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Old 03-10-2020, 09:26 AM   #1
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Electric Tow Vehicle

Is anyone contemplating getting one of the new proposed Lordstown Motors electric pick ups as a Tow Vechicle? Would be interested in the reasons for your pros and cons.
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Old 03-10-2020, 09:36 AM   #2
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https://lordstownmotors.com/pages/endurance
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Old 03-10-2020, 09:46 AM   #3
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Electric vehicles do not yet meet my mission needs. They are great if you are commuting and can charge at both ends. They are not so great when towing a barn door down the road at 65 mph. We are all familiar with the decrease in mileage with gas engines while towing.

Think of the range decrease on an electric vehicle. Gasoline's energy density is significantly higher than current battery tech. I can't remember the number right now. There is also a lack of EV infrastructure to "refuel" outside of major cities. The campgrounds might let you plug in once you get there, but if you have to drive more than 250 miles you may not be able to make it.

I would be curious to know what the payload is on the Lordstown. Tow rating FWIW is nothing special.

EV's are really efficient compared to ICE vehicles. Over 90% efficient. Less moving parts and less maintenance overall. You also get full requested torque virtually instantly.

The main issue for me is battery tech. It is not yet ready for what I want it to do in an EV.
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Old 03-13-2020, 02:26 PM   #4
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1. What he said.
2. My current vehicles are still running.
3. I don't buy new vehicles.
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Old 03-13-2020, 02:48 PM   #5
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You can bet that 250 mi range they claim isn't when it's towing 7500 lbs.

I doubt it would meet any RV'ers needs, unless the only CG he pulls to is less than about 50 miles away. And with a 10 recharge time, you're only going to do that once a day, I'm guessing.
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Old 03-13-2020, 02:59 PM   #6
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A couple of "cons":

While our electricity is fairly cheap in Georgia we make most of our electricity by burning coal. So any environmental positives this truck, or even a Nissan Leaf, supposedly create are more than offset by burning coal to charge them. And the current electrical infrastructure wasn't designed, or rated, to support electric vehicles. We already have summer "brown outs"; an influx of electrical vehicles will make it even more interesting.

Vehicle specific the Range is still too low for anything but a local commuter type vehicle. Hopefully some day improved battery technology will "fix" this issue.

For now I'd prefer a hybrid over a pure electric truck.
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Old 03-13-2020, 03:51 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RedLdr1 View Post
A couple of "cons":

While our electricity is fairly cheap in Georgia we make most of our electricity by burning coal. So any environmental positives this truck, or even a Nissan Leaf, supposedly create are more than offset by burning coal to charge them. And the current electrical infrastructure wasn't designed, or rated, to support electric vehicles. We already have summer "brown outs"; an influx of electrical vehicles will make it even more interesting.

Vehicle specific the Range is still too low for anything but a local commuter type vehicle. Hopefully some day improved battery technology will "fix" this issue.

For now I'd prefer a hybrid over a pure electric truck.
I'm with you as long as it was a "plug-in hybrid".

I own a Chevy Volt (Gen 2) and it's been great for my needs. In the last two years I've purchased less than two tanks of gas as I drive it mostly inside a 25 mile radius.

If the battery bank and engine/generator could be scaled up to provide the same performance in a pickup with a GCWR of 12,000 lbs or so (6k truck, 6 k trailer) I wouldn't hesitate to consider one.

If nothing else it would solve the conundrum of having a truck with good mileage or one that has enough horsepower to pull a trailer. Electric would solve the mileage issue and the ability of a hybrid to utilize both a gas engine and battery power simultaneously would solve the issue of climbing steep hills.

To me it would seem that a truck would somewhat solve the issue of having enough room for batteries and with advances in battery tech in high gear there could be plenty of power for hills as well as extending fuel range.

Plug-in hybrid would also allow one to be independent of the charging grid. Camping one could merely charge from a generator (my volt is equipped with a mobile charging cord that would allow for a complete recharge in around 12 hours with only an 8 amp power source. A 1,000 watt inverter powered by a solar system would handle it nicely.
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Old 03-13-2020, 04:20 PM   #8
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They never mention payload, either. I'm betting the batteries will eat up lots of payload.
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Old 03-13-2020, 05:39 PM   #9
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I kinda like the Rivian R1t. Ugliness aside it has a lot of great features. If they made a hybrid bumper pull TT that was symbiotic with the truck and had enough reserves not to leave you stranded in the middle of nowhere. A solar powered tonneau cover along with solar panels on TT would be handy for boondocking.
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