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Old 04-10-2020, 03:35 PM   #21
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I'm a little surprised that no one mentioned pure dish soap for sealing leaks in tires. With the wheel still on the vehicle, I remove the valve stem, let the tire deflate, put a short plastic (or rubber) hose with a funnel on end over the valve stem, fill the funnel with liquid dish soap, (no preference but I use Palmolive) and slowly jack the vehicle back up. The vacuum effect pulls the dish soap into the tire. Depending on the size I would use anywhere from 6 to 12 oz per tire. Then reinstall the valve stem, inflate the tire and go for a ride. This distributes the liquid soap around the inside and will seal any small leaks. I've had very good luck with this on a number of vehicles. Of course, this is after checking for nails, leaky stems, etc first.
You must live in a warm climate.

If one were to add 6-12 ox of ANY liquid to the inside of a tire and lived in an area where it freezes, they'd probably shake the rear view mirror off the windshield. At least until that frozen puddle of liquid thawed out.

As long as the liquid doesn't freeze it will distribute itself around the inside of the tire once the vehicle is moving. It will even help "balance" the tire wheel. In fact companies for as long as I worked in the industry have been selling liquid balance/sealer compounds. Most of them are from the South where their products work OK (?). In North Dakota, Alaska, etc ------ not so much.
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Old 04-10-2020, 03:48 PM   #22
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You must live in a warm climate.

If one were to add 6-12 ox of ANY liquid to the inside of a tire and lived in an area where it freezes, they'd probably shake the rear view mirror off the windshield. At least until that frozen puddle of liquid thawed out.

As long as the liquid doesn't freeze it will distribute itself around the inside of the tire once the vehicle is moving. It will even help "balance" the tire wheel. In fact companies for as long as I worked in the industry have been selling liquid balance/sealer compounds. Most of them are from the South where their products work OK (?). In North Dakota, Alaska, etc ------ not so much.

I'm in Rhode Island where it does get cold, but I don't do this type of project in the winter. If it's 40 degrees of above, never a problem, as long as you don't put it in tire and just let it sit.
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Old 04-10-2020, 03:50 PM   #23
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I'm in Rhode Island where it does get cold, but I don't do this type of project in the winter. If it's 40 degrees of above, never a problem, as long as you don't put it in tire and just let it sit.

That much liquid will always end up at the bottom of a tire after you park it for a while. Just like it settles to the bottom of the bottle after you've poured some out and let it sit.
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Old 04-10-2020, 04:03 PM   #24
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That much liquid will always end up at the bottom of a tire after you park it for a while. Just like it settles to the bottom of the bottle after you've poured some out and let it sit.
Maybe. But like I said, I've never had a problem, and it has sealed a number of leaks for me.
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Old 04-10-2020, 04:51 PM   #25
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I’m not doing anything to brand new tires that I paid the tire shop for both the tires and installation for, they need to get it figured out and fix it right, not just make it work.

1 day down and I’m happy to say what they did yesterday didn’t make it worse, tires still have air and that uglydulation, or what ever they called it, hasn’t exploded at highway speed and killed anyone. 13 more days to see if polishing the inside of the rim fixed the air leak or not.
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Old 04-10-2020, 05:06 PM   #26
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Maybe. But like I said, I've never had a problem, and it has sealed a number of leaks for me.
If you're happy fine by me.

On my tires, if I have a leak (meaning it might be losing air for any reason) I want it fixed properly. That usually means some time under water and then dismounting tire from the wheel if it isn't just a valve core.

A proper repair will allow the tire to be use trouble free through the life of the tread, assuming no future punctures.

I typically pay up to $200 for each new tire and the dealer that sells them to me fixes them for free if I need. At the cost of those tires I don't wish to rely on anything other than the PROPER repair.

As for bead leaks, the rim should have been cleaned before the new tire was installed. The tire should have been properly installed so the tire machine didn't take a bite out of the bead. If any bead leakage is found on what appears to be a good wheel and tire, there is a product specifically made for this called "Bead Seal". It's painted on wheel bead mating surface and the tire re-mounted. Kind of like a "caulking compound" for tire beads.
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Old 04-10-2020, 05:57 PM   #27
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Iím not doing anything to brand new tires that I paid the tire shop for both the tires and installation for, they need to get it figured out and fix it right, not just make it work.

1 day down and Iím happy to say what they did yesterday didnít make it worse, tires still have air and that uglydulation, or what ever they called it, hasnít exploded at highway speed and killed anyone. 13 more days to see if polishing the inside of the rim fixed the air leak or not.
With the amount of air you claim you were losing, a decent tire shop should have determined where it was leaking from.
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Old 04-10-2020, 07:02 PM   #28
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With the amount of air you claim you were losing, a decent tire shop should have determined where it was leaking from.
Youíd think, but I actually watched them 2 separate times drop the entire tires and wheels into their water tank and no bubbles.

I actually have fluorescent dye that we put into refrigeration systems and then go over the system with a UV light to find leaks. If its still leaking in 13 days Iíll probably have to put dye in to see exactly where its coming from.

I have this slick little tool that will actually allow me to attach the hose for my gauges/charging hose and remove the valve core with, in this case the tire, with it still fully inflated and inject the dye in easily. The only flaw in it is the dye ends up all over the valve so if the valve is whatís leaking you canít tell because it will have the dye on it from filling it.

https://www.grainger.com/mobile/product/YELLOW-JACKET-Vacuum-Charge-and-Core-Removal-38D862

Iíll let them try to figure it out their tire expert ways before we step into me training them on how to find leaks the refrigeration tech way lol.
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Old 04-11-2020, 12:31 PM   #29
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Youíd think, but I actually watched them 2 separate times drop the entire tires and wheels into their water tank and no bubbles.

I actually have fluorescent dye that we put into refrigeration systems and then go over the system with a UV light to find leaks. If its still leaking in 13 days Iíll probably have to put dye in to see exactly where its coming from.

I have this slick little tool that will actually allow me to attach the hose for my gauges/charging hose and remove the valve core with, in this case the tire, with it still fully inflated and inject the dye in easily. The only flaw in it is the dye ends up all over the valve so if the valve is whatís leaking you canít tell because it will have the dye on it from filling it.

https://www.grainger.com/mobile/prod...Removal-38D862

Iíll let them try to figure it out their tire expert ways before we step into me training them on how to find leaks the refrigeration tech way lol.

I wouldn't bother with the dye. It works in refrigeration systems because oil travels with the refrigerant and the dye mixes with the oil. The oil and dye are leaking from any "hole" so you can detect with UV light.

In a tire there is no oil circulating so you'll just end up with a splatter of dye opposite the valve stem inside but any bead leaks or pinholes in the tire won't get any of the dye to leak.

Different dynamics in tires than in refrigeration systems.

If you suspect bead leakage which can be quite common, take tire off vehicle and lay it on side. Pour a solution of water/dish detergent in the valley formed by rim and tire sidewall. Go have a beer or two, watch a movie, whatever, then come back later and look for bubbles. If there's a leak you'll see either one or two large bubbles or a small mound of foam. If nothing, repeat with tire lying on other side.

Detecting slow leaks at a tire shop is often a problem. They can be slow and it's not always possible to have an employee stand there looking for a bubble that may only show up every 10 minutes or so.

You can also find that puncturing objects are so small they aren't readily visible from the outside and the tire needs to be dismounted for inside inspection. A lot of our repairmen would wipe the inside of the tire with a shop rag in order to find things like staples that were hard to see.

Whenever someone the neighborhood gets a new roof, staples show up in tires frequently. Seems like roofers in the 90's just loved staples and those roofs are being replaced regularly in my neighborhood. I found dozens in my yard and driveway after getting my roof re-done. Luckily none ended up in my tires.
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