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Old 01-23-2021, 04:54 AM   #1
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Newbie: Need Veteran RVerís POV on Pairing TV to TT

I've always had a deep passion for the outdoors and tent-camping as a child and bachelor. But now with a young family (wife, toddler and 3 mo. old), I want to make some new family memories hitting the road and exploring all that we can.

Never owned a truck or trailer but I've done as much research as possible on both and am hoping the below setup would be okay ... would love to hear thoughts from veteran travelers. (FYI - #'s stated for TV comes from Ford's official 2021 Towing Guide documentation)


Travel Trailer
2021 Rockwood Ultra Lite 2706WS (32′ 10″)
UVW: 6,158
GVWR: 8,721
Pin/Hitch Weight (at 12.5% of GVWR): 1,090

Tow Vehicle
2021 F-150 XLT 3.5L Ecoboost (4◊4, 5.5′ bed) with max tow package
Curb Weight: 4,948
GVWR: 7,050
GCVWR: 19,400
Payload Capacity: 2,100
Towing Capacity: 13,900
My projected passenger and truck cargo weight = approx. 1,000 lb (includes estimated 100 lbs for WDH*)

* I intend to get a weight distribution hitch, not sure which one – I welcome any recommendations if folks have any given the above setup.

I did the calculations and I am 'within' limits of vehicle's stated capabilities, but would love the second, third, fourth. ... opinions; numbers say one thing but I don't know what real-world experience would tell me, hence this humble post seeking guidance from you all. Attached is a screen shot of #s and calculations in a table.

Am I asking for trouble with the above or would you feel reasonably confident driving this setup across breezy flat lands and high-altitude mountain ranges (i.e. Rocky Mtn. National Park)?

Thanks all!
Humble Will
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Old 01-23-2021, 05:24 AM   #2
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hard to say without knowing trim level and actual factory sticker payload capacity.
my 2014 3.5 Ecoboost SCREW XLT with the Max Tow package has payload of 1828lbs and the 7650lbs GVWR.
the hitch receiver may be maxed out on that trailer, when loaded for camping.
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Old 01-23-2021, 05:34 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by bikendan View Post
hard to say without knowing trim level and actual factory sticker payload capacity.
my 2014 3.5 Ecoboost SCREW XLT with the Max Tow package has payload of 1828lbs and the 7650lbs GVWR.
the hitch receiver may be maxed out on that trailer, when loaded for camping.
@Bikendan - If I may ask, could you elaborate on that last line about hitch receiver maxing out? What does that mean? Newbie here hasn't done much studying-up on hitch receiver considerations.
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Old 01-23-2021, 05:59 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by Kubo2021 View Post
@Bikendan - If I may ask, could you elaborate on that last line about hitch receiver maxing out? What does that mean? Newbie here hasn't done much studying-up on hitch receiver considerations.
The hitch receiver has its own max tongue weight rating. The max of any current F150 is 1320lbs, which is specific to the receiver, NOT the truck.
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Old 01-23-2021, 06:27 AM   #5
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Good job on doing your homework. I would look into F250 as well as you are bumping up to max payload with 150. As you kids grow you may be taking more stuff and the extra payload would be nice. Also if you decide to upgrade to a larger TT or may a mid profile 5th wheel you already have the TV. You may also appreciate the heavier suspension as your Rockwood is + 30í.
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Old 01-23-2021, 01:41 PM   #6
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Good job so far Will. After 20 years of RVing and 70 years (that's right) of camping I'll offer this. You can never have too much truck We live in the Canadian prairies but we spend a lot of time in Montana, Colorado, Idaho, Utah and Wyoming. The other folks have given you good advice and you just might be happy with what you have spec'd out. When we bought that Mini Lite 2502KS in our signature we had a Silverado 1500, 5.3L with the tow package. I spent one horrible season looking at my tachometer sitting at 4000+ RPM and the transmission shifting non-stop and said 'I can't do this and enjoy the ride.' We now have a 2500 Diesel and I can relax. Let's go way back to 2007 and we had a 27' Sunset Trail and another 2500 Diesel and it was a good combination but the trailer left a lot to be desired quality wise and we went to the other extreme and bought a 30' Citation 5th wheel with a 10500 dry weight and a gross of 12500 (round numbers). The 2500 hundred moved it forward just fine but I never want to experience the heart stopping thrill of having my trailer push me down a hill coming to a curve at the bottom again. (sure I could have stopped but what do you do then, sit there forever) We then traded in that 2500 Diesel with 4500 miles on it on a 3500 Dually. Now I had enough rubber on the road to handle the weight. 60,000 miles later we moved into the 40' Motorhome and that's a whole other story. Those are some real life experiences for you, you're welcome. Paul
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Old 01-23-2021, 01:57 PM   #7
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We have a 2015 3.5 F150 with max tow and our trailer is about a 1,000#'s lighter than what you are looking at. We have no problem towing in the mountains here on the east coast, but are close to the payload limits. The big issue we have with our 32' length is when the wind picks up. Anything more than 15-20 mph and any sort of big gusts turn the drive into a scary proposition.
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Old 01-23-2021, 02:09 PM   #8
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Welcome, and I would also agree with 2Plus1. I too have had both the 1500 and now the 2500. But I do congratulate you on doing the research and asking questions. We often read where the tow vehicle is a mismatch for the TT and this can be a very costly mistake. I am very pleased with our "2500" and in fact, have not needed to install my WDH.

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Old 01-23-2021, 02:20 PM   #9
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Here's my 2 centavos...

In the ten years or so I've followed this forum, I don't think I have seen the post where someone lamented having too much truck for their trailer.
When we went looking for our first TV, a pushy sales guy steered us away from a capable 1/2 ton to a 3/4 Cummins Ram
We got this outfit for not much more because it had sat for a year and was a plain jane (Tradesman).
Only time a pushy sales guy did me a favor. Drove that sucker coast to coast and border to border for it's entire warranty term, then sold it for 10K less than we paid.
It gave me great confidence knowing our TV weighed about what our TT weighed. No tail wagging the dog experience.
Crossed the Rockies many times... never any white knuckles.
Done with the long range stuff now but still have a 3/4 gasser for close by camping.
Good luck with your search and Happy Camping to you.
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Old 01-23-2021, 03:52 PM   #10
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Tow

If I were starting out again, I would go w/ a F-250 gas w/3.73 rear gears from the start. It will tow better w/ the length trailer you are looking at. This is due to a heavier frame, better brakes more truck weight. When you price trucks at the dealer, you may find you can get a nicely equipped for what you pay for a Max-Tow, max-payload F-150. In my area of North TX., they are less and more F-250s on the lots to choice from. It will also give you the ability to upgrade to 5 th. wheel down the road w/o buying another truck.
If you are considering staying in older national parks, I would suggest looking at trailers less than 30'. Someone had an article on here about trailers over 30', it cut available sites in half. We found this to be very true. Also if you are new to it, it will be easier on you and gives flexibility to learn what your favorite style of camping will be.
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Old 01-23-2021, 04:00 PM   #11
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Tow vehicle

I have a 33í Salem and I had a F150 eco boost that labored when climbing long grades and merging into traffic. I now pull with F250 6.7 diesel and love the muscle. I use a BlueOx hitch and sway system.
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Old 01-24-2021, 09:40 AM   #12
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First, welcome to the forum from near Toronto.

Since the numbers you're quoting are theoretical numbers, you'll need to search your local dealers and find out what the door stickers say for payload. When towing a camper, that's the critical spec - that'll be the first spec you exceed. It's not as much about "pulling" the trailer's weight as it is about "carrying" it's tongue weight.

The Rockwood you're looking at is a very nice bunkhouse layout. We are on our 3rd Rockwoood so you know I think they make a good product - not perfect but definitely above average quality. The only thing I see it lacking is countertop space.

Edit: I was going to suggest a 3/4 ton since that Rockwood is almost 33' long, but I noticed you are asking about towing in the mountains so I'd suggest you look at a 1 ton SRW diesel. The Diesel engine robs a good chunk of payload from the 3/4 ton so I always suggest skipping a 3/4 ton if you want/need the Diesel engine. That will future-proof your investment, too.

Good luck and you're wise to come here looking for advice BEFORE buying anything!
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Old 01-24-2021, 09:54 AM   #13
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I've always had a deep passion for the outdoors and tent-camping
If so why the travel trailer -- sleep in a box?

There are wonderful hybrids which preserve the tenting feel as well as provide the benefits of the box with a full galley, dinette, bathroom, etc. My Roo 23SS is 30ft long opened but about 20ft closed -- and is roughly 6000 pounds which I can tow with my Expedition (with HD Tow) so I'm not stuck with a pickup for a daily driver. Family fits very well in the Expedition. I have two queen beds and there are 3-bed versions.

Just an alternate. Every time we go to the RV show and I look at full box trailers I get the "look" from SHMBO -- you know that look! She sleeps better under canvas than at home.

-- Chuck
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Old 01-24-2021, 10:40 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kubo2021 View Post
I've always had a deep passion for the outdoors and tent-camping as a child and bachelor. But now with a young family (wife, toddler and 3 mo. old), I want to make some new family memories hitting the road and exploring all that we can.

Never owned a truck or trailer but I've done as much research as possible on both and am hoping the below setup would be okay ... would love to hear thoughts from veteran travelers. (FYI - #'s stated for TV comes from Ford's official 2021 Towing Guide documentation)


Travel Trailer
2021 Rockwood Ultra Lite 2706WS (32′ 10″)
UVW: 6,158
GVWR: 8,721
Pin/Hitch Weight (at 12.5% of GVWR): 1,090

Tow Vehicle
2021 F-150 XLT 3.5L Ecoboost (4◊4, 5.5′ bed) with max tow package
Curb Weight: 4,948
GVWR: 7,050
GCVWR: 19,400
Payload Capacity: 2,100
Towing Capacity: 13,900
My projected passenger and truck cargo weight = approx. 1,000 lb (includes estimated 100 lbs for WDH*)

* I intend to get a weight distribution hitch, not sure which one – I welcome any recommendations if folks have any given the above setup.

I did the calculations and I am 'within' limits of vehicle's stated capabilities, but would love the second, third, fourth. ... opinions; numbers say one thing but I don't know what real-world experience would tell me, hence this humble post seeking guidance from you all. Attached is a screen shot of #s and calculations in a table.

Am I asking for trouble with the above or would you feel reasonably confident driving this setup across breezy flat lands and high-altitude mountain ranges (i.e. Rocky Mtn. National Park)?

Thanks all!
Humble Will
That F-150 will tow your trailer with no problemsat all. None.

People will tell you, "Get a Super Duty, Get a 2500, Get a Peterbilt or a Kenworth"! Horse feathers..

For one thing, the 6.2L Gasser Ford V8 makes a lot less power than your EcoBoost and so does the gasser in the cheby and the Ram. So, 'splain that to me, Lucy.

I'd put a rear sway bar on it if I were you. Get a friend to help. It's not difficult but an extra pair of hands helps (not the DW).

Another thing to consider, while those gasser HDs and the Super Duty make okay torque (at best) they don't make it until they reach much higher RPM.

That matters. If you need to put your foot in it, it's screaming along at 4,200 RPM or more) sounding like it's about to shake itself apart. While your EcoBoost is making maximum torque at 3,100 RPM. Not only is the power band a lot lower, but it makes more torque than any of the Sooper-Duper HD gassers.

Spare me.

Now..... There is NO doubt that a SD/HD truck is better for towing in general. No doubt at all. There's no denying it. But the hassle of owning it; garaging it, maintaining it, driving it and the poor ride quality plus the fact used HD/SD gassers are next to worthless.....

Put a sway bar on it and Happy Camping. Forget the pedants of the Weight Police. The bane of every RV Board
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Old 01-24-2021, 11:19 AM   #15
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The Ford towing guide is good info but limited in value on making final towing decisions.
First, you appear to quoting Maximum possible towing capacities which only apply to option limited vehicles. It doesn’t even differentiate between a bare bones XL and a limited.
Second, towing capacities charted are based on GCWR minus empty truck curb weight (OK, gas tank full, one 150# occupant/driver). So, the big number towing capacity includes or eats up the truck’s entire Payload capacity. So whatever you take in the truck lowers that charted capacity. Example: with my signature truck, it charts 9,100# towing capacity. Once I subtract my daily driving load changes from factory, I’m down to 8710# left from the GCWR. That 390# also drops the truck payload capacity that much. Last camp, I towed with a full load of FW. That put TT tongue weight at about 695#, factory tongue weight 377#. Bottom line, for me and my truck, I consider an 8,000# tow load to Max out my truck to allow for a camping load in the truck bed.
The only way (weigh you can know the truck GVWR is to look at the federal white door sticker OR GVWR (IF) listed on the window sticker. Only way to know payload capacity for a specific truck without actually weighing it is to read it on the yellow Load capacity door sticker.
A unicorn F150 with Max tow and Heavy Duty Payload Package would probably work for you, was only available in mid level XLT and below trims, but you’re into F250 pricing anyways. Other than with that unicorn, you either need a bigger truck or a smaller trailer, IMO.
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Old 01-24-2021, 11:37 PM   #16
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Pov on truck trailer pairing

Lots of differing points of view obviously. A fundamental truth of towing is that you can't have too much truck. Another is that when you get home, if you are like 90% of real people, you have to drive your truck to work and back. That Cummins powered Kenworth some people would have you buy will be no joy when you pull into the mall parking spaces.
That said, IMHO, you have outlined a substantial truck. I have one....it will pull A LOT. However, you also need to stop it and control it in angry Nebraska cross winds. And while properly set with a WDH CAN be a safe and comfortable ride across the country, the closer you get to those mythical "published towing limits", the tighter you will be gripping the wheel.
So, where we part company is the choice of TT. In my experience, we spend very little time inside "the box" as another posted coined it. We eat at the picnic table or fireside and go inside to sleep. 33 ft of TT is a lot of box to pull around the country just to be a glorified tent.
I believe that unless you are interested in stepping up to the 3/4 ton vehicles, you ought to reconsider your trailer choice. Lots of options @ less than 30 ft and under 8K lbs.
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Old 01-25-2021, 12:48 PM   #17
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Lots of differing points of view obviously. A fundamental truth of towing is that you can't have too much truck. Another is that when you get home, if you are like 90% of real people, you have to drive your truck to work and back. That Cummins powered Kenworth some people would have you buy will be no joy when you pull into the mall parking spaces.
That said, IMHO, you have outlined a substantial truck. I have one....it will pull A LOT. However, you also need to stop it and control it in angry Nebraska cross winds. And while properly set with a WDH CAN be a safe and comfortable ride across the country, the closer you get to those mythical "published towing limits", the tighter you will be gripping the wheel.
So, where we part company is the choice of TT. In my experience, we spend very little time inside "the box" as another posted coined it. We eat at the picnic table or fireside and go inside to sleep. 33 ft of TT is a lot of box to pull around the country just to be a glorified tent.
I believe that unless you are interested in stepping up to the 3/4 ton vehicles, you ought to reconsider your trailer choice. Lots of options @ less than 30 ft and under 8K lbs.
Thereís a lot of sense to this post
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Old 01-25-2021, 01:14 PM   #18
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[QUOTE=Tundra 2014;2485674]If I were starting out again, I would go w/ a F-250......

I second this. I have a 2019 Dodge 1500 with max tow and other personal upgrades to help the towing ride. Even though you are within specs, the closer to those specs you get the more you'll feel them. Passing semi's on the highways or driving through the planes where the side wind is tough. The truck will handle it, but you'll be a little nervous while driving.

I have the Blue OX weight distribution hitch which works wonders. I however miss the straight bar models like the equalizer or similar that I used on my smaller RV's. My next truck which will happen sooner than planned with be the 2500, F-250 or similar model. Towing capacity is easy to come by, the payload however has always been the hidden important aspect to towing trailers with higher tongue weights.

And yes, as many have mentioned, you might have to drive the truck on a daily basis to commute, getting a truck with a gas mileage of 13-15 MPH is hard to deal with unless you have a budget for it. I use to own a 2017 ford f-150 eco boost. Loved the truck and loved the gas mileage when not towing. Not sure if they make an F-250 like that, but do your research. I have not researched the 2021 F-150 but I know Ford is doing big things with their trucks.

I'm not going to tell you which truck to buy, but look at the true numbers for the actual hands on truck you are getting. Payload according to door sticker, compare gas mileage, and max towing capacity. you might find that getting an f-250, with just a standard tow package will give you comparative gas mileage, a better payoad and towing capacity and for about the same price.
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Old 01-25-2021, 01:42 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by Chuck_S View Post
If so why the travel trailer -- sleep in a box?

There are wonderful hybrids which preserve the tenting feel as well as provide the benefits of the box with a full galley, dinette, bathroom, etc. My Roo 23SS is 30ft long opened but about 20ft closed -- and is roughly 6000 pounds which I can tow with my Expedition (with HD Tow) so I'm not stuck with a pickup for a daily driver. Family fits very well in the Expedition. I have two queen beds and there are 3-bed versions.

Just an alternate. Every time we go to the RV show and I look at full box trailers I get the "look" from SHMBO -- you know that look! She sleeps better under canvas than at home.

-- Chuck
I will second the suggestion to look at hybrids. We started out in tents, then a popup, now a hybrid. We like the canvas ends. We basically only sleep inside and if the weather is rainy and cold we will hang out inside. Otherwise we spend all of our time outside. The 3 bunk models are pretty roomy. And, the box length is all living space. No fixed beds to take up room.

The biggest drawback of hybrids is packing up when wet. You will have to set up again to let the canvas dry out after the trip. That will happen a few times each year. Other than that, I love teh hybrid.
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Old 01-25-2021, 02:03 PM   #20
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For Muddauber.....Unfortunately, I deliver new Ford trucks as a part time gig and can assure you that neither gas nor diesel 250s will get within 5 MPG of a 150 EB...even on a good day and regardless of final drive gearing. Plus will cost you about the same with less amenities. So if mileage is a big consideration, the 150 wins....if it's bulk, the 250 wins.

The hybrid is a good choice....so long as your wife is ok with being in outback Montana amidst piles of bear poop sleeping inside a tent essentially. Not a battle I wanted lose.....er, I mean fight, so I went for a hard sided Hyper-Light.
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