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Old 02-16-2020, 02:26 PM   #1
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10 ply tires

Going to be replacing tires on my gmc 1500 truck. I am thinking very hard about going to a 10 ply tire. Does anyone have any advice or input thanks Click image for larger version

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Old 02-16-2020, 02:31 PM   #2
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10 plys are better for towing. However, I'd never out retreads on a tow vehicle. I know they've come a long way but I have some people I know that have tried them in the past and will now only use them on a trail-only rig.
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Old 02-16-2020, 03:20 PM   #3
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If you want Retread/Remold tires go ahead and buy these.

They claim that "retreaded tires" use pre-cured rubber which is only partially true.

Maybe those that use the "Bandag" process for for many decades pre-cured treads on Passenger and LT tires has been replaced by the process of extruding uncured rubber onto a prepared carcass using a machine called an "Orbitread". The "built" casing is then placed in a mold where the rubber is cured with it's new tread.

Call it a re-tread, re-mold, or whatever name you want to market it under, the quality of the finished tire depends on the quality of the casing the new tread is applied to.

Most of them have already lived out their intended life and it's possible you are getting a "retread" with a casing that may have even been recovered from an auto salvage yard where it ended up after an accident. Age of casing? Your guess is as good as mine.

Like the old saying, "If you want prime, good quality, oats, be prepared to pay the price. If you will be satisfied with oats that have been through the horse already, they will cost less".

If you go with the Treadwright's, good luck and make sure to keep your proof of purchase handy so you can use their warranty. Id advise just buying some NEW "China Bombs" rather than the retreads.

https://www.treadwright.com/pages/why-treadwright
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Old 02-16-2020, 03:24 PM   #4
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I didnít know they were retreads. I thought they was new tires. I donít want remold or reread. I will keep looking
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Old 02-16-2020, 03:28 PM   #5
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My goal is to beef my truck up a little. I am add a leaf spring and putting a trans cooler and heavy duty brakes all the way around
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Old 02-16-2020, 03:29 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielabram71 View Post
I didn’t know they were retreads. I thought they was new tires. I don’t want remold or reread. I will keep looking
I'm surprised that there are still any retreader's out there selling smaller tires.

Makes sense on large sizes for trucks, buses, and off road mining/construction equipment but you will usually find that those tires are build in the factory to specifications that allow multiple "Re-groove/Re-Molding". Carcass will also be marked with the number of times that can be done before it has to be disposed.


Added by edit:

Further reading, Treadwright apparently is a single location company and sells tires for Off-Road applications like "Mudding", "Rock Crawling", etc. NOT for highway use although I'm sure some will hit the road on them anyway.
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Old 02-17-2020, 11:39 PM   #7
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I can't imagine running anything less than 10 ply on a truck. I think I'm pretty close to 10 ply on my car. But we live down a rough dirt road, and I learned years ago (after so many flats) to buy the right tires.
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Old 02-18-2020, 02:59 AM   #8
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I have 10 ply on my Sequoia. Original equipment was some type of “extended load” passenger tire that allowed all kinds of soft ride empty, and lots of trailer sway when towing.
The LR E 265/70X17 Goodrich ATs work great. Nice at eliminating tow vehicle wiggle. The ATs are not noisy.
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Old 02-18-2020, 06:21 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by RangeMaggotBob View Post
I can't imagine running anything less than 10 ply on a truck. I think I'm pretty close to 10 ply on my car. But we live down a rough dirt road, and I learned years ago (after so many flats) to buy the right tires.
The most important thing about tires is their load capacity. All Load Range E tires have a 10 ply rating. Their sidewalls will display the actual number of plies and the material they are made from; such as Polyester, Nylon or Steel. The tire's actual designated size, ply rating/load range and the amount of inflation pressure the tires are inflate to will determine just how much weight the tire can support. The vehicle's certification label will provide the minimum load capacity needed from the tires to safely operate THAT vehicle.
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