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-   -   Constancy tyres (tires) (http://www.forestriverforums.com/forums/f219/constancy-tyres-tires-77061.html)

dsjohns71 03-13-2015 05:29 PM

Constancy tyres (tires)
 
Has anyone heard of these? Are they any good or are they the crappy China bomb tires everyone is getting rid of as quickly as possible? I have googled them and there is very little to no info on them.. My tires are st225/75/15 and they are "d" load rated.. Please let me if these are crap and I need to replace soon or if they'll do for a while.. These came on my new heritage glen TT.

Thanks,
Doug

Blackhat6mike 03-13-2015 05:32 PM

Sorry, never heard of them. Tire companies come and go each time one gets a bad name or are bought out by some other Co.

Flybob 03-13-2015 05:40 PM

My TT came equipped with these. I plan to run them about a year and a half then replace them. I run TMPS sensors and check them at every stop. FR must work very hard to find these manufacturers.

dsjohns71 03-13-2015 08:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Flybob (Post 805295)
My TT came equipped with these. I plan to run them about a year and a half then replace them. I run TMPS sensors and check them at every stop. FR must work very hard to find these manufacturers.


That's kinda what I was thinking.. Just hope they hold up till then. And you're right FR must work very hard to find the cheapest tires they can.

Coachmanjk 03-14-2015 02:48 PM

My new Coachmen just came with these. I was going to have them balanced and run them for this season and then switch them out.

DreiHunde 03-14-2015 02:57 PM

They are on my camper and no issues (took delivery in May last year). Also have a set on an enclosed trailer that gets quire of bit of local travel that are 3 years old.

geotex1 03-14-2015 03:15 PM

They are as Chinese of a tire as can be. They are just another of the several dozen brands Weifang Yuelong Rubber/Shandong Yuelong Tyre/Qingdao Rubber (all same company) in Shandong pumps out in their LY188 design. If I recall correctly, if you order 3,000 pieces in the same size they'll slap any name you want on them! The same LY188s are regularly seen as Triangle, DoubleStar, DoubleKing, and Shineroad brands.

vinmaker 03-14-2015 04:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by geotex1 (Post 806066)
They are as Chinese of a tire as can be. They are just another of the several dozen brands Weifang Yuelong Rubber/Shandong Yuelong Tyre/Qingdao Rubber (all same company) in Shandong pumps out in their LY188 design. If I recall correctly, if you order 3,000 pieces in the same size they'll slap any name you want on them! The same LY188s are regularly seen as Triangle, DoubleStar, DoubleKing, and Shineroad brands.

I am sure that FR buys a lot more than 3,000. Sure makes it hard to figure anything out about them. But I am sure that is the whole freaking point.

DiverDennis 05-21-2015 08:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dsjohns71 (Post 805281)
Has anyone heard of these? Are they any good or are they the crappy China bomb tires everyone is getting rid of as quickly as possible? I have googled them and there is very little to no info on them.. My tires are st225/75/15 and they are "d" load rated.. Please let me if these are crap and I need to replace soon or if they'll do for a while.. These came on my new heritage glen TT.

Thanks,
Doug

I have the same ones that you do. Gonna keep an eye on 'em. :cool:

Gyrogearloose 09-06-2015 09:46 PM

Just got back from our first long road trip in Colorado. After going over Monarch Pass, we pulled into a gas station in Buena Vista and a woman pointed out that a tire on our trailer had shredded. I hadn't felt it. The tire was a Constancy LY188 with less than 1000 miles on it. I checked pressure before we started out this morning and it was very close to 50lbs. There were no obvious events that should have caused this.

asquared 09-06-2015 10:17 PM

Constancy is made by lionshead tires who also makes the more commonly seen Westlake tires.

ependydad 09-06-2015 10:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by asquared (Post 976269)
Constancy is made by lionshead tires who also makes the more commonly seen Westlake tires.


Slight clarification that lionshead doesn't make tires; they're just a distributor. I know when I had my Akurets, I found the actual maker and they referred me to lionshead for warranty stuff.

dsjohns71 09-07-2015 08:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gyrogearloose (Post 976251)
Just got back from our first long road trip in Colorado. After going over Monarch Pass, we pulled into a gas station in Buena Vista and a woman pointed out that a tire on our trailer had shredded. I hadn't felt it. The tire was a Constancy LY188 with less than 1000 miles on it. I checked pressure before we started out this morning and it was very close to 50lbs. There were no obvious events that should have caused this.


What size tires do you have? I could swear I keep my aired up at 65lbs, that might have been your issue with the tire shredding up? Not trying to stick up for the POS tires, just some people have never had issues with them, some do. Just like everything else I suppose. So far mine have held up and still look new. I'll probably put new tires on in the spring.

Gyrogearloose 09-07-2015 09:02 AM

Tire problem
 
Good question on the appropriate pressure.

My Rockwood 2604WS came from the factory with Constancy Ly188 ST205/75R14 tires. These are rated at 50lbs.

Looking at the sidewall, the load rating is 1570lbs in a dual axle application.
Times 4 equals 6280 lbs total load capacity.

The door sticker says dry trailer weight is 5995 lbs, and cargo capacity is 1660 lbs. So, total trailer weight GVWR would be 7655lbs fully loaded.

If my tongue weight is 1000lbs, this still puts 6655lbs of load on tires that are rated for 6280 lbs.

I think I have two problems. One is a bad tire since the trailer wasn't anywhere near loaded to the max, and the second is that the factory put on undersized tires for the rated GVWR.

Gyrogearloose 09-07-2015 09:12 AM

...and my obvious concern about having one brand new tire fail is whether I can trust the others with the safety of my family.

ependydad 09-07-2015 11:35 AM

Constancy tyres (tires)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Gyrogearloose (Post 976485)
Looking at the sidewall, the load rating is 1570lbs in a dual axle application.


In this instance a "dual" application means 2 tires side by side on one end of a single axle- like dually trucks have. Not 2 axles each having a single tire on each end (which is called tandem axles).

That said, the tires are still likely close to maximum capacity. I know my tires didn't have enough capacity to fully support the axles. Never caused issues, but I did do upgrades to make me more comfortable.

Also- not sure where you are, but various places around the country have outfits who will do individual wheel weights. It can be very enlightening.

Gyrogearloose 09-07-2015 11:47 AM

I had also wondered about the side by side vs two axle interpretation of the word 'dual'.


Goodyear makes the following statement about single vs dual rating for trailer tires:
"For dual-axle trailers, loads must be reduced by 12%”.
The single rating for my tires is 1760lbs, the dual rating is 1570lbs.
If I take 12% off of 1760lbs, I get 1550lbs which is pretty close to the 1570lbs dual rating on the tire.


Of course, since very little technical information is available on line for the Constancy tires, it's hard to know whether they agree with Goodyear..... But the ratings on similarly sized class C tires are identical independent of vendor, so one would think that the same derating for dual axles would apply.


dsjohns71 09-07-2015 12:14 PM

My constancy tires are D rated and thus are to be aired up to 65 psi. I have heard nothing good about these tires especially the C rated version. When my time comes to change I'm going either to the maxxus 8008 or the GY Marathons..

Gyrogearloose 09-07-2015 12:46 PM

Yeah. Because mine are C rated, they only take 50psi. I'm seriously considering replacing my new tires on my new trailer with a name brand. One tire failure is one too many. Problem is that D rated tires in my size are not very common. I might need to go with a wider or bigger tire, which is a new bag of worms.


I'm confused about the single vs dual load rating. I've confirmed that ependydad is correct that 'dual' seems to apply to side-by-side applications. But Goodyear also seems to require load derating by 12% for dual axle applications. So it also may apply to dual axles.


I've sent Goodyear an email asking for clarification/validation of the 12% derating guideline for dual axles.

asquared 09-07-2015 12:57 PM

Part of the weight shortcomings is they figure some of the weight is tongue weight/pin weight. That said, there has been a lot of encouragement lately to get people to report their trailer tire failures to the nhtsa. This way, they can be recorded and followed so maybe eventually done change in this policy is effected.

Airdale 09-07-2015 01:33 PM

In the tire industry world, dual tire fitments are those tires that are configured side by side on a single axle such as found on the rear axle of a dually truck or on trailers used in the trucking industry. One of the reasons for lower inflation pressures in that configuration is to off-set road crown. Most tire manufacturers will figure the off-set pressures at 12-15% and those pressures will be displayed on all tires that can be used in any dual configurations.

ependydad 09-07-2015 02:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Airdale (Post 976754)
In the tire industry world, dual tire fitments are those tires that are configured side by side on a single axle such as found on the rear axle of a dually truck or on trailers used in the trucking industry. One of the reasons for lower inflation pressures in that configuration is to off-set road crown. Most tire manufacturers will figure the off-set pressures at 12-15% and those pressures will be displayed on all tires that can be used in any dual configurations.

I always wondered why my duals were a lower pressure than my front tires when they're all the same. Thanks for the tidbit of info!

I saw a contraption on a tractor trailer's duals that equalized the pressure between the tires. The marketing/manufacturer said it was due to the road crown to equalize wear on the tires. It was this:
http://www.amazon.com/Crossfire-Dual.../dp/B0003040ZS

Gyrogearloose 09-07-2015 03:08 PM

Yeah. If I figure 1000 lbs for tongue weight, I'm still in trouble if the 'dual' rating applies to both side by side and tandem applications as Goodyear seems to be saying.


Any idea where a complaint to NHTSA can be filed?

ependydad 09-07-2015 03:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gyrogearloose (Post 976840)
Any idea where a complaint to NHTSA can be filed?

https://www-odi.nhtsa.dot.gov/ivoq/

Tireman9 09-07-2015 08:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Airdale (Post 976754)
In the tire industry world, dual tire fitments are those tires that are configured side by side on a single axle such as found on the rear axle of a dually truck or on trailers used in the trucking industry. One of the reasons for lower inflation pressures in that configuration is to off-set road crown. Most tire manufacturers will figure the off-set pressures at 12-15% and those pressures will be displayed on all tires that can be used in any dual configurations.


I suggest you re-read the tire sidewall. I know of no pressure decrease when in dual application. There is a load capacity reduction but no pressure reduction.

Tireman9 09-07-2015 08:16 PM

I have heard it suggested that if you can't find a dealership for a brand of tires then you may just have "Container Babies". which have as a primary objective low cost and are imported in container quantities and sold to highest bidder.
If you can't find a dealer how are you going to get any warranty adjustment? Who would you see if there were a tire recall?

Airdale 09-07-2015 11:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Airdale (Post 976754)
In the tire industry world, dual tire fitments are those tires that are configured side by side on a single axle such as found on the rear axle of a dually truck or on trailers used in the trucking industry. One of the reasons for lower load capacities in that configuration is to off-set road crown. Most tire manufacturers will figure the off-set load capacities at 12-15% and those load capacities will be displayed on all tires that can be used in any dual configurations.

Sorry about the wording in this post. I've changed it with green print.

Gyrogearloose 09-08-2015 03:30 PM

Here's an interesting quote from Carlisle Tire. It comes from a 'Tips and Best Practices' document.


"The combined capacity of all the tires should exceed the loaded trailer weight by 20 percent".

http://www.carlisletransportationpro..._Practices.pdf


If I go by this rule with my Rockwood trailer, I would need a load rating of 2300lbs per tire.
The tires that came with it have a 1760lbs single load rating.

mud yapster 09-08-2015 04:09 PM

I have China Westlake tires on my 5er GVWR is 18,000 lbs. My 6 tires are rated at 3520 each = 21,120 lbs. If I take off tounge weight of 15% minimum or 2700# that leaves me with 15,300# on my tires at full load. I don't tow with a full load but close at usually 17,000# so by the before posted 20% I'm all good with RV to tire weight which is starting to relieve my stress about my Westlake tires. I checked the date on the tires and they were made in march 2013 even though my 5er is 1 years old so I'm pushing the 3 yr. old tire marker. I'm Thinking I better use my tax money this year for tires. I hate all the tire issues I hear from these China bombs it scars me about the damage from a blow out causes, but I'm well under the ratings of my tires. Should I worry???

Gyrogearloose 09-08-2015 06:46 PM

Based on the shopping I've been doing, it may be impossible to avoid Chinese made tires. So I've decided to buy a Tire Pressure Monitoring System that displays both tire pressure and temperature. This ought to give me some warning that a tire is failing before it blows out. Because I already blew a tire and Forest River left me with little or no load margin, I'm also going to replace my almost new C rated tires with D rated ones. If you already have decent load margin, this shouldn't be as urgent.

Gyrogearloose 09-09-2015 08:48 AM

I talked to Rockwood yesterday about my blowout. They're offering to replace or reimburse for one failed tire. I've found multiple recommendations on the web that suggest both tires on one side should always be replaced when one fails catastrophically. The reason is that the remaining tire has probably been overstressed by carrying the full load on its side. In my case I drove without knowing I had only one tire intact until I stopped for fuel. I'm not accepting their offer, but will press them harder.

I was told by Rockwood that tires sometimes fail; my response was that at age 65 I've got 48 years of driving experience and have never had a tire fail without obvious cause until now. This is BS.


I was also told by Rockwood that a reason not to put more capable tires on the trailers is so customers won't read the tire load rating and think they can overload the trailer. This is also BS. The GVWR of the trailer applies as a maximum no matter what changes one makes.


My opinion is that in trying to save a few bucks on tires, Rockwood is ignoring an issue that will sooner or later cause a fatal accident. ...and they're also going to lose customers as this issue becomes even more apparent.

Gyrogearloose 09-09-2015 08:53 AM

....for anyone who has also been looking for D rated 14 inch replacements, I've found these:
Kenda Karrier ST205/75R14 2040lbs/65psi
Taskmaster ST215/75R14 2200lbs/65psi (only from etrailer.com)
Kumho 857 205R14C 2271lbs/65psi/99mph


The Kumho's are a commercial use tire and will cost me $200 more than the cheap stuff on the market, but one blowout prevented is easily worth that much to me.

Gyrogearloose 09-09-2015 09:49 AM

I talked this morning with an engineer at Dexter, the manufacturer of my Torflex axles. He seemed to validate the need to de-rate tire load rating as recommended by Carlisle (my earlier post). He points out that trailers are not usually balanced left to right due to the weight of slide-outs on one side. So one side will inevitably carry more weight than the other. He also agreed with me that a pair of tandem axles won't share weight exactly equally because of production variations in the spring constants...one axle will always be a little stiffer than the other.

So, the conclusion is that you can't take your total trailer weight, subtract the tongue weight, and then divide by four to figure the load on each tire. You need to add in a margin (20% as recommended by Carlisle) because there will always be variations in load among four tires on two axles.

The Dexter engineer also warned that the axle is designed for a specific diameter tire. Going to a larger tire in order to increase load capacity may overstress the axle.

dannyabear 09-09-2015 10:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gyrogearloose (Post 978581)
....for anyone who has also been looking for D rated 14 inch replacements, I've found these:
Kenda Karrier ST205/75R14 2040lbs/65psi
Taskmaster ST215/75R14 2200lbs/65psi (only from etrailer.com)
Kumho 857 205R14C 2271lbs/65psi/99mph


The Kumho's are a commercial use tire and will cost me $200 more than the cheap stuff on the market, but one blowout prevented is easily worth that much to me.

Kendra and Taskmaster are chinese; the Kumho 857 or Hankook RA08 are made elsewhere and true 8 ply load D and more capacity; I paid $500 for 4 of the Hankooks (shipped) from busdepot.com

Gyrogearloose 09-09-2015 10:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dannyabear (Post 978640)
Kendra and Taskmaster are chinese; the Kumho 857 or Hankook RA08 are made elsewhere and true 8 ply load D and more capacity; I paid $500 for 4 of the Hankooks (shipped) from busdepot.com

What size Hancooks did you get?
I only see 185R14 and 195R14 on their website.....

dannyabear 09-09-2015 10:38 AM

The 195 is the same physical size as the st205; because it is a true truck tire it is 82 aspect instead of 75; but they work wonderful. You can look up all the specs at hankooktire.com

ependydad 09-09-2015 11:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gyrogearloose (Post 978622)
So, the conclusion is that you can't take your total trailer weight, subtract the tongue weight, and then divide by four to figure the load on each tire. You need to add in a margin (20% as recommended by Carlisle) because there will always be variations in load among four tires on two axles.

There are quite a few outfits who will do individual wheel weights for you. I did and found quite a disparity among my 4 tires.

Gyrogearloose 09-09-2015 12:57 PM

Based on info from the Tirerack.com site, the Kuhmo 205R14C is made in either China or Viet Nam.


Based on the Hankook website, they're made in either China, Hungary, or Korea.


Grumble.....

ependydad 09-09-2015 01:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gyrogearloose (Post 978816)
Based on info from the Tirerack.com site, the Kuhmo 205R14C is made in either China or Viet Nam.


Based on the Hankook website, they're made in either China, Hungary, or Korea.


Grumble.....

Are you looking for a ST tire that isn't made in China? Generally speaking, all ST tires are made in China or the far-east.

You have to go to a different type of tire if you want American made.

WEMig 09-09-2015 01:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gyrogearloose (Post 978106)
Based on the shopping I've been doing, it may be impossible to avoid Chinese made tires. So I've decided to buy a Tire Pressure Monitoring System that displays both tire pressure and temperature. This ought to give me some warning that a tire is failing before it blows out. Because I already blew a tire and Forest River left me with little or no load margin, I'm also going to replace my almost new C rated tires with D rated ones. If you already have decent load margin, this shouldn't be as urgent.

I've had one flat, one blowout, and one tire I caught visually that the tread was separating. The flat was due to a road hazzard and did no damage. TPMS would have aided in this event. The blowout was tread separation. I don't see how TPMS would have caught this before it blew. This also applies to the tire I noticed visibly during a stop. Unless there is a spike in temperature during tread separation, then not sure that TPMS is beneficial in that situation. In most cases, Chinese tires separate at the tread and then blow and cause damage. In my case, I believe that speed, road heat, and horrible road conditions were the cause. BTW, these all happened on Louisiana roads.


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