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Old 10-21-2021, 09:25 PM   #1
RAR
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Need new brakes

I have a 2018 Ram 2500 with the Cummins diesel and need to change the brakes. Our TT is a Ultra Lite 2906RS with a Iíve of 7981 lbs
Gross 9700lbs. Only have 36000 miles on the truck but the brakes are starting to squeak. Have rued blowing out with air and using brake clean to remove any dirt etc. but still have the squeak. I have seen on a couple Ram forums where guys have gone to EBC brakes some just changing pads others going with vented rotors and new pads. EBCís our pricey but donít mind paying if the are that much better. Just wondering what anybody else has done weather a Ram, Chevy or Ford. Thanks for any response.
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Old 10-22-2021, 06:39 AM   #2
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Powerstop Z36 on my F350 Powerstroke.

Started using them maybe 10 years ago so I'm familiar with the product and currently have them on multiple vehicles. I put a set on my truck maybe 3 years ago.. very happy. Probably have 50k on them right now.
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Old 10-22-2021, 06:48 AM   #3
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Too many shops warp rotors for me to put extra money into a rotor.
In the past 25 years I bet I had at least 12 rotors warped.
Dodge dealers, Ford dealers, independents.
I found a local guy who did a great job and then he retired.
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Old 10-22-2021, 06:49 AM   #4
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Hmm. I have a '16 Ram 2500, pulled my 2906ws the last 6 years and truck is at 100k miles. Original brakes are about half worn when I last looked, a few months ago.
It was my daily driver till retirement last year. Are you sure the pads and discs are worn out or could there be something else going on?
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Old 10-22-2021, 07:58 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1100mike View Post
Hmm. I have a '16 Ram 2500, pulled my 2906ws the last 6 years and truck is at 100k miles. Original brakes are about half worn when I last looked, a few months ago.
It was my daily driver till retirement last year. Are you sure the pads and discs are worn out or could there be something else going on?


Thanks guys I did see the power stop brakes which are quite a bit cheaper. Mike the pads and rotors arenít worn out the just squeak real bad.
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Old 10-22-2021, 09:05 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Tabasco_Joe View Post
Too many shops warp rotors for me to put extra money into a rotor.
In the past 25 years I bet I had at least 12 rotors warped.
Dodge dealers, Ford dealers, independents.
I found a local guy who did a great job and then he retired.
The shops aren't really "warping" the rotors but rather machining them improperly. In many cases the lathes they use are merely old drum brake lathes adapted for rotors. This is the case even for many of the top quality, most popular, lathes on the market.

Drums are less critical for improper mounting on the arbor as well as it being less critical that the arbor itself have ZERO runout.

Back in the 90's the car and equipment manufacturers realized that the absolutely best way to assure a rotor was properly machined was to turn it on the vehicle. Several great "On Car Rotor Lathes" were introduced but as usual the shops thought they were too expensive and stuck with their 1950's designed off car brake lathes.

Eventually car manufacturers got fed up with their franchised dealer's reluctance to modernize so they just made it a condition of their franchise by establishing minimum equipment standards for their dealers.

Because the on-car rotor lathe uses the same bearings the vehicle runs on, and turns it with an external motor, the rotor is running as true on it's "centers" as possible. Far different than a rotor mounted with cones that have been dropped, used for press "accessories", and on an arbor that can have several thousandths of run-out.

If looking for a proper brake job and wanting the rotors just turned (providing they meet the criteria for turning) insist on having the rotors turned ON THE VEHICLE. Otherwise just replace the rotors.

As for "Pads", the OEM Pads are usually the best for stopping and long life regardless of aftermarket marketer's claims.

BTW, if replacing rotors DO NOT let them be turned by a shop. It's been proven years ago that rotors do no "warp in shipment, yada, yada, yada". The mechanics that claim proof they do from their lathes showing uneven cutting on either side is actually proof that their setup is faulty and/or the arbor is either bent or improperly indexed in their machine. (the factory that built the machine checked the arbor runout than cut small witness marks in spindle and arbor before shipment. Very few mechanics ever check to see if witness marks match or have replaced a damaged arbor with new and haven't bothered to check "indexing" with a dial indicator.)
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Old 10-22-2021, 09:15 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tabasco_Joe View Post
Too many shops warp rotors for me to put extra money into a rotor.
In the past 25 years I bet I had at least 12 rotors warped.
Dodge dealers, Ford dealers, independents.
I found a local guy who did a great job and then he retired.
The shops aren't really "warping" the rotors but rather machining them improperly. In many cases the lathes they use are merely old drum brake lathes adapted for rotors. This is the case even for many of the top quality, most popular, lathes on the market.

Drums are less critical for improper mounting on the arbor as well as it being critical that the arbor itself have ZERO runout.

Back in the 90's the car and equipment manufacturers realized that the absolutely best way to assure a rotor was properly machined was to turn it on the vehicle. Several great "On Car Rotor Lathes" were introduced but as usual the shops thought they were too expensive and stuck with their 1950's designed off car brake lathes.

Eventually car manufacturers got fed up with their franchised dealer's reluctance to modernize so they just made it a condition of their franchise by establishing minimum equipment standards for their dealers.

Because the on-car rotor lathe uses the same bearings the vehicle runs on, and turns it with an external motor, the rotor is running as true on it's "centers" as possible. Far different than a rotor mounted with cones that have been dropped, used for press "accessories", and on an arbor that can have several thousandths of run-out.

If looking for a proper brake job and wanting the rotors just turned (providing they meet the criteria for turning) insist on having the rotors turned ON THE VEHICLE. Otherwise just replace the rotors.

As for "Pads", the OEM Pads are usually the best for stopping and long life regardless of aftermarket marketer's claims.
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Old 10-22-2021, 09:24 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by RAR View Post
Thanks guys I did see the power stop brakes which are quite a bit cheaper. Mike the pads and rotors arenít worn out the just squeak real bad.
If rotors and pads aren't worn much, yet squeaking is an issue, this is usually caused by the pads moving in the calipers and the usual sound damping material between back of pad and caliper piston is compromised. Some pads use metal shims between pad/piston and others have an elastomeric coating that keeps the metal to metal contact from causing this noise.

Often all that's required is to remove caliper from rotor, pads from caliper, and reassemble. Clean the back of pads and face of piston(s) and reassemble with new shim/anti squeal material. It's also a good idea to lube the ends of the pads where they contact the caliper body with some anti-seize or other approved lube. The metal to metal contact is where the squeal is created and when disassembled you will note the shiny/polished contact points. Usually with lots of fine rust powder around it.
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Old 10-22-2021, 09:57 AM   #9
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I too put power stop pads on my 2012 2500 CTD. I had a leaky rear seal that soaked the LR brake, so needed to change them out when I redid the seals. The stock ones were still in great shape (other than now soaked in grease) I am pleased with the performance of the new pads. No noises during braking. I use my exhaust brake to do most of my slowing, so wear wise, the pads will last a very long time.
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Old 10-22-2021, 10:20 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mmartin_tdc View Post
I too put power stop pads on my 2012 2500 CTD. I had a leaky rear seal that soaked the LR brake, so needed to change them out when I redid the seals. The stock ones were still in great shape (other than now soaked in grease) I am pleased with the performance of the new pads. No noises during braking. I use my exhaust brake to do most of my slowing, so wear wise, the pads will last a very long time.


Did you go with there ceramic pad. I have read that you get less dust but the donít dissipate the heat as well.
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Old 10-22-2021, 10:22 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TitanMike View Post
If rotors and pads aren't worn much, yet squeaking is an issue, this is usually caused by the pads moving in the calipers and the usual sound damping material between back of pad and caliper piston is compromised. Some pads use metal shims between pad/piston and others have an elastomeric coating that keeps the metal to metal contact from causing this noise.



Often all that's required is to remove caliper from rotor, pads from caliper, and reassemble. Clean the back of pads and face of piston(s) and reassemble with new shim/anti squeal material. It's also a good idea to lube the ends of the pads where they contact the caliper body with some anti-seize or other approved lube. The metal to metal contact is where the squeal is created and when disassembled you will note the shiny/polished contact points. Usually with lots of fine rust powder around it.


Thanks Mike I will try cleaning them first.
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Old 10-22-2021, 10:49 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RAR View Post
Thanks Mike I will try cleaning them first.
If your pads don't have shims between steel backing plate and caliper piston some of this will help:



Just follow the instructions on the back of the tube.

*****

If the pads have shims on the back then use some of this:



The anti-seize also works great for lubing caliper retainer/slide bolts as well as the contact points at the ends of the shoes. If your caliper mounts have small metal pieces pressed onto the caliper mount, clean them well and put a thin coating of anti-seize on the surface. Don't over-do, a thin coat does the job and too much just ends up where you don't want it to be.

Note: Even if your pads don't have shims on the back, the anti-seize will be needed for the caliber contact/slide points.

These are both available on Amazon as well as many Auto Parts Stores.
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Old 10-22-2021, 11:56 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by TitanMike View Post
If your pads don't have shims between steel backing plate and caliper piston some of this will help:



Just follow the instructions on the back of the tube.

*****

If the pads have shims on the back then use some of this:



The anti-seize also works great for lubing caliper retainer/slide bolts as well as the contact points at the ends of the shoes. If your caliper mounts have small metal pieces pressed onto the caliper mount, clean them well and put a thin coating of anti-seize on the surface. Don't over-do, a thin coat does the job and too much just ends up where you don't want it to be.

Note: Even if your pads don't have shims on the back, the anti-seize will be needed for the caliber contact/slide points.

These are both available on Amazon as well as many Auto Parts Stores.


Thank you
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