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Old 01-31-2024, 09:06 AM   #61
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I think it might have some effect, like the wdh but i guess the only way to know would be a scale.
https://fifthwheelst.com/TCLC_calculator.html
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Old 01-31-2024, 09:13 AM   #62
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So when going over bumps the suspension never compresses more than 1-1/4”?
Never said that.
Sure, fly off a bridge abutment or hit a pothole at 60 MPH and you will but under normal driving conditions, the ride is not compromised.

And remember, I'm referring to my F-250 with the heaviest suspension on it you can get, not some squishy coil spring truck that maybe has 5+ inches of suspension travel unloaded.
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Old 01-31-2024, 09:28 AM   #63
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Never said that.
Sure, fly off a bridge abutment or hit a pothole at 60 MPH and you will but under normal driving conditions, the ride is not compromised.

And remember, I'm referring to my F-250 with the heaviest suspension on it you can get, not some squishy coil spring truck that maybe has 5+ inches of suspension travel unloaded.
Never said that but indicated that, plus the OP doesn’t have your truck. I have been over roads that have rolling high/low areas that will move suspension systems up and down more than that. I also have a heavy suspension truck. While they may not affect the ride noticeably they do somewhat. Plus if your overload springs hit the same time (as stated) it is even more likely to affect the ride. It’s just that further forward where you sit is acceptable to you.
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Old 01-31-2024, 11:04 AM   #64
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I see your point So back to the discussion do u need 10 plies? I think if the tires are rated for the total load it should be OK.
Don't need "10 ply" truck tires. And way back in post #14:
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The factory fitted tires are more than capable of handling the weight. Increased tire pressure will stiffen the side walls which may help in that respect.

Weight example: My factory fitted tires at 35psi will support my truck's GVWR of 7,500 pounds (fully loaded weight rating). Same 4 tires at 50psi (max sidewall tire pressure) will support 11,024 pounds (2556 x 4). I'm not seeing a need for more tire to handle 7,500 pounds.
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Old 01-31-2024, 11:38 AM   #65
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Don't need "10 ply" truck tires. And way back in post #14:-- Chuck
Increased pressure will not stiffen the sidewall. Only the tire construction will do that. Now that the OP has posted a picture of the camper he is referring to we can see his camper is low profile. Maybe he could be satisfied with what he has.
Having owned several truck campers I have found that there isn’t a substitute for heavier ply rated tires. My campers are higher profile.
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Old 01-31-2024, 12:32 PM   #66
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Tire pressure and sidewall flex/stiffness are directly related. We can quibble about tire pressure stiffening the sidewalls but the bottom line is less flex.

Overkill always works but isn't needed in this case with this trailer. If we were discussing Hot Shot trucking it might be different but this is recreational, occasional towing and a SUV.

-- Chuck
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Old 01-31-2024, 01:12 PM   #67
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Tire pressure and sidewall flex/stiffness are directly related. We can quibble about tire pressure stiffening the sidewalls but the bottom line is less flex.

Overkill always works but isn't needed in this case with this trailer. If we were discussing Hot Shot trucking it might be different but this is recreational, occasional towing and a SUV.

-- Chuck
What trailer are you writing about? You didn’t quote anyone or any post, and the sub forum is about truck campers, not a trailer.
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Old 01-31-2024, 01:22 PM   #68
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Originally Posted by Chuck_S View Post
Tire pressure and sidewall flex/stiffness are directly related. We can quibble about tire pressure stiffening the sidewalls but the bottom line is less flex.

Overkill always works but isn't needed in this case with this trailer. If we were discussing Hot Shot trucking it might be different but this is recreational, occasional towing and a SUV.

-- Chuck
Not a trailer.You never know if the flex reduction will work until it’s tried with the situation at hand. I also have a 1500 truck mostly empty or lightly loaded with the maximum pressure I still got too much flex on the mountain roads where I live. I had to go to a tire that had heavier construction and a higher pressure rating to reduce the side flex. Also had to switch brands to do it on one vehicle because not all sizes and ratings are available from all manufacturers. Not as high as 10 ply rating necessarily.
Height of the load, the bank of the turns and wind surface area all factor in.
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Old 01-31-2024, 02:47 PM   #69
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Makes no difference what specific truck or SUV or car or trailer we're talking about.

The OEM tires will support the GVWR of the (lets just call it a) vehicle at the pressure listed on the placard normally in the vehicle drivers door jam. That all the tire or pressure anyone needs.

The example I used is what my Expedition's tires are capable of: over 3,000 pounds more than the maximum allowable weight of the vehicle. I don't need "10 ply" tires nor does the OP as long as he (and I) stay below GVWR

Heck, even my little Honda S2000 with a GVWR of 3385 lbs has tires which can support twice that weight (6612) at 50psi.

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Old 01-31-2024, 02:54 PM   #70
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Makes no difference what specific truck or SUV or car or trailer we're talking about.

The OEM tires will support the GVWR of the (lets just call it a) vehicle at the pressure listed on the placard normally in the vehicle drivers door jam. That all the tire or pressure anyone needs.

The example I used is what my Expedition's tires are capable of: over 3,000 pounds more than the maximum allowable weight of the vehicle. I don't need "10 ply" tires nor does the OP as long as he (and I) stay below GVWR

Heck, even my little Honda S2000 with a GVWR of 3385 lbs has tires which can support twice that weight (6612) at 50psi.

-- Chuck
Yes for weight, no for side effect. Once again. Those placard ratings are for ride not sway or tire wear.
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Old 01-31-2024, 07:48 PM   #71
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looking up your truck assuming its 4wd with the big cab, it shows 275/60-20. OEM tires show a weight capacity of 2,679 lbs @ 51 psi tire pressure. that is 5358 lbs total on the rear axle allowed by tires. Some of that camper weight will show in the front axle also. I would put 51psi in the tires and drive it over a truck (Cat) scall on the way home. that rear weight measurement will show if your over tire capacity. That 1200 lbs shipping weight is before you do thing like add AC, battery, water, Propane, etc. so your easily going to hit 2000 lbs or more. And I bet the rear of your truck comes in somewhere around 3200 empty (just a guess).

Check out this truck camper mag, lots of great info and I have found there weights to be dead on with the several truck campers I have owed over the years.

I did not look very long to find the 22-1600 in truck camper mag site, but I did see something close. I think ship weight is the same as dry weight.

*Palomino B-780H: dry weight, 1,309 pounds + 8 gallons fresh, 66.72 pounds + 20 pound full propane tank, 20 pounds + battery, 65 pounds + stuff, 500 pounds = 1,960.7 pounds

but they are giving you "stuff, 500 lbs" (your brackets to tie the camper on and the other Torque Lift stuff .

after you had it a while you might think about a rear sway bar. (can't remember of my 2022 2wd F150 has one or not.


Enjoy it, but I bet a dully and Host, northstar, Arctic Fox or something with one (or 4) slides will be in your future. and don't skimp on the steps/platform to get into the back from the ground. its a long way up there.
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Old 01-31-2024, 08:23 PM   #72
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looking up your truck assuming its 4wd with the big cab, it shows 275/60-20. OEM tires show a weight capacity of 2,679 lbs @ 51 psi tire pressure. that is 5358 lbs total on the rear axle allowed by tires. Some of that camper weight will show in the front axle also. I would put 51psi in the tires and drive it over a truck (Cat) scall on the way home. that rear weight measurement will show if your over tire capacity. That 1200 lbs shipping weight is before you do thing like add AC, battery, water, Propane, etc. so your easily going to hit 2000 lbs or more. And I bet the rear of your truck comes in somewhere around 3200 empty (just a guess).

Check out this truck camper mag, lots of great info and I have found there weights to be dead on with the several truck campers I have owed over the years.

I did not look very long to find the 22-1600 in truck camper mag site, but I did see something close. I think ship weight is the same as dry weight.

*Palomino B-780H: dry weight, 1,309 pounds + 8 gallons fresh, 66.72 pounds + 20 pound full propane tank, 20 pounds + battery, 65 pounds + stuff, 500 pounds = 1,960.7 pounds

but they are giving you "stuff, 500 lbs" (your brackets to tie the camper on and the other Torque Lift stuff .

after you had it a while you might think about a rear sway bar. (can't remember of my 2022 2wd F150 has one or not.


Enjoy it, but I bet a dully and Host, northstar, Arctic Fox or something with one (or 4) slides will be in your future. and don't skimp on the steps/platform to get into the back from the ground. its a long way up there.
Note he has a Real-Lite camper similar to post 53.
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Old 05-07-2024, 05:35 PM   #73
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I have a Palomino HS1806. Pretty much at max weight when completely loaded. I put Timbrens on the rear axle to keep the squat to a min. I ran my 4ply tires for a 2000km road trip, fully expecting to have tire issues. No problems but it has been roughly 25, 000 kms now. The tire tread is finally at replacement depth before winter hits. I have noticed that when carrying a load now I have an uncomfortable sway around bends. I believe my sidewalls are pooched. I will definitely be replacing with 10 ply. Read your tire specs. The 4 ply are not rated to the same max payload as your truck. They are meant for passengers not payload. I hope this helps, sorry I'm so long winded.😀
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Old 05-08-2024, 08:49 AM   #74
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Yes for weight, no for side effect. Once again. Those placard ratings are for ride not sway or tire wear.
The placard readings meas just what they say. Tires at those pressures can support the Gross Vehicle Weight Rating. Increased tire pressure above that doesn't increase the GVWR but may take some sidewall flex out and reduce some wiggle. These tires are massively over built for the weight they need to handle and can run lower "comfort" pressures.

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I put Timbrens on the rear axle to keep the squat to a min.
By reducing squat these spacers will disguise the weight imbalance result in reduced weight on the front (steering) axle. In a towing scenario they're cosmetic -- heck, I don't need no WDH! In a hauling scenario they disguise an overloaded rear axle in the name of level towing.

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Old 05-08-2024, 12:06 PM   #75
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Let’s put it back to the basics and make it easy…
Personal experience and preference. I tow a 43’ 5th wheel with a Ram 3500 dually. When hooked, there was more tire drift than I like. I swapped truck and trailer out to 19.5, 18 ply tires. Way overkill.. however, set up handles like a dream. I drop air pressure in truck when I am home, not hauling. Any rate, the stock “marshmallow” tires are garbage on most trailers and I would never run anything but a LT tire to tow any load. We have all seen that guy hauling gravel or just heavy load on a trailer. Look at the squished tires as he is fling down the road, it’s just plain irresponsible. Bottom line… ya can’t go wrong with a little overkill… it drops the risk level as you never want to have to test a system that “qualifies” by its rating in an unexpected hard turn, stop, pothole, hard bounce or hazard avoidance etc. in addition, buy new tires for that trailer every 4 years if it sits in storage not on jack stands. (This sucks but) Tires may look new and have a good date stamp, but can be de-laminating inside from not moving. If tires feel hot after 50 miles or so…. They will melt out and blow.
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