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Old 04-15-2020, 07:36 PM   #1
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Check engine light came on--Help please

2005 FR 283 motor home with Ford 6.8 L V-10 and only 50K miles

Someone loaned me a code reader. Is this easy to hook up & read?

Someone else said to check gas cap for tightness. Said loose cap can trigger check engine light to come on

Ideas & suggestions please. I'm trying not to take to a shop if possible.

Thanks everyone--Jerry
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Old 04-15-2020, 07:42 PM   #2
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Plug in and read the code you can find what the code means on the internet it is easy to use. Normally plug in turn the key to on (don't start the engine) and wait until the reader is done downloading the codes. Just plug into the OSB port under the dash
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Old 04-15-2020, 07:44 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lexington 283 View Post
2005 FR 283 motor home with Ford 6.8 L V-10 and only 50K miles

Someone loaned me a code reader. Is this easy to hook up & read?

Someone else said to check gas cap for tightness. Said loose cap can trigger check engine light to come on

Ideas & suggestions please. I'm trying not to take to a shop if possible.

Thanks everyone--Jerry

If uncomfortable using the machine my experience is that many Auto Stores, NAPA, Car Quest, Auto Zone etc will read the codes for free. The shop I use never charges to read a trouble code. That is my experience.
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Old 04-15-2020, 07:47 PM   #4
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First thing you need to do is locate the ODB port and plug in the reader. This is usually found under the dashboard. Turn the ignition key to the ON position and push read on the reader. The reader should then display any fault codes. You can lookup the meaning of these codes online. Personally I NEVER believe a code the first time it appears. I will usually clear the codes out and see if it returns before worrying about repairs.


Last summer I was on a road trip with my disabled wife when my computer registered a fault code from the turbo charger. The engine power was greatly reduced to the point where I couldn't get the truck over 30mph even with the gas floored. I knew that if the turbo was indeed bad, it would've taken many days and many thousands of dollars to fix. I cleared the code and resumed driving keeping a close eye on it waiting for it to return, it never did.
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Old 04-16-2020, 01:38 PM   #5
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I had a similar problem with "check engine" light on for miles and then off with no change in performance in my 2011 Sunseeker with a Ford chassis.. Had it evaluated and reset several times but on-off continued. Resolution occurred when a good mechanic found a loose connection on the sensor. No problem since!
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Old 04-16-2020, 01:39 PM   #6
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OBD II

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Originally Posted by SeaDog View Post
Plug in and read the code you can find what the code means on the internet it is easy to use. Normally plug in turn the key to on (don't start the engine) and wait until the reader is done downloading the codes. Just plug into the OSB port under the dash
Umm, that would be the OBD II port. It stands for OnBoard Diagnostics, version II. The port is always under the dash on the driver's side.
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Originally Posted by timfromma View Post
First thing you need to do is locate the ODB port and plug in the reader. This is usually found under the dashboard. Turn the ignition key to the ON position and push read on the reader. The reader should then display any fault codes. You can lookup the meaning of these codes online. Personally I NEVER believe a code the first time it appears. I will usually clear the codes out and see if it returns before worrying about repairs.
It's not ODB, either.
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Old 04-16-2020, 01:40 PM   #7
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Check Engine Light

The first time I saw this light come on in my Lincoln over 15 years ago, I went into a mild panic thinking the engine had experienced a major (and expensive) problem and pulled off the road. I got out the Owners Manual and didn't see anything; so, I called Lincoln. They just laughed and said it was nothing to panic over. They said it could be a loose gas cap (as mentioned by others) or one of the oxygen sensors in the emissions system. It turned out to be one of the sensors so I took it to my local mechanic and had it replace. The cost was not exorbitant.
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Old 04-16-2020, 01:44 PM   #8
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We have a Blue Tooth reader. I leave it plugged in when we are on a trip. DW has it linked to her Cell Phone. If the check engine light comes on, she can tell me what it is, driving down the highway. Think it was around $100. Gives us some piece of mind. We get an EVAP system error every now and then. Usually it's the gas cap but not in our case. I'm not worried about it. I think it has something to do with the way FR hooks the gas feed up to the Generator.
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Old 04-16-2020, 01:45 PM   #9
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Umm, that would be the OBD II port. It stands for OnBoard Diagnostics, version II. The port is always under the dash on the driver's side.

It's not ODB, either.
I've been working on my shop installing some OSB and had an analcrantal inversion when I typed that. LOL
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Old 04-16-2020, 01:52 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by Lexington 283 View Post
2005 FR 283 motor home with Ford 6.8 L V-10 and only 50K miles

Someone loaned me a code reader. Is this easy to hook up & read?

Someone else said to check gas cap for tightness. Said loose cap can trigger check engine light to come on

Ideas & suggestions please. I'm trying not to take to a shop if possible.

Thanks everyone--Jerry
The loose gas cap is a very frequent culprit. It will clear itself. Problem is, it will take multiple engine starts to clear.

There is a product called Fixd with several similar/same readers under different names. It has an app that can be downloaded to a smart phone where the codes are deciphered. I have seen them for less than $50.

https://www.bestbuy.com/site/fixd-ve...E&gclsrc=aw.ds

We have a Verizon HUM device that will notify via email if and engine code is noted. It also has a phone # assigned to it in case of a crash or need for road service. This has notified us of a specific problem, but there was no dash warnings. All have been false alarms. Strange, though, our engine light came on and was on for over a week because of a loose gas cap. Hum didn't recognize it. Eventually the engine light cancelled itself.The good thing about HUM is that it can be transferred veh to veh and we get notice via email noting the change and to what vehicle. The bad is that it reports the maximum speed during the period even if it is for a few seconds.
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Old 04-16-2020, 02:06 PM   #11
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The Check Engine Light

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Originally Posted by LannyCox View Post
The first time I saw this light come on in my Lincoln over 15 years ago, I went into a mild panic thinking the engine had experienced a major (and expensive) problem and pulled off the road. I got out the Owners Manual and didn't see anything; so, I called Lincoln. They just laughed and said it was nothing to panic over. They said it could be a loose gas cap (as mentioned by others) or one of the oxygen sensors in the emissions system. It turned out to be one of the sensors so I took it to my local mechanic and had it replace. The cost was not exorbitant.
The Check Engine Light (Its proper name is the Malfunction Indicator Lamp or MIL) actually has multiple states. Understanding them will give you much peace of mind.
  • Off: Best state of all
  • Solid Yellow: Something's up but you can defer service for a while. Just keep going. Nothing will break.
  • Solid Red: Get service right away. It's okay to drive directly to the service place.
  • Flashing Red: Shut the engine off this instant. Call for a tow. Allowing the engine to run will cause expensive damage.
Some vehicles have just three states: Off, solid yellow (ok to drive), flashing yellow (stop now!).
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Old 04-16-2020, 02:27 PM   #12
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Sorry but I am one of those people the if it runs fine I ignore the light. It is usually the loose gas cap or an emission item.

The last time the light came on my Mustang last summer, I found it last week. 10K miles later, It was a loose vacuum line to an O2 sensor. Reset the light and been off since.

Time before that it was on our Suckeroo it was on the whole time I owned it.


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Old 04-16-2020, 02:29 PM   #13
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We had the check engine light go on and brought it into a Ford dealership 3 times. Each of the first 2 times they "thought" they fixed the problem that was causing it. Finally on the 3rd trip they found a vent on the gas tank was cracked, they had to remove the gas tank to fix the problem and the light has not come back on in several years now.
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Old 04-16-2020, 02:35 PM   #14
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Sorry but I am one of those people the if it runs fine I ignore the light. It is usually the loose gas cap or an emission item.
Unless it's not. Can come on for many reasons including failed O2 sensor or misfires due to a cracked spark plug. Depending on the fault, the engine could be put in an open loop mode which would consume more fuel since it richens up the mixture. Not sure why you think it would be a good idea to just ignore it in a case like this.
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Old 04-16-2020, 02:43 PM   #15
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I have a "Scan Gauge" connected to the obd II port all the time. It gives me real time numbers for just about anything the computer is reading. Only four at a time though. But I can also use it to scan codes by just pushing a button. Comes with Velcro so you can mount it to the steering column or any place else for easy reading while you drive.
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Old 04-16-2020, 02:51 PM   #16
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Unless it's not. Can come on for many reasons including failed O2 sensor or misfires due to a cracked spark plug. Depending on the fault, the engine could be put in an open loop mode which would consume more fuel since it richens up the mixture. Not sure why you think it would be a good idea to just ignore it in a case like this.
99.99% percent of the time it is minor. And yes I do not go in a panic mode if it comes on. As I mentioned I do check it. Then most of the time it gets fixed later. (Usually years later)


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Old 04-16-2020, 02:59 PM   #17
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99.99% percent of the time it is minor. And yes I do not go in a panic mode if it comes on. As I mentioned I do check it. Then most of the time it gets fixed later. (Usually years later)


LOL...not all the ones I have seen. I used to be a design engineer for GM and worked at the proving grounds in AZ. All the one we would see were not minor. In my personal cars, I have seen the O2 sensor, O2 heating element, misfire due to cracked spark plug ceramic, failed shift relay...
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Old 04-16-2020, 03:22 PM   #18
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LOL...not all the ones I have seen. I used to be a design engineer for GM and worked at the proving grounds in AZ. All the one we would see were not minor. In my personal cars, I have seen the O2 sensor, O2 heating element, misfire due to cracked spark plug ceramic, failed shift relay...
Never had one run bad yet for a check engine light (since check engine lights came out) ......... not to say it does not happen........... I usually get rid of them at 225K

Oh GMs should had said so ....... No wonder ....... As my friends say GM junk (Just Kidding)

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Old 04-16-2020, 03:33 PM   #19
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Never had one run bad yet for a check engine light (since check engine lights came out) ......... not to say it does not happen........... I usually get rid of them at 225K

Oh GMs should had said so ....... No wonder ....... As my friends say GM junk (Just Kidding)

On my cars, was on Toyotas and Fords! The GM ones were on cars that were being tested on the proving grounds in a VERY tough environment. Probably would be more if I owned a FIAT product...of course, I would never own a FIAT product.
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Old 04-16-2020, 04:46 PM   #20
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Oops 2005 was not a Fiat product. It was Daimler/ Chrysler of course.
Anyway, those codes should be looked into, OBD2 started in 1996, prior to that it was OBD1 and ALDL courtesy of GM; assembly line data link.
Keep in mind the code is not a diagnosis.
So here is a brief start of info for you.
Anatomy of the DTC: OBD2 Codes Explained

February 18, 2011

A DTC is made up of 5 digits. Knowing the composition of the code makes it is easier to trouble shoot a DTC without knowing the description of the code.

Here is a breakdown of what each digit of the code means.

[accordion auto_height=”false” ui_theme=”ui-smoothness”][accordion_panel title=”First Character – System“]The first character identifies identifies the system related to the trouble code.
P = Powertrain
B = Body
C = Chassis
U = Undefined [/accordion_panel] [accordion_panel title=”Second Digit – Code Type“]The second digit identifies whether the code is a generic code (same on all OBD-II equipped vehicles), or a manufacturer specific code.
0 = Generic (this is the digit zero — not the letter “O”)
1 = Enhanced (manufacturer specific) [/accordion_panel] [accordion_panel title=”Third Digit – Sub-System“]The third digit denotes the type of sub-system that pertains to the code
1 = Emission Management (Fuel or Air)
2 = Injector Circuit (Fuel or Air)
3 = Ignition or Misfire
4 = Emission Control
5 = Vehicle Speed & Idle Control
6 = Computer & Output Circuit
7 = Transmission
8 = Transmission
9 = SAE Reserved
0 = SAE Reserved [/accordion_panel] [accordion_panel title=”Fourth and Fifth Digits“]These digits, along with the others, are variable, and relate to a particular problem. [/accordion_panel] [/accordion]
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