Pin weight can somewhat be reduced by moving weight to the rear or behind axles.

Airbags work better than timbrens? Can we get airbag that inflate from inside truck pushing a button? (go ahead, laugh lol)?
What about the Gawr? I don't know what it's really going to be at until I weigh in but what if it's 200 lbs or so over?

TURBS 07-04-2012 03:18 PM

I can't comment on timbrens. I do in fact know air bags work!
Yes you can buy an onboard compressor and controls for in cab. To allow bags to be inflated or deflated on the fly.

RattVader 07-04-2012 03:34 PM

Brigitte,my previous tow vehicle was a 2003 Dodge Ram 1500 QC,4x4,SLT with 3:55's,CAI,and a Superchips tuner.Last trailer I towed with her was a 30ft TT. Even though she had the grunt to move her along fairly well,and when it downshifted to 3rd to make those 6-8% grades,and was screaming her lungs out,it still seemed like it could handle it fine.However (and this is just my opinion)I remember a line from a movie were the guy said,"Just because you could doesn't mean you should".It really does apply to a lot of things.After a few white knuckle experiences of the trailer doing the wagging thing,I decided that perhaps in this instance something a little bigger,which translates most times into something more capable of handling bigger loads was in order.Again just one old guy's .02

TURBS 07-04-2012 03:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RattVader
Brigitte,my previous tow vehicle was a 2003 Dodge Ram 1500,4x4,SLT with 3:55's,CAI,and a Superchips tuner.Last trailer I towed with her was a 30ft TT. Even though she had the grunt to move her along fairly well,and when it downshifted to 3rd to make those 6-8% grades,and was screaming her lungs out,it still seemed like it could handle it fine.However (and this is just my opinion)I remember a line from a movie were the guy said,

I'm on the edge of my seat what was the line?

PapaSmurf 07-04-2012 03:55 PM

I use to tow a 7,800# dry (10,000# loaded) 5th wheel with a 1/2 ton truck (2002 GMC King Cab with 2007 Wildcat 29RLBS). I Pull with this combo for over two years. The only down side I ever had was panic stopping. I changed my brake controller and eliminated 98% of my stopping issues. I did have two extra leafs added to the springs when I had the hitch installed in the bed. I would imagine I was equivalent to a 3/4 ton with the springs. Truck rode and handled OK, but when I upgraded to the Ford diesel, it was night and day difference. Now that I have crossed over, I would never go back to a 1/2 ton.

Having done it, I know it can be done... I never felt unsafe, but having used both I would not recommend it to anyone.

OldCoot 07-04-2012 03:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by boubou (Post 218161)
there 's a lot of talk on forums about towing 5th wheel With half-ton trucks but it's all over the place. I'm sure I'm Not the only one looking for answers so I thought I'd Start a thread so that we could compare our experiences with such combos.
How many of us towing 5W with 1/2 Ton?
Which TT and TT?
Positive or negative experience with combo unit?
Future plans?
No need to Re-ash the talk about 3/4 and 1 ton requirement.... Looking for the other side of the coin.
Brigitte

I am towing a 12 Flagstaff 8528 with an 05 Silverado Ext. Cab 1500 short bed with airbags & onboard compressor. Supposedly I am grossly over weight, but have towed it over 1500 miles so far and have no problems whatsoever either pulling it or stopping it. Have added shocks to the trailer and have not experienced the chucking or dophining/porpoising. The trailer follows the contour of the road and neither exaggerates or continues the action after crossing that section of wavy road. We are very pleased with the whole rig. It may wear the truck out prematurely, but at our age, we will either rebuild it or hang it up permanently and sell what's left.

Dave_Monica 07-04-2012 04:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by boubou (Post 218183)
What about the Gawr? I don't know what it's really going to be at until I weigh in but what if it's 200 lbs or so over?

A little late to be asking this now!

You should have weighed the truck, ready to camp, gassed, everyone on board. Add 200 pounds for the hitch and then you'd have known what pin weight you can carry without exceeding the RAWR.

The risk may be getting weighed if overweight is suspected. I'm not sure what the consequences may be if you're found to be over the TV's RAWR...it may be parked until corrected.

Dave

OldCoot 07-04-2012 04:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dave_Monica (Post 218216)
A little late to be asking this now!

You should have weighed the truck, ready to camp, gassed, everyone on board. Add 200 pounds for the hitch and then you'd have known what pin weight you can carry without exceeding the RAWR.

The risk may be getting weighed if overweight is suspected. I'm not sure what the consequences may be if you're found to be over the TV's RAWR...it may be parked until corrected.

Dave

Are campers required to be weighed in Canada? Never heard of a state requiring it here in the US. Could be wrong tho'.

Dave_Monica 07-04-2012 04:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dunnnc (Post 218219)
Are campers required to be weighed in Canada? Never heard of a state requiring it here in the US. Could be wrong tho'.

Weighing is not a requirement in Canada...as I said they can pull you in and weigh your set-up if they suspect that you're overloaded. We never were checked the 2 years that we towed our camper in the signature with a '05 Ram 1500...wasn't over the RAWR though either.

I did get pulled over and checked when towing my racecar trailer for lights, chains, brakes etc. I know they also weighed a lot of racecar trailers looking for overweight..part of a safety blitz.

Dave

jdadoug 07-04-2012 05:25 PM

Half ton 5R
 
Hi, I'm pulling a 28' Cardinal with my 2010 F-150 Super Cab with a 5.4 and trailer tow package, 315 gears (which get me good gas milage) but doesnt help with the pulling. I put the fifth wheel plate in myself and wished I had put in a slider. Truck pulls it pretty good, but what I allways tell everybody that ask? "Looks like you need a bigger truck?"
I only gotta pull it 30 miles to the lake!!!!:roflblack: (literally)
And outside of a short trip somewhere in Ks. I doubt I'll ever pull it to the moutains, and its also fairly flat here in KS.
Yes I get some chuckling, and yes I think I want to put some airbags on. When I drop the trailer down it lowers the truck about 1 1/2 inches. I'm satisfied with what I have, a 3/4 ton would have the same motor, just a little more springs! I probbly need to get it weighed, and also could get rid of the stuff in the basement........ but thats what I like about it the most! jdadoug

SCOC 07-04-2012 06:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dave_Monica (Post 218221)
Weighing is not a requirement in Canada...as I said they can pull you in and weigh your set-up if they suspect that you're overloaded. We never were checked the 2 years that we towed our camper in the signature with a '05 Ram 1500...wasn't over the RAWR though either.

I did get pulled over and checked when towing my racecar trailer for lights, chains, brakes etc. I know they also weighed a lot of racecar trailers looking for overweight..part of a safety blitz.

Dave

I also know of cases where campers with large trailers have been pulled over when entering Canada at the border for weight inspection. The OP is from Kingston, so I imagine camping in the US is likely.

It's also common for the OPP to set up trailer inspections on HWY 400 at the rest stops, especially on long weekends. They check for any unsafe towing condition, usually brakes, lights, chains. If they suspect you're grossly over your limits they're going to pull you off the road.

But you don't even need a 1/2 ton, my old neighbor pulled a 5th wheel with his Dakota. No Comment.

boubou 07-04-2012 07:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dave_Monica

A little late to be asking this now!

You should have weighed the truck, ready to camp, gassed, everyone on board. Add 200 pounds for the hitch and then you'd have known what pin weight you can carry without exceeding the RAWR.

The risk may be getting weighed if overweight is suspected. I'm not sure what the consequences may be if you're found to be over the TV's RAWR...it may be parked until corrected.

Dave

According to previous weigh in, I have 1300 lbs loaded /With ppl and gear left over for hitch. Dealer (and brochure) told me hitch weight on 5w is 1149lbs. So I asked and was told ti load in the back of the rig and no weight would be added up front. I'm just nervous because I don't know for sure what the weigh in will be. All speculation until I get to the scales.
Another question is: I love coming i this forum for help and info, you are all very helpful but i wonder how many people just go out and purchase a TT or 5W and only listens/trust the salesman? I doubt that most RVers out there on the road weigh in their RV or even have a
Clue what the numbers should be.

bikendan 07-05-2012 02:11 AM

if you choose to tow something with a marginal tow vehicle, then it's very important to have things weighed.

i didn't want to deal with this, so i bought a truck/trailer combo that i wouldn't have to, because i wasn't towing with a marginal vehicle. i have over a ton of extra towing capacity and plenty of extra payload. i don't have to worry about every pound of water or cargo. i simply load what i want and go.

bottom line, unless you have a F-150 Ecoboost with the HD payload and max Tow Package, then any other 1/2 ton truck will be a marginal tow vehicle for a 5th wheel, mainly in the payload/pin weight department.
therefore, weighing will help figuring out how marginal the truck is.

when we move up to a 5th wheel, you can bet i won't be towing with a 1/2 ton because i refuse to have to worry about all the weights i'd have to consider.

KyDan 07-05-2012 07:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dunnnc (Post 218204)
I am towing a 12 Flagstaff 8528 with an 05 Silverado Ext. Cab 1500 short bed with airbags & onboard compressor. Supposedly I am grossly over weight, but have towed it over 1500 miles so far and have no problems whatsoever either pulling it or stopping it. Have added shocks to the trailer and have not experienced the chucking or dophining/porpoising. The trailer follows the contour of the road and neither exaggerates or continues the action after crossing that section of wavy road. We are very pleased with the whole rig. It may wear the truck out prematurely, but at our age, we will either rebuild it or hang it up permanently and sell what's left.

Have you weighed your trailer AND which engine do you have???
Very curious as my wife is pushing for a larger trailer and I believe a 5er is
in our future!

comfun1 07-05-2012 08:24 AM

In the late nineties myself and three of my friends all bought fifth wheels ranging from 28-30' and pulled them with our extended cab short bed half tons. There were two Chevys a Ford and a GMC and all had V8's. No one had any problems and we traveled the Colorado Rockies and The New Mexico Rockies including the 12,000 ft passes. Also a trip to Big Bend National Park.

Rsgtivr6 07-06-2012 03:07 AM

Here is where the buck stops. If you get into an accident and they do an investigation and you come up as overweight, you could be in trouble.

Here is a research paper from a legislative fellow for some of the Northeast states.

CRIMINAL PENALTIES FOR OVERWEIGHT TRUCKS

If there is another person involved in the accident, and they have a good lawyer, or know that you might be overweight, I would bet that will come to light. Like it has been said, sure you can do it, but should you?

transamz9 07-06-2012 05:04 AM

That is for commercial vehicles.

KyDan 07-06-2012 06:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by comfun1 (Post 218405)
In the late nineties myself and three of my friends all bought fifth wheels ranging from 28-30' and pulled them with our extended cab short bed half tons. There were two Chevys a Ford and a GMC and all had V8's. No one had any problems and we traveled the Colorado Rockies and The New Mexico Rockies including the 12,000 ft passes. Also a trip to Big Bend National Park.

BUT what size V8s?? They could have ranged from 283-289 all the way up
to 455 CI.
Also what did the trailers weigh?

OldCoot 07-06-2012 06:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KyDan (Post 218387)
Have you weighed your trailer AND which engine do you have???
Very curious as my wife is pushing for a larger trailer and I believe a 5er is
in our future!

We have a 5.3l with a 3.23 rear end. Yes, weighed the whole rig on the SC state scales.

KyDan 07-06-2012 06:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dunnnc (Post 218801)
We have a 5.3l with a 3.23 rear end. Yes, weighed the whole rig on the SC state scales.

What did does it weigh :confused:

Rsgtivr6 07-06-2012 07:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by transamz9 (Post 218781)
That is for commercial vehicles.

In many states, the commercial weight laws will still aply to personal vehicles. In MN they are listed under the same laws. It would be more of a problem in civil court where lawyers can use a broad range of reasons for compensation and damages due to wreckless endangerment. If you put it on the road, it is your responsibility to ensure it's safety. If you don't think a prosecuting lawyer wont use that towards his case, then I have a bridge for sale in San Francisco.

comfun1 07-06-2012 07:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KyDan (Post 218798)
BUT what size V8s?? They could have ranged from 283-289 all the way up
to 455 CI.
Also what did the trailers weigh?

I think the Chevy's and GMC's were 5.3 and my Ford was 5.4l. I know at the time they were the largest V8's. All the fifth wheels but one were in the 28-30' range with a single large slide containing sofa and dinette. There was a Sportsman, Cougar and a Cardinal. There was a smaller Sunnybrook with a smaller slide.

boubou 07-06-2012 11:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rsgtivr6

In many states, the commercial weight laws will still aply to personal vehicles. In MN they are listed under the same laws. It would be more of a problem in civil court where lawyers can use a broad range of reasons for compensation and damages due to wreckless endangerment. If you put it on the road, it is your responsibility to ensure it's safety. If you don't think a prosecuting lawyer wont use that towards his case, then I have a bridge for sale in San Francisco.

Now that's interesting but there is more to weight state laws than staying within one's truck weight ratings. For example:
"In Virginia rigs under 26,001 pounds GVWR, provided the tow vehicle’s GVWR is less then 16,001 pounds are legal (VA rules). Since production and full ton pickup have GVWR between 9 and 12 thousand pounds, the effective legal trailer GVWR limit ranges from 7 to 8.5 tons. VA seems to use the federal definition of a commercial vehicle. "

dretired 07-06-2012 11:37 AM

is it really a 1/2 ton ??
 
1 Attachment(s)
Attachment 16176 Towing with a 1/2 ton....i am not sure if a properly equipped F150 should even be in that category anymore..:confused: :thumbsup:

J_KHawthorne 07-06-2012 12:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by boubou (Post 218161)
there 's a lot of talk on forums about towing 5th wheel With half-ton trucks but it's all over the place. I'm sure I'm Not the only one looking for answers so I thought I'd Start a thread so that we could compare our experiences with such combos.
How many of us towing 5W with 1/2 Ton?
Which TT and TT?
Positive or negative experience with combo unit?
Future plans?
No need to Re-ash the talk about 3/4 and 1 ton requirement.... Looking for the other side of the coin.
Brigitte

We have now logged 9,700 TOWING miles with our rig. Trailer weighs in at 9,200-9,500 lbs on trips taken so far, with a pin weight of 1550 (Beacon Scales).

We are extremely careful about balancing loads and we always travel dry for the most part. (I did a segment or 2 with ~30 gals of water in the tank when we went into the interior of BC, Canada, but didn't need it.

The Tundra has towed this rig from sea-level through close to 10,000 feet flawlessly, and in temps from 27F to 102F without engine temp or tranny temp gauges budging even a fraction. On the long upgrades, I keep engine RPM's at 3500-3800 and forget about speed, which has never dropped below 45 MPH, even on the huge grade outside of Vail, CO.

Hope this os of some help!

OldCoot 07-06-2012 12:26 PM

Need to keep in mind that the weight ratings are the manufacturer's figures on what they consider their trucks can haul without damage to the truck and protect themselves from lawsuits. Not what the truck can actually haul. I would like to know what constitutes "safely tow". Just because a 3/4 or 1t truck has beefier suspension, etc. and weighs only a few hundred pounds more how it is "safer". Someone needs to define "Safer" or just what is "Unsafe" and what each actually entails.

camper_Lucy 07-06-2012 01:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dretired (Post 218919)
Attachment 16176 Towing with a 1/2 ton....i am not sure if a properly equipped F150 should even be in that category anymore..:confused: :thumbsup:

FYI,
the concept of 1/2, 3/4, 1 Ton does not really apply any more. Here is the new scale and it is by class. The classes apply to Personal and Commercial and this now how states regulate and control things. Hence when you see someone post a comment about and overloaded TV and TT combo, this is where they will refer to the class regulations on the states books to ticket you if you happen to be in an accident or other event where an officer would show up. But most think that since they are personal TV and not required to pull into scales that there is a difference between the two and the weights do not apply to them, they are wrong.

Light Duty
[edit]Class 1
The Class 1 truck gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) ranges from 0 to 6,000 pounds (0 to 2,722 kg).[1] Examples of trucks in this class include the Toyota Tacoma, Dodge Dakota and GMC Canyon.[4][5]
[edit]Class 2
The Class 2 truck gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) ranges from 6,001 to 10,000 pounds (2,722 to 4,536 kg).[1] Examples of vehicles in this class include the Dodge Ram 1500 and the Ford F-150. Class 2 is subdivided into Class 2a and Class 2b, with class 2a being 6,001 to 8,500 pounds (2,722 to 3,856 kg) pounds, and class 2b being 8,501 to 10,000 pounds (3,856 to 4,536 kg) pounds. Class 2a is commonly referred to as a light duty truck, with class 2b being the lowest heavy-duty class, also called the light heavy-duty class.[5][6] [7]
[edit]Class 3
The Class 3 truck gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) ranges from 10,001 to 14,000 pounds (4,536 to 6,350 kg).[8] Examples of vehicles in this class include the Dodge Ram 3500, Ford F-350 and the GMC Sierra 3500, both dual rear wheel and single rear wheel.[5] The Hummer H1 is another example of a single rear wheel Class 3 truck, with a GVWR of 10,300 lbs.
[edit]Medium Duty
[edit]Class 4
The Class 4 truck gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) ranges from 14,001 to 16,000 pounds (6,351 to 7,257 kg).[8] Examples of vehicles in this class include select Ford F-450 trucks, Dodge Ram 4500, and the GMC 4500.[5]
[edit]Class 5
The Class 5 truck gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) ranges from 16,001 to 19,500 pounds (7,258 to 8,845 kg).[8] Examples of trucks in this class include the International TerraStar, GMC 5500.[9] Dodge Ram 5500, and the Ford F-550
[edit]Class 6
The Class 6 truck gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) ranges from 19,501 to 26,000 pounds (8,846 to 11,793 kg). Examples of trucks in this class include the International Durastar, GMC Topkick C6500.[10] and the Ford F-650

camper_Lucy 07-06-2012 01:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by boubou (Post 218180)
What's the chucking caused by an how does it get fixed?
Also, I understand about pin weight on TT is fixed but how does pin weight work on 5th wheel? Can that be changed by moving cargo to the back of
The unit and how much of that pin weigh gets (little as it may be) transferred to front axle?
Picking up Jayco Eagle Superlite HT(half ton towable) 23.5 tomorrow and will report on it on this specific thread.

It's my understanding, (maybe incorrectly) that most chucking is caused by one of two things, a nose high Trailer, or to light of pin weight.
I do know that I solved my slight chucking by readjusting my load and moving weight forward in the TT. I determined I was a little pin light after going to the scale. My unit was all ready level.

Rsgtivr6 07-06-2012 02:52 PM

The thought process of "it pulls fine, therefore, it is fine" is not always correct. The engines are rarely the limiting factor these days. Even some naturally aspirated 6 cylinder engines are outdoing hp and tq numbers of yesteryear 8s. It's the components attached to that engine that limit your ability. Something as small as the bearings used will drop GVWR by hundreds. You have to take the truck as a whole into consideration.

I am not your parent and I wont lose sleep over the issue, but I don't want to read a thread later about "I blew my brakes out down the hill with my 1500 and 5er this weekend." All I am trying to point out is if you do decide to exceed manufacturers ratings and injure yourself or others, don't expect the insurance company ignore an out on payout if they find out, nor a lawyer to miss a payday. I sure know I will push the issue if I knew the TV/TT combo that wrecked me was overloaded.

The numbers are there for a reason, and even if you think it can pull more, it doesn't mean it can do so reliably nor safely. As most agree, the manufacturer does put the ratings out because that's what they determine to be the safe capacity to reliably load the truck to. Why chance your family, my family, and/or your expensive rig on a hunch that they are wrong?

dretired 07-06-2012 03:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by camper_Lucy (Post 218947)
FYI,
the concept of 1/2, 3/4, 1 Ton does not really apply any more. Here is the new scale and it is by class. The classes apply to Personal and Commercial and this now how states regulate and control things. Hence when you see someone post a comment about and overloaded TV and TT combo, this is where they will refer to the class regulations on the states books to ticket you if you happen to be in an accident or other event where an officer would show up. But most think that since they are personal TV and not required to pull into scales that there is a difference between the two and the weights do not apply to them, they are wrong.

Light Duty
[edit]Class 1
The Class 1 truck gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) ranges from 0 to 6,000 pounds (0 to 2,722 kg).[1] Examples of trucks in this class include the Toyota Tacoma, Dodge Dakota and GMC Canyon.[4][5]
[edit]Class 2
The Class 2 truck gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) ranges from 6,001 to 10,000 pounds (2,722 to 4,536 kg).[1] Examples of vehicles in this class include the Dodge Ram 1500 and the Ford F-150. Class 2 is subdivided into Class 2a and Class 2b, with class 2a being 6,001 to 8,500 pounds (2,722 to 3,856 kg) pounds, and class 2b being 8,501 to 10,000 pounds (3,856 to 4,536 kg) pounds. Class 2a is commonly referred to as a light duty truck, with class 2b being the lowest heavy-duty class, also called the light heavy-duty class.[5][6] [7]
[edit]Class 3
The Class 3 truck gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) ranges from 10,001 to 14,000 pounds (4,536 to 6,350 kg).[8] Examples of vehicles in this class include the Dodge Ram 3500, Ford F-350 and the GMC Sierra 3500, both dual rear wheel and single rear wheel.[5] The Hummer H1 is another example of a single rear wheel Class 3 truck, with a GVWR of 10,300 lbs.
[edit]Medium Duty
[edit]Class 4
The Class 4 truck gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) ranges from 14,001 to 16,000 pounds (6,351 to 7,257 kg).[8] Examples of vehicles in this class include select Ford F-450 trucks, Dodge Ram 4500, and the GMC 4500.[5]
[edit]Class 5
The Class 5 truck gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) ranges from 16,001 to 19,500 pounds (7,258 to 8,845 kg).[8] Examples of trucks in this class include the International TerraStar, GMC 5500.[9] Dodge Ram 5500, and the Ford F-550
[edit]Class 6
The Class 6 truck gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) ranges from 19,501 to 26,000 pounds (8,846 to 11,793 kg). Examples of trucks in this class include the International Durastar, GMC Topkick C6500.[10] and the Ford F-650

So.. which class would my truck be in ?? with a 9,800 lb tow rating for 5th wheel / TT ??:confused:

pwrstroke2012 07-06-2012 05:30 PM

I had an 09' F150 with the max trailer tow package that was rated to tow 11,300# according to Ford brochure. I used it to tow a 30' Rockwood TT that is 7000# UVW and used a Equalizer WDH, installed Firestone air bags and thought I would be well within limitations. After towing with it for 3 years I bought a 2012 F350 Diesel and couldn't be happier with the switch. The deciding factor came is when I had the F150 bed loaded with 2 sets of SCUBA gear along with tanks, 5 passengers, and a minimally loaded trailer. It was a white knuckle experience to say the least and when we made it home I went truck shopping. The motor was plenty strong in the 150 (5.4L) I was just expecting better handling. I feel so much more secure towing with my family having the heavier truck

OldCoot 07-06-2012 06:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pwrstroke2012 (Post 219021)
I had an 09' F150 with the max trailer tow package that was rated to tow 11,300# according to Ford brochure. I used it to tow a 30' Rockwood TT that is 7000# UVW and used a Equalizer WDH, installed Firestone air bags and thought I would be well within limitations. After towing with it for 3 years I bought a 2012 F350 Diesel and couldn't be happier with the switch. The deciding factor came is when I had the F150 bed loaded with 2 sets of SCUBA gear along with tanks, 5 passengers, and a minimally loaded trailer. It was a white knuckle experience to say the least and when we made it home I went truck shopping. The motor was plenty strong in the 150 (5.4L) I was just expecting better handling. I feel so much more secure towing with my family having the heavier truck

Big difference between a TT and a 5er. It is a much more stable trailer that is virtually unaffected by passing semi's, mh, buses, etc. The 5er is a dream to pull compared to the 7 TT we've had since 1976 that all had dual friction sway controls and the Reese WDH.

pwb01 07-06-2012 06:59 PM

F150 6 cyl, see below. The ecoboost pulls the 8000# 5th wheel with absolutely no problem. Keeps up with traffic and never slows down on hills.

with Max tow package:
Pin wt cap 2200
3:73 rear end 11,300 tow max
365hp
420 ft lbs torque
built in brake controller with sway detector/auto brake
hill hold braking system
extending mirrors with blind spot mirrors
36 gal tank and economy of a 6 cyl (11.5mpg towing Rocky)

perfect for ultra light 5th wheel (mine is 7000# empty)

pwrstroke2012 07-06-2012 07:23 PM

dunnnc, I understand the difference that the 5er tows better than the TT no doubt, but the p metric tire they put on most 1/2 tons are not made for heavy loads. I am thinking weight is weight no matter if you pull a TT, 5ver or a wooden dutch shoe. I was tired of wondering if I was overloaded or if I could stop the trailer (any trailer) if my trailer brakes went out. It boils down to what you feel comfortable with.

boubou 07-06-2012 07:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dunnnc

Big difference between a TT and a 5er. It is a much more stable trailer that is virtually unaffected by passing semi's, mh, buses, etc. The 5er is a dream to pull compared to the 7 TT we've had since 1976 that all had dual friction sway controls and the Reese WDH.

Lots of 1/2 ton (and larger trucks) also overloaded with TT's just the same. It's easy to get over the payload with a large TT. Like dunnnc says, between the two, the 5er will handle the load and be more stable on the road: safer. My warped logic.

pwrstroke2012 07-06-2012 08:03 PM

BouBou, alot of difference of what is safer and what is safe. As I said, it is what you are comfortable with.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:59 PM.