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Old 09-14-2019, 07:24 PM   #21
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What size wheels do you have on your truck, many of the newer trucks have 20 inch wheels. I have a 2015 Chevrolet 2500HD with stock 17 inch wheels. My bed height is 1 1/2 taller than my old 2001 GMC, but I still have 5 inches of clearance between top of bed rails and bottom of trailer. I use a standard 15K Reese hitch. My 5th wheel travel trailer sits level with the truck. Before I would entertain raising the trailer height, I would think about smaller diameter wheels.
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Old 09-16-2019, 10:26 PM   #22
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Based on the photo supplied, I would say you are "level enough" for most situations. Towing on highways and Interstates should offer no problems. If the upward "tilt" of your 5-er is simply because your new truck bed is higher than before, should be no problem. If the upward "tilt" is because of a big difference in weight distribution, that may be a problem.

I would proceed as usual, but take special care when entering or backing into campsites with sharp elevation differences between approach roadway and campsite roadway. There is a chance you could scrape the rear end of the trailer on sharp angles.

I rely on my co-pilot, aka "DW", to notify me if there is a chance of damaging contact between rear end of our 5-er and pavement, especially when backing in.
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Old 09-19-2019, 06:37 PM   #23
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I spoke with an engineer at Dexter regarding leveling with their Torflex axles when I went from an F150 to a 2500HD. I was almost 4” higher in front, 2” above level. They said that they should be “as close to level as possible” so that the load is evenly distributed. They also said that the leaf spring applications don’t have to worry about that since they’ll distribute the weight evenly inherently.
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Old 09-19-2019, 09:39 PM   #24
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Your biggest concern will be over loading your rear axle...I'd take this to a scale all loaded up and ready for camping to see how much weight is on the trailer axles. Divide that number by two and you have an idea how much weight each axle would carry WHEN LEVEL. Now add 15 - 20% to that number and you might be close for the added weight on your rear axle.
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Old 09-20-2019, 06:08 AM   #25
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Torsion axles

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Originally Posted by LTnTN View Post
I spoke with an engineer at Dexter regarding leveling with their Torflex axles when I went from an F150 to a 2500HD. I was almost 4” higher in front, 2” above level. They said that they should be “as close to level as possible” so that the load is evenly distributed. They also said that the leaf spring applications don’t have to worry about that since they’ll distribute the weight evenly inherently.
I lived with this for several years when I went from a Silverado to a SRW F350. It does move weight to the rear axle, and reduces the wheel well clearance. Dexter sells a kit to raise the camper, but one of my axles was Alco, and the kit wouldn't work for it. I finally bit the bullet and replaced the axles with a different start angle, and got it pretty close to level, with plenty of wheel well clearance. The axles were bolted on with 2 bolts on each side. The 4000# axles were around $600 each. If you are interested, we could have a private conversation about the process.
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Old 09-20-2019, 06:42 AM   #26
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If you have TPMS I would watch temps on rear tires .... I would not load behind axles ... I think it looks fine let us know after your first trip ...
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Old 09-20-2019, 10:23 AM   #27
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If you have TPMS I would watch temps on rear tires .... I would not load behind axles ... I think it looks fine let us know after your first trip ...
When I was running out of level, I regularly checked the rear tire temp and it was usually 10-15 degrees hotter than the front, maximum 125-130. I had calculated the expected difference in load front to rear and then took it to a scale and it was pretty close. Even with this, I never exceeded the tire or axle rating for the rear. My unit is rear kitchen, so I would expect some weight difference front to rear, so I don't know whether the weight difference was primarily the out of level or if the rear kitchen contributed. I haven't been back to the scale, now that I have leveled it up with the new axles.
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Old 09-20-2019, 11:03 AM   #28
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When I was running out of level, I regularly checked the rear tire temp and it was usually 10-15 degrees hotter than the front, maximum 125-130. I had calculated the expected difference in load front to rear and then took it to a scale and it was pretty close. Even with this, I never exceeded the tire or axle rating for the rear. My unit is rear kitchen, so I would expect some weight difference front to rear, so I don't know whether the weight difference was primarily the out of level or if the rear kitchen contributed. I haven't been back to the scale, now that I have leveled it up with the new axles.
Front tires can often run cooler than those on rear axle of tandem's. They get full cooling air while running down the highway and rears are in somewhat of a wind shadow.

Front to rear weight tends to equalize oon spring type suspensions. Torsion axles not so much.
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Old 09-20-2019, 11:20 AM   #29
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Front tires can often run cooler than those on rear axle of tandem's. They get full cooling air while running down the highway and rears are in somewhat of a wind shadow.

Front to rear weight tends to equalize oon spring type suspensions. Torsion axles not so much.
That would make sense . I am going to watch the temps closely next trip my recall is the tires are usually close in temp ..... I still think that with the many designs of these TT/5ver's how the load falls on, in front of or behind the axles make all the difference ... I put 22 lbs psi in my air assist springs before I hook up when done and leaving I stop on a quiet street and level the unit just 2-3 lbs
removed to bring it level.
.
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Old 09-20-2019, 03:06 PM   #30
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You will also find that tires on the "sunny side" will run a few degrees hotter than the shaded side.

One thing you can watch is where the edge of the wearing part of the tire stops as the tread joins the sidewall. This is real noticable if you've traveled on dirt/muddy roads then driven a few miles on clean, dry pavement.

If this marking is even on front and rear tires you should be just fine.

Clean tires, just rub some blackboard chalk over the shoulder and tread then see where the black edge ends up after a few miles of straight highway.

This is best done before making any sharp turns that will then cause a false indication.

If you have wear extending beyond the defined shoulder, and are at max pressure, you need a higher load range. Just thought I'd add this last part.
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Old 09-20-2019, 04:59 PM   #31
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I'm wondering when the manufacturers are going to raise the overall height of 5ers. All the trucks are taller now. My 2005 Duramax was significantly shorter than my 2014 is.


Someone suggested the lowering rear links, my BIL tried those on his Duramax and it put the axle almost on the bump stop so opted to flip the axles on his 5er instead
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Old 09-22-2019, 01:30 PM   #32
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Skid Wheels

I owned a 5'er with the same dilemma some time back. the trailer/truck bed clearance was not the problem, the problem I had was the rear end of the trailer scraped my sloped driveway entering and exiting. Also had to be very careful maneuvering thru uneven campground roads and gas station drives. I installed a pair of skid wheels - problem solved.

https://www.etrailer.com/s.aspx?qry=...pg-Skid_Wheels
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Old 09-23-2019, 07:43 AM   #33
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level out unit

I don't have a set up like yours, however level with tires is an option. Low profile on the truck or higher tires on the trailer if clearance is enough.


Good luck,
John
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