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Old 11-30-2020, 03:03 PM   #21
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Alternative Repair: Drill out the hole and thread for 1/4”-20 screw

You might be boondocking when your water pump fails, so that you don’t have the time or location to get a helical coil insert for the repair. In this case, you might consider just boring out the hole and threading a 1/4” screw into it. The parts for this will be available in a lot of small towns where you might be boon-docking. The correct drill bit for a 1/4”-20 screw is the same #7 as for a 12-32 Heli-coil, so you aren’t taking any more or less material out as if you were using a Heli-coil. And, if you don’t have a numbered drill set, you would be fine with a 13/64” drill bit. Of course, you also need a 1/4-20 tap, but that size might be available at a lot of hardware stores. I carry a few old taps with me in my motorhome, so this solution would work for me in a pinch.

[Note that since the 1/4-20 repair and the 10-32 coil repair both drill out the same size #7 hole, I am in error with my earlier claim that drilling for a larger screw would damage the boss nipple of the Shurflo pump more than a coil repair.]

There are two downsides to this type of repair. First, it requires you to bore out the holes in the pump head for the larger screw. I haven’t checked to be sure, but I think this would miss crucial items like the diaphragm and drive assembly plate. Second, it is not as strong as a coil system, since it does not push out into the threads, like a coil would.

I’ll leave you with a one more measurement. The outer diameter of a 10-32 screw is 0.186”. If you want to go to a larger screw, you need a hole that is at least this diameter to clear out the old damaged threads. This pushes you do using a 14-20 screw (#10 or 0.1935” hole) or the 1/4-20 screw (0.2010” hole for a #7 drill, or a 0.203125” hole for 13/64” drill). A 12-24 screw will not clear out the old threads and a 14-20 screw is pretty rare, so the best choice is a 1/4-20 screw.

Gordon
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Old 12-10-2020, 04:43 PM   #22
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Update on the EZ-Lok repair kit

I found that the STI tap provided in the EZ-Lok 10-32 kit produced threads that caused a 10-32 screw to bind. I checked and found that it didn't have 32 Threads per Inch. I couldn't figure out the pitch. But, I contacted the EZ-Lok customer service from their website. They apologized for the problem and sent me a replacement tap that was 32 TPI. It worked properly. They sent me a Helix-Coil bottoming tap, not their brand! Maybe all of their 10-32 kits have the wrong tap.

Moral of the story with any of these kits: check the tap pitch against the screw before using it. And, test it on some scrap first. Otherwise, E-Z Lok is a reputable company.

Also, I checked their literature more closely, and it shows that they have a diamond-shaped cross-section in their helical coil, so I mis-spoke when claiming it is round. But, the corners might be slightly rounded.

–Gordon
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Old 12-10-2020, 05:31 PM   #23
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I just 30 mins ago replaced my Shurflo 4008 (3 GPM) because the check valve failed - twice!!!

Here’s what I just installed:

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It’s a Seaflow 51 series.... puts out 5.5 GPM and is SUPER quiet.... So much easier than ordering a new check valve - again.... Plus lots more water which is great for showers...

COST - $109.00
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Old 12-10-2020, 08:28 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ernest917 View Post
I just 30 mins ago replaced my Shurflo 4008 (3 GPM) because the check valve failed - twice!!!

Here’s what I just installed:

Attachment 244378
Attachment 244379
Attachment 244380

It’s a Seaflow 51 series.... puts out 5.5 GPM and is SUPER quiet.... So much easier than ordering a new check valve - again.... Plus lots more water which is great for showers...

COST - $109.00
Did the mounting holes line up with the Shurflo?

Ray
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Old 12-10-2020, 08:32 PM   #25
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They did not.... I drilled new ones and filled old ones with silicone....

This new pump is sooooo much quieter than my old one....

Old one sounded like a jackhammer and this one is a soft purrrrr...

Plus - almost twice the water flow (comes with 4 yr warranty)
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Old 12-10-2020, 08:33 PM   #26
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I am assuming the original screws are self tapping into the plastic housing. Anything I've seen in helicoils are machine screw threads meaning new screws as well. Helicoil Kits and inserts aren't cheap and you'll probably want to have the pump out to do it. You could take a handful of small tie wraps and cut a tab to go into the damaged thread. When you reinsert the screw and tighten the screw into the nylon tab the screw will deform the nylon into the thread. Probably hold just fine. Remember when installing any fastener that that has previously gone into plastic, turn ccw 1st until you feel it drop into the previous thread, then tighten. Prevents you from cross threading/stripping out
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Old 12-10-2020, 10:47 PM   #27
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Hmm...

Quote:
Originally Posted by jeff64 View Post
I am assuming the original screws are self tapping into the plastic housing. Anything I've seen in helicoils are machine screw threads meaning new screws as well.
That's not right. The identification helicoil type products is the internal thread size. The outside (what you drill and tap for is a custom size. The thread pitch is (obviously) the same, but the O.D. matches no standard.
Quote:
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Helicoil Kits and inserts aren't cheap and you'll probably want to have the pump out to do it.
Worth every penny when you only want to fix it once. And worth the time it takes to do the job right.
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Originally Posted by jeff64 View Post
You could take a handful of small tie wraps and cut a tab to go into the damaged thread. When you reinsert the screw and tighten the screw into the nylon tab the screw will deform the nylon into the thread. Probably hold just fine.
Probably is the key word here. Do you really want to risk your vacation being spoiled because you took the easy or cheap path? What if the pack-the-hole trip simply split the white-metal ear on the pump when you forced the machine screw in? What if the pump crapped out on the first day of your five-day boondock trip? You would be lying on your back with a bucket, drawing water from the fresh water tank drain. Better hope you have a valve and not a screw-on cap.
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Originally Posted by jeff64 View Post
Remember when installing any fastener that that has previously gone into plastic, turn ccw 1st until you feel it drop into the previous thread, then tighten. Prevents you from cross threading/stripping out
This is good advice, the only part of the post I agree with.
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Old 12-10-2020, 11:24 PM   #28
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I’m sorry... I guess I approach things differently.....

Just seems like a lot of hassle trying to fix an issue that has no guarantees the fix will actually work....

A new water pump solves it 100%...

So to me it boils down to a 100% fix or a “fix” that might fail when you’re out on the middle of nowhere leaving you “high and dry” in more ways than one...
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Old 12-10-2020, 11:28 PM   #29
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Obviously...

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Originally Posted by ernest917 View Post
I’m sorry... I guess I approach things differently.....

Just seems like a lot of hassle trying to fix an issue that has no guarantees the fix will actually work....

A new water pump solves it 100%...

So to me it boils down to a 100% fix or a “fix” that might fail when you’re out on the middle of nowhere leaving you “high and dry” in more ways than one...
Obviously you did not watch the video that Gordon posted early in this thread. It showed that Heli-Coil repairs were STRONGER than initial threads into the material.

I recommended this option (Heli-Coils, not bubblegum or tie wraps) because I have complete faith in it.
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Old 12-11-2020, 12:14 AM   #30
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I still say there’s the strong possibly that a complete seal might no be achieved which would lead to a leaking pump... (experience speaking here)

My next question would be - how old is this pump??? Is it really worth the hassle???
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Old 12-11-2020, 09:15 AM   #31
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Quote:
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My next question would be - how old is this pump??? Is it really worth the hassle???
I think most of us would have this same question, and I think most of us would decide to replace and upgrade the 6 year old water pump.
BUT, If I had time and inclination, I might use the helicoil method described so well to fix the old pump and have a spare that I could use in several areas. Best of both worlds!
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Old 12-11-2020, 10:46 AM   #32
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It all depends on where you're at when the problem occurs and what you can lay your hands on quick to cure the problem. If I were out in the middle of nowhere and bubblegum, tie wraps and duck tape were what I had with me... if I were at home doing nada, I'd buy a new pump too
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Old 12-11-2020, 05:55 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ernest917 View Post
I just 30 mins ago replaced my Shurflo 4008 (3 GPM) because the check valve failed - twice!!!

Here’s what I just installed:

Attachment 244378
Attachment 244379
Attachment 244380

It’s a Seaflow 51 series.... puts out 5.5 GPM and is SUPER quiet.... So much easier than ordering a new check valve - again.... Plus lots more water which is great for showers...

COST - $109.00
Ernest,
The Seaflow 51 water pump looks like a nice and inexpensive solution. It's nice to have it quiet. Let us know if it works well for a year or two. It could be a good solution for a lot of people.

–cheers, Gordon
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Old 12-11-2020, 06:18 PM   #34
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I'm so impressed with the coil inserts that I bought a Metric set

I've really been bitten by the bug of interest in these coil inserts. While I used them to fix the stripped threads on my water pump, I can imagine a lot of uses for them in my shop and in repairs for my motorhome.

For example, we've got a lot of aluminum components in our coaches and that is where we can have problems with stripped threads. Since the coil inserts are an upgrade rather than a repair, they can be very useful. For example, I wrote about my repair to sagging steps on my coach at https://www.forestriverforums.com/fo...ml#post2177789. My repair involved screwing the steel frame of the step box to the aluminum coach frame where it goes around the door. I used #14 self-tapping screws and crossed my fingers (it still works), because I feel that this is just marginally strong enough to do the job. If they give me trouble again, I'll use coil inserts and be much more confident in the durability of the repair.

So, I thought it would be handy to have a bunch of these inserts around for different size screws and bolts. My search found expensive kits from Heli-Coil for SAE screws, and that was a little too much for my budget. But, I noticed that there are several Amazon vendors of metric screw insert sets. And they all seem to be selling the same set in a red case for repairing M5 M6 M8 M10 M12 screws. This covers the SAE range from #10 to 7/16". The idea is to switch from an SAE screw to a metric screw.

So, I ordered this Amazon Canada set https://www.amazon.ca/Stripped-Threa...4274QC23TBC0PY
for C$46.95. There are lots of alternative suppliers of this same kit and they all have reasonable prices. The manufacturer seems to be in China, but the quality seems to be first rate. I bought my numbered drill bit set while visiting Shanghai in the early 90s and was impressed with the quality (and price) when I got it. The phone in my pocket was made in China for a company called Apple, and it is well-built. These coil inserts seem to be an example of a well-made Chinese product.

The kit came promptly, and I've tested it with M6 and M8 helical threads installed in a piece of aluminum just over 1/8" thick. Once installed, I found that they held very well. In my view, the repair was as good as if the original screws had been installed in steel of the same thickness.

–Gordon
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Old 12-14-2020, 06:29 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeff64 View Post
I am assuming the original screws are self tapping into the plastic housing. Anything I've seen in helicoils are machine screw threads meaning new screws as well. Helicoil Kits and inserts aren't cheap and you'll probably want to have the pump out to do it. You could take a handful of small tie wraps and cut a tab to go into the damaged thread. When you reinsert the screw and tighten the screw into the nylon tab the screw will deform the nylon into the thread. Probably hold just fine. Remember when installing any fastener that that has previously gone into plastic, turn ccw 1st until you feel it drop into the previous thread, then tighten. Prevents you from cross threading/stripping out


Thanks for the hint of using the tab of a tie wrap. I had a stripped thread in a metal part of a cabinet hinge. The nylon worked great in making the screw hold tight
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