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Old 01-12-2021, 09:20 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by llr View Post
I like the Blue Ox sway pro.

Since you won't need to return much weight to the front an Anderson hitch might be worth looking at, I have no experience with it but it is an interesting design and has good reviews.
DOing the same - NO noise. No hoist over bar to put the chains on. NO grease to get all over on the bars. NO disconnecting to back up.
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Old 01-13-2021, 09:33 AM   #42
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Something to think about which I have yet to see a good discussion of. How much WD is needed for a given hitch to provide sway protection. It's my understanding that the pure friction units increase the sway control as the pressure on the sliding metal surfaces increases. For a pure sway bar (no WD), that is the amount of tension applied when installing. I've read that on these, sway control is very negatively affected if they get wet. For certain, you can run a Propride or Hensley with zero WD and still get full sway control.

It is not the amount of WD, but rather properly sizing the spring bars to the actual tongue weight. With 800 pound bars and a 1000 pound tongue, you can get sway control, but you won't properly distribute the weight, however, if you have 900 pound TW and 1500 pound bars, you can darn near lift the rear axle but not have any sway control.

I learned that lesson on my last trailer by buying a 1500 Blue Ox. At the time of purchase I was planning to add a rack and generator to the a frame which would have put me at 1100 pounds. After purchase, too late at that point, I discovered that there was no way to mount the rack without interfering with the LP tanks, and lack of clearance between truck and trailer.

While the 1500 pound bars easily distributed the weight perfectly, the bars could not be tightened enough to provide sway control. Small SUV's passing by moved the trailer! I bought a set of 1000 pound bars and they worked perfectly both for weight transfer and sway control. Of course the next year I sold the trailer and hitch and now have a 5th wheel.
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Old 01-13-2021, 09:39 AM   #43
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Any good weight distributing hitck with sway control and sufficient load capacity will work fine. Everyone will have their own preference, and that is probably because that is what they started with and have always used. I use a Reese with 1200 lb bars and sway control, but not the small friction bar.
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Old 01-13-2021, 11:16 AM   #44
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Originally Posted by Bhrava View Post
It is not the amount of WD, but rather properly sizing the spring bars to the actual tongue weight. With 800 pound bars and a 1000 pound tongue, you can get sway control, but you won't properly distribute the weight, however, if you have 900 pound TW and 1500 pound bars, you can darn near lift the rear axle but not have any sway control.

I learned that lesson on my last trailer by buying a 1500 Blue Ox. At the time of purchase I was planning to add a rack and generator to the a frame which would have put me at 1100 pounds. After purchase, too late at that point, I discovered that there was no way to mount the rack without interfering with the LP tanks, and lack of clearance between truck and trailer.

While the 1500 pound bars easily distributed the weight perfectly, the bars could not be tightened enough to provide sway control. Small SUV's passing by moved the trailer! I bought a set of 1000 pound bars and they worked perfectly both for weight transfer and sway control. Of course the next year I sold the trailer and hitch and now have a 5th wheel.

Where this may be an issue, is for folks who are pulling relatively lighter trailers with the 3/4 and 1 ton trucks. If the tongue weight is handled by the truck with little sag, doesn't dialing up the WD bars still transfer weight to the truck's front axle? I've been following a discussion on another forum where there is a group commenting that improper WD levels can mess with the trucks designed over/under steer levels, possibly increasing vehicle instability. So for those with larger truck/smaller trailer setups, applying enough WD to obtain desired anti-sway could be causing more problems than solved. How does "properly sizing the spring bars" based solely on TW get to desired anti-sway levels on a 1-ton pulling a 5k lb trailer? It seems to me that for these setups, you need to go with lighter bars? Can you get light enough bars on say a Blue Ox to maintain proper over/under steer and still get optimal anti-sway? Another way of saying this, how much tension is required on the bars to get optimal anti-sway levels?
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Old 01-13-2021, 11:44 AM   #45
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Where this may be an issue, is for folks who are pulling relatively lighter trailers with the 3/4 and 1 ton trucks. If the tongue weight is handled by the truck with little sag, doesn't dialing up the WD bars still transfer weight to the truck's front axle? I've been following a discussion on another forum where there is a group commenting that improper WD levels can mess with the trucks designed over/under steer levels, possibly increasing vehicle instability. So for those with larger truck/smaller trailer setups, applying enough WD to obtain desired anti-sway could be causing more problems than solved. How does "properly sizing the spring bars" based solely on TW get to desired anti-sway levels on a 1-ton pulling a 5k lb trailer? It seems to me that for these setups, you need to go with lighter bars? Can you get light enough bars on say a Blue Ox to maintain proper over/under steer and still get optimal anti-sway? Another way of saying this, how much tension is required on the bars to get optimal anti-sway levels?

The difference between a 1/2 ton and 3/4-1ton is you don't see the sag, however, you don't "Need" to redistribute the weight with the medium duty trucks, but you do need to have some form of sway control. When using the WDH with 4 point sway you still have to set it up properly, which of course is to transfer weight in order to get proper spring tension required for the sway control to work. You still need to have the proper spring bars for the tongue weight of the trailer. Regardless of the truck, the exact same amount of weight is transferred with a properly sized WDH.

As far as the under/over steer, J2807 still requires WDH in the testing for all trucks regardless of weight class. It gives an even playing field for all trucks to meet certain criteria.

Sure you can tow a tag trailer with just a plain ball, but you do not get any anti-sway protection, and are just relying on the trucks electronics to protect you when a sway does happen. The trailer will still sway regardless of what is pulling it, just because it is a bigger truck doesn't automatically cancel the trailer from swaying.

Rule of thumb for any truck, when purchasing the WDH with antisway, make sure it has spring bars of 80% or more TW of the trailer, that's 800 pound minimum TW for 1000 pound bars.


My last trailer was a Coleman 274BH that I towed with a 1/2 ton for all but two trips. I used a standard round bar with 800 pound bars and a single sway brake on the 2014 F150, worked fine, never a stability problem. After I lost the 14 in a crash I replaced it with a 16, that hitch no longer functioned properly so I stepped up to a Blue Ox, BUT had the wrong bars since I had plans to add TW but didn't. I then got the proper bars, and it towed very nice. I then got a F350 and towed the same trailer using the same exact setup as the F150 and I could not even feel it back there. It didn't really make much change in the trucks stance but was set up exactly the same, same chain length, same tension, same ball height etc.

Now when I sold the trailer, I delivered it for them since their truck wasn't wired for brakes. The trailer was as empty as the day I brought it home, and tried towing without the WDH. Big mistake, I felt EVERY passing truck. It wasn't bad, but I felt it and knew having the bars attached stops it, so I grabbed the bars and put them back on, and world of difference, didn't feel it back there.
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Old 01-13-2021, 03:05 PM   #46
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...
As far as the under/over steer, J2807 still requires WDH in the testing for all trucks regardless of weight class. It gives an even playing field for all trucks to meet certain criteria.

...

There is no 'even playing field' for testing without a wdh...

The trucks are tested as individuals under SAE J2807. In the handling portion they are tested to determine limits for weight carrying (no wdh), weight distributing (with a wdh) and fifth wheel.

My truck was tested without a wdh up its' limits with no requirement for a wdh.
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Old 01-13-2021, 05:14 PM   #47
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The towing tables for my F350 say it will easily handle my 28' TT with or without a WDH (the table says the max loaded trailer weight is 20,000 with and 20,000 without) but I wouldn't go anywhere without the sway reduction provided by my trusty Equalizer.
(I know its more truck than I need, but there is a 5er somewhere out there in my future)
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Old 01-14-2021, 10:26 AM   #48
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Price etrailers.com to compare prices before making final decision. My 5th wheel was 50% less than RV dealer.
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