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Old 10-08-2020, 07:11 PM   #21
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I just purchased my first TT (Rockwood 2507s). So how do I lift one side of a double axel trailer so I can spin the free tire to hear if there is anything in the tire? I have only the standard leveling blocks. How do you lift a trailer?
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Old 10-08-2020, 07:13 PM   #22
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Trailer Aid Google it. Works great. Used it today.
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Old 10-08-2020, 07:53 PM   #23
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Fyi
Woot.com has the TST TPMS on sale for $231.56


Sounds like a good deal.
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Old 10-09-2020, 06:12 AM   #24
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I had a front wheel blowout on my truck at 70 mph when not towing. It pulled me into the adjacent lane (fortunately empty), ruined the rim, and damaged the truck body. Next time I get tires, I'm installing on my TV.
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Old 10-09-2020, 06:44 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by dbsfgiants View Post
I just purchased my first TT (Rockwood 2507s). So how do I lift one side of a double axel trailer so I can spin the free tire to hear if there is anything in the tire? I have only the standard leveling blocks. How do you lift a trailer?
This is the proper way to lift your Rockwood with Dexter Torflex axles. I keep a 12 ton bottle jack on board for this purpose.
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Old 10-09-2020, 07:40 AM   #26
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I'm not a Luddite or anti-tech by any means, but is TPMS technology really worth the trouble? In my experience they often alert falsely, or cause other problems, including during tire changes. Why not just inspect tires visually and check inflation before every trip?
Yes, it is worth the trouble (and the expense).

No, mine has never alerted falsely.

No, problems are not caused during tire changes. Just make sure that sensors are placed on the correct tire. Alerts will sound when you take a sensor off. That is good. Just silence the alarm and keep changing the tire.

Why not check tires during stops? Because if a problem develops, it is most dangerous while traveling, not while stopped. I find it difficult to check my tires while moving—except with a TPMS.

Folks, get one if you don’t have one.
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Old 10-09-2020, 10:38 AM   #27
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Don’t you thing all who had this happen send picture and statements to the. NTSB, not just seller?
Manufacturer 1st, NTSB 2nd. Manufacturer can (and likely will) act way faster and WAY more effectively.
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Old 10-09-2020, 10:50 AM   #28
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In addition to all the great reasons already listed for why TPMS makes sense and is a no-brainer for most trailers--

IT IS SUPER-CONVENIENT TO SEE TWELVE TIRE PRESSURES FROM THE COMFORT OF YOUR SEAT as opposed to getting out the tire gauge and shlepping around your rig removing the valve caps and hoping not to lose any air as you check each tire.

It is also great peace of mind. You will never be tempted to say to self "I just checked yesterday, and I'm in a hurry and don't need to check now." Instead, you will be checking your pressure for fun.

So anyone who thinks having a TPMS is "inconvenient," think again. You will never not like having your pressure and temperature displayed on a display for your convenience and you will NEVER, EVER be displeased that you can see your pressure and temperature traveling down the road.

Even if you have only 6, 8 or 10 tires, you will always appreciate the convenience.
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Old 10-09-2020, 11:10 AM   #29
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NHTSA and it's done right here: https://www-odi.nhtsa.dot.gov/VehicleComplaint/

Even Forest River's paperwork says to notify the NHTSA of safety issues. Oddly, FR does not also provide a contact to report the issues directly to them.

RAy
You make a very interesting point. I have not seen the paperwork to which you refer, but your assertion is confirmed at https://forestriverinc.com/Contact-Us

I would still notify any manufacturer immediately, for a variety of reasons, not the least of which is that the manufacturer can act way faster and WAY more effectively. ALSO, (unless RV mfgrs have successfully lobbied for immunity that has not come to my attention) a written notice carries immediate legal implications that will encourage them to act before the NTSB gets involved. ALSO, any manufacturer is going to take immediate action with a supplier that puts them at legal liability risk.

If anyone hears from a manufacturer that they prefer not to hear about a safety problem (i.e: "Tell NTSB, not us), I hope it is immediately reported to this thread.
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Old 10-09-2020, 12:04 PM   #30
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I don’t see any problem with Rockwood or TST here. I do see sabotage.

The internal monitor is secured with one continuous metal strap. I assume one would cut of the excess, but that is only one piece. If the TST was installed prior to tire mounting then the cutoff piece would fall on the floor. If the ring was mounted by breaking the bead seal on one side then it’s highly likely the excess part could fall into the tire. That would be carelessness but we’ve come to expect that from the workforce at all FR locations. However, the OP showed there were several pieces removed from the tire(s).

That was definitely not carelessness...it was intentional.
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Old 10-09-2020, 01:01 PM   #31
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This is admittedly not my area of expertise. But I have a question - Wouldn't the biggest impact of this be wandering imbalance? At walking speed the pieces would bounce around in there, but at anything faster than a couple of mph they would be held firmly against the inside surface of the tire through centripetal force. Until you stop. Then they would fall free and move to a new position.

I'm not suggesting that it's ok that they were in there - obviously it’s not. I am just questioning the assumption that these pieces would be bouncing around in there while you are driving down the road. Physics would suggest that they are not.

Thanks for any insight
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Old 10-09-2020, 02:26 PM   #32
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FYI, I have passed this on to the GM of that plant. The place they buy the tires, installs the sensors and mounts the tire, so this would not have been an employee of Rockwood, but of the tire supplier.
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Old 10-09-2020, 02:36 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by Qwkynuf View Post
This is admittedly not my area of expertise. But I have a question - Wouldn't the biggest impact of this be wandering imbalance? At walking speed the pieces would bounce around in there, but at anything faster than a couple of mph they would be held firmly against the inside surface of the tire through centripetal force. Until you stop. Then they would fall free and move to a new position.

I'm not suggesting that it's ok that they were in there - obviously it’s not. I am just questioning the assumption that these pieces would be bouncing around in there while you are driving down the road. Physics would suggest that they are not.

Thanks for any insight
I think you have centripetal force confused with centrifugal force.
https://www.livescience.com/52488-ce...al-forces.html

https://www.diffen.com/difference/Ce...tripetal_Force
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Old 10-09-2020, 02:44 PM   #34
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Not going to sidetrack this thread with a discussion about Newtonian Physics, but I knew what I meant.

In any case, the choice of word has no effect on whether the debris is pressed against the inner surface of the tire while the tire is in motion. So your response was both incorrect *and* unhelpful. Thank you.
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Old 10-09-2020, 05:00 PM   #35
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FYI, I have passed this on to the GM of that plant. The place they buy the tires, installs the sensors and mounts the tire, so this would not have been an employee of Rockwood, but of the tire supplier.

Excellent. Sounds like the right people are on top of it.
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Old 10-09-2020, 05:28 PM   #36
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Centripetal force is the one that keeps the object moving in a circle. It is a force pulling into or pushing into the center of a system. In the case of orbiting objects, that force is gravity. If you are swinging an object around on a string, the force pulling on the string is the centripetal force. In the case of objects inside the tire, the tire itself pushes on the metal pieces to keep them from flying out of the tires.

“Centrifugal force” is the name applied to a seeming force on an object causing it to fly away from circular motion. It is actually the momentum of an object as it tends to move in a constant direction at a constant speed.

The seeming “centrifugal force” in combination with the centripetal force exerted by the inside of the tire can hold the metal pieces affixed to a spot on the inside of the tire.
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Old 10-09-2020, 06:37 PM   #37
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Centripetal force is the one that keeps the object moving in a circle. It is a force pulling into or pushing into the center of a system. In the case of orbiting objects, that force is gravity. If you are swinging an object around on a string, the force pulling on the string is the centripetal force. In the case of objects inside the tire, the tire itself pushes on the metal pieces to keep them from flying out of the tires.

“Centrifugal force” is the name applied to a seeming force on an object causing it to fly away from circular motion. It is actually the momentum of an object as it tends to move in a constant direction at a constant speed.

The seeming “centrifugal force” in combination with the centripetal force exerted by the inside of the tire can hold the metal pieces affixed to a spot on the inside of the tire.

That's the way I was taught back in the last century too

The issue with the sharp pieces isn't whether they're held against the inner liner of the tire when vehicle is under way. The issue is their sharp edges and the fact that they will tumble in the tire at slow speed just like in a rock tumbler and the sharp edges will nick the inner liner each time they hit. Given time the inner liner is compromised and air can then migrate into the cord body (only takes a pinhole or two) and a separation begins.

The inner liner is not like tubes of old. They are thin elastomeric films running about 15 mils and their only job is to block air molecules from entering the cord body.

If the sharp pieces actually stayed in one place there wouldn't a big issue. We know that centrifugal force goes away when one stops and doesn't return until tire speed increased enough to overcome their weight so damage is certainly not unexpected.
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Old 10-13-2020, 08:56 AM   #38
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I'm not a Luddite or anti-tech by any means, but is TPMS technology really worth the trouble? In my experience they often alert falsely, or cause other problems, including during tire changes. Why not just inspect tires visually and check inflation before every trip?
One of the best things about TPMS is the peace of mind it gives you. I actually look at the monitor maybe every hour. Before, I was looking at my mirrors every 5 or 10 minutes checking for flapping rubber on the TT. Now, I have an alarm that will notify me of problems. And, I've never had a false alarm.
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Old 10-13-2020, 09:43 AM   #39
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Yes, it is worth the trouble (and the expense).

No, mine has never alerted falsely.

Folks, get one if you don’t have one.

Roger that!

I have been using a $70 el cheapo for 3 years. No problem. Works as advertised. The display is very small. I saw a TST on sale on Woot for $ 236. Jumped on it. Waiting on delivery.


A TPMS should be every RVers first upgrade!


Your mileage may vary :-)
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Old 10-13-2020, 11:43 AM   #40
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I'm not a Luddite or anti-tech by any means, but is TPMS technology really worth the trouble? In my experience they often alert falsely, or cause other problems, including during tire changes. Why not just inspect tires visually and check inflation before every trip?



Isn't it amazing that some of us (me included) have driven well of half a million miles in vehicles without TPMS? And even towed 10,000+ miles without it?!! What on earth were we thinking - that we could just make sure tires are inflated properly and their condition roadworthy? Oh, that's right, this latest gadget wasn't invented yet. And yes, TPMS systems DO fail and give false alarms. They create a new expense for you when you change tires or get damaged by incompetent tire techs (who subsequently deny responsibility).
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