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Old 07-27-2015, 04:21 PM   #21
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8Mbps is way more speed than you realize. That is 8 megabits per second, not megabytes per second. At 8Mbps, a 4 gigabyte file would be downloaded in less than a minute.
I completely disagree with this...

8Mbps is roughly 1MB/s since there are 8 bits to the byte. Given that, the 4GB (4000MB) file would take 4000 seconds to download, which is more or less an hour (66 minutes), a far cry from less than a minute.

Download time calculator
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Old 07-27-2015, 04:33 PM   #22
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I completely disagree with this...

8Mbps is roughly 1MB/s since there are 8 bits to the byte. Given that, the 4GB (4000MB) file would take 4000 seconds to download, which is more or less an hour (66 minutes), a far cry from less than a minute.

Download time calculator
My apologies. You are correct. I used the same data calculator, but used 4 megabytes. I knew that sounded wrong! I guess that will teach me to triple check next time.

Back OT, my original post was to help save on taxes. Sorry for the incorrect info on data transfers.
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Old 07-27-2015, 04:41 PM   #23
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I completely disagree with this...

8Mbps is roughly 1MB/s since there are 8 bits to the byte. Given that, the 4GB (4000MB) file would take 4000 seconds to download, which is more or less an hour (66 minutes), a far cry from less than a minute.

Download time calculator
So you agree that a FOUR GB file would be around FOUR hours? You can see the major difference in DL time between 8MBits per second and 40+ MBits per second.... Like 5X the difference.....

As in my previous post, we always figured *approx* 10 to 1 ratio; there are a few (2-3 ??) extra bits per byte; they are used for parity checking and other "overhead".

But you are right, the DL figures posted baddman are grossly incorrect. Again, not taking anything away from him.

BTW, my own experience is 42+ years in the IT industry doing everything from software development, network administration, database design/administration, hardware installation/maintenance, etc, etc, etc.

It never seems to end for me..... Today (at 72) I'm doing Android (cell phone) application development; mostly just for something to do, as I full time my way around the Western US.

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Old 07-27-2015, 05:12 PM   #24
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So you agree that a FOUR GB file would be around FOUR hours? You can see the major difference in DL time between 8MBits per second and 40+ MBits per second.... Like 5X the difference.....

As in my previous post, we always figured *approx* 10 to 1 ratio; there are a few (2-3 ??) extra bits per byte; they are used for parity checking and other "overhead".

But you are right, the DL figures posted baddman are grossly incorrect. Again, not taking anything away from him.

BTW, my own experience is 42+ years in the IT industry doing everything from software development, network administration, database design/administration, hardware installation/maintenance, etc, etc, etc.

It never seems to end for me..... Today (at 72) I'm doing Android (cell phone) application development; mostly just for something to do, as I full time my way around the Western US.

Boowho??
I apologized for the mistake. I was trying to offer a solution to your problem, but I can see that it doesn't meet your needs.

Maybe someone else will offer up a better idea that will help.
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Old 07-27-2015, 06:04 PM   #25
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I apologized for the mistake. I was trying to offer a solution to your problem, but I can see that it doesn't meet your needs.

Maybe someone else will offer up a better idea that will help.
Hope you don't think I was slamming you..... I do appreciate what you've said, PLUS I've learned something I did not know..... A good lesson.... EVERYONE can always learn something new.

I'm still happy with AT&T *service*, just think their CS sux!!

Cheers!!

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Old 07-27-2015, 06:10 PM   #26
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No worries at all! Happy RVing!
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Old 07-27-2015, 06:26 PM   #27
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I install apps & updates when I am on WiFi & then my apps run fine at 3G speeds since stuff is not updating in the background...
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Old 07-28-2015, 12:47 PM   #28
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So you agree that a FOUR GB file would be around FOUR hours? You can see the major difference in DL time between 8MBits per second and 40+ MBits per second.... Like 5X the difference.....
Trying desperately not to

But, actually I do not agree that 4GB file on 8mbps (M-bits-ps) download pipe would be 4 hours. Based on your 10-1 ratio of bits to bytes then that gives you .8MBps (M-bytes-ps). Since there's 4000MB in 4GB, then 4000MB/.8MBps gives you 5000 seconds. Which when divided by 60 seconds to the minute, gives you 83 minutes, or about 1.3 hours not 4 hours. In the image below, the closest thing to 8Mbps is the 10Mbps, so the timing is off a bit but still in the ballpark of an hour, and not anywhere close to 4 hours.

I do agree that 40+Mbps is a huge difference from 8mbps and I also have seen 40+Mbps download on 4gLTE over Verizon on lightly loaded towers, so it is possible to get those speeds.



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BTW, my own experience is 42+ years in the IT industry doing everything from software development, network administration, database design/administration, hardware installation/maintenance, etc, etc, etc.
A kindred spirit... I'm an Oracle DBA for 20 years at age 42, and have been building computers since age 13. Currently managing a team of 16 DBAs in a shared services remote management model. Myself and my team are 100% remote and virtual, so its my intention to begin working from the road in a couple years instead of at home.

Not sure why, but I thought you were a truck driver from reading a different thread. I could've remembered incorrectly.
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Old 07-28-2015, 12:54 PM   #29
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As in my previous post, we always figured *approx* 10 to 1 ratio; there are a few (2-3 ??) extra bits per byte; they are used for parity checking and other "overhead".
I can understand using 10 to 1 when figuring something like how many bytes are in a kilobyte. Saying 1000 instead of 1024 but never in my life have I heard of 2-3 "extra" bits in a byte.

1 byte = 8 bits ALWAYS.
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Old 07-28-2015, 01:20 PM   #30
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I can understand using 10 to 1 when figuring something like how many bytes are in a kilobyte. Saying 1000 instead of 1024 but never in my life have I heard of 2-3 "extra" bits in a byte.

1 byte = 8 bits ALWAYS.
You're 100% correct in terms of storage 1byte = 8bits, but this is not storage this is throughput on a network which has keep alive packets, verification and error correction, and other overhead which is included in the total throughput. So for each byte of data you send you actually send closer to 1.1 - 1.15 bytes of network traffic. The 2-3 bits Boowho was referring to was on average the overhead on a typical TCP/IP network for the overhead I described above. Someone much smarter than me describes it better here. I'm not a network engineer, but I do know that there is way more information passing along that network pipe besides the "data" bytes that we are trying to send. Things that help with routing etc...

TCP Over IP Bandwidth Overhead - Packet Pushers Podcast
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Old 07-28-2015, 01:24 PM   #31
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You're 100% correct in terms of storage 1byte = 8bits, but this is not storage this is throughput on a network which has keep alive packets, verification and error correction, and other overhead which is included in the total throughput. So for each byte of data you send you actually send closer to 1.1 - 1.15 bytes of network traffic. The 2-3 bits Boowho was referring to was on average the overhead on a typical TCP/IP network for the overhead I described above. Someone much smarter than me describes it better here. I'm not a network engineer, but I do know that there is way more information passing along that network pipe besides the "data" bytes that we are trying to send. Things that help with routing etc...

TCP Over IP Bandwidth Overhead - Packet Pushers Podcast
Didn't even think of that. I know very little about networking. I'll stick to coding.
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Old 07-28-2015, 04:02 PM   #32
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Trying desperately not to

Not sure why, but I thought you were a truck driver from reading a different thread. I could've remembered incorrectly.
NO you got it right.

The middle 42 (or so) years of my working career were IT, but at the end I DID drive 18-wheeler. Quite a difference from wearing three piece suits for much of my life; then embark on one of the dirtiest jobs around.

Oh, the first four years were as a commercial pilot (NOT airlines, but general aviation and corporate stuff).

Jack of all trades and master of none???

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Old 07-28-2015, 04:08 PM   #33
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You're 100% correct in terms of storage 1byte = 8bits, but this is not storage this is throughput on a network which has keep alive packets, verification and error correction, and other overhead which is included in the total throughput. So for each byte of data you send you actually send closer to 1.1 - 1.15 bytes of network traffic. The 2-3 bits Boowho was referring to was on average the overhead on a typical TCP/IP network for the overhead I described above. Someone much smarter than me describes it better here. I'm not a network engineer, but I do know that there is way more information passing along that network pipe besides the "data" bytes that we are trying to send. Things that help with routing etc...

TCP Over IP Bandwidth Overhead - Packet Pushers Podcast
You explained it quite well for IWriteCode. He is correct in absolutes, 8 bits always equal 1 byte. I just use the 10 to 1 ratio and that's close enough for government work.

Although, if we REALLY want to get into it, we could start talking about ISI-OSI "onion" AKA, the 6 level TCP/IP stack, etc, etc, etc ad nauseum!!

But we better just let go of this, before some readers are ready to barf at all this techno-speak!!



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Old 09-22-2015, 05:22 PM   #34
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