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Old 10-01-2019, 01:50 AM   #1
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Opinions wanted Mitsubishi Outlander towing

Hello everyone. I’m looking to get a trailer my Mitsubishi Outlander could tow. I’ve been told by several dealers and manufacturers that I’m in the clear but I still have doubt. My suv is rated for 3,500lbs and the trailer we’re thinking of is a rockwood geo pro 19fbs so basically 3,100lbs. We wouldn’t tow with our tanks full nor do we bring any heavy gear with us but it’s still quite heavy. One dealer told us if we added a Prodigy RF break controller and anti sway bars we would be a little safer.

I see so many people recommend much higher tow ratings for such a small trailer so I’m self conscious this won’t be ok. I have experience towing long distance and am a slow and safe driver but I don’t want to put anyone in danger if it’s that serious.

My father also has a dualie ram something rather that I could tow it with when need be but I’d greatly prefer to use my suv

Thank you for any and all feedback and sorry if this is a really redundant question
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Old 10-01-2019, 04:25 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by Finkployd View Post
Hello everyone. I’m looking to get a trailer my Mitsubishi Outlander could tow. I’ve been told by several dealers and manufacturers that I’m in the clear but I still have doubt. My suv is rated for 3,500lbs and the trailer we’re thinking of is a rockwood geo pro 19fbs so basically 3,100lbs. We wouldn’t tow with our tanks full nor do we bring any heavy gear with us but it’s still quite heavy. One dealer told us if we added a Prodigy RF break controller and anti sway bars we would be a little safer.

I see so many people recommend much higher tow ratings for such a small trailer so I’m self conscious this won’t be ok. I have experience towing long distance and am a slow and safe driver but I don’t want to put anyone in danger if it’s that serious.

My father also has a dualie ram something rather that I could tow it with when need be but I’d greatly prefer to use my suv

Thank you for any and all feedback and sorry if this is a really redundant question
forget that trailer. the fictional "dry" tongue weight already exceeds your Outlander's max of 350lbs, before adding the weights of battery, factory options, water and trailer cargo.
you need a smaller trailer or a bigger TV.

and your dealer is an idiot. PLEASE don't believe RV salespeople. you're making 2 big newbie mistakes.
Believing bogus "dry" weights and RV salespeople.
Also, i believe that your Outlander is more of a CUV, than a SUV.
i consider a SUV to be a Tahoe, Suburban, Expedition, Armada or Sequoia. anything smaller is a CUV.
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Old 10-01-2019, 05:47 AM   #3
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Thank you for your response! I am worried we might be getting the tongue weights confused for the outlander and the outlander sport. My Mitsubishi dealer told me my maximum tongue weight would be 600lbs not 350lbs. I’m not saying you’re wrong though. He could very well be a moron for all I know. If it is indeed 600lbs is it possible to tow without water safely? I eventually would like to get a Ford Expedition with a tow package but that’s another story. We also don’t bring a lot with us, it’s mainly a weekend getaway deal for us.


/edit

I’ve just got off work and checked my manual to see if it could help and it kind of did but I’m not sure I’m getting this right. It gives an equation to figure out your max tongue weight via the cargo capacity info panel inside the drivers side door. My panels says not to exceed 1157lbs between cargo and occupants. My husband and I weigh 250lbs and 200lbs and we have three 10lb dogs who would go in the middle seat behind us. This should mean 1157- 500lbs leaving us 675lbs before we add any cargo. If we do have anything we want to bring we could load it into the rear of the trailers pass through storage. But again, I’m not sure I’m correct in this thought process.
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Old 10-01-2019, 07:00 AM   #4
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You will not like towing with a vehicle that light.

You will be over on trailer weight.

Brakes too small. Engine too small. Tires too small. Too much wind resistance.

Back and forth to a nearby campground on a dry day maybe.

You need a tow rating of near #6,000.
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Old 10-01-2019, 07:23 AM   #5
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If you are dead set on towing with your Outlander you need to start looking at lighter TT's and pop ups. You will lose some amenities but will be safer on the road.
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Old 10-01-2019, 07:24 AM   #6
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Your logic is fine, however.

The trailer weight is as it leaves the factory.

No propane in tanks. No batteries. No weigh distributing hitch. No sway control.. nothing in the fridge or tanks or closets. No spare tire. Empty tanks. No firewood. No fuel in the tv.

Was the tow rating in accordance with SAE testing requirements? This trailer testing is a recent thing. The trailer is a low profile aerodynamic vehicle like a Corvette. No wind resistance like a big box. You will have a 180 sq ft sail in back to encourage sway. Not enough vehicle mass to counterbalance.

Placing weight in the back of the trailer only causes sway. Got to distribute weight carefully.

In wet weather the brakes will skid easily.

Costs nothing to try. You are not going to like it.

New Cars are not good to pull trailers.
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Old 10-01-2019, 07:30 AM   #7
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You will not like towing with a vehicle that light.

You will be over on trailer weight.

Brakes too small. Engine too small. Tires too small. Too much wind resistance.

Back and forth to a nearby campground on a dry day maybe.

You need a tow rating of near #6,000.
Yea i'm from Texas and would mostly use it in Texas/Southern states so not really any mountains but still hilly. If I did get a trailer I would get a break assist to help. I've read about some people towing 3,000lb trailers with their Outlanders and them saying it wasn't great gas mileage but not too bad on the swaying or stopping but I'm obviously here for opinions so thank you for input! When you say I won't like towing with a vehicle that light, do you mean we're going to risk our lives or I will have to go slow and be overly cautious?

I do have the option to tow with my fathers truck as well but it's not as ideal for us to have to swap cars for the weekend. I havn't bought the trailer yet, we were actually waiting until the Houston RV show next year to tour all our options but we want to make sure we actually KNOW what our options are before we get there and the 19fbs is a favorite of ours so far. If I did have to tow less, how much less do y'all think would be more manageable? Or should I just throw this whole outlander towing dream out the window


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Originally Posted by tomkatb View Post
Your logic is fine, however.

The trailer weight is as it leaves the factory.

No propane in tanks. No batteries. No weigh distributing hitch. No sway control.. nothing in the fridge or tanks or closets. No spare tire. Empty tanks. No firewood. No fuel in the tv.

Was the tow rating in accordance with SAE testing requirements? This trailer testing is a recent thing. The trailer is a low profile aerodynamic vehicle like a Corvette. No wind resistance like a big box. You will have a 180 sq ft sail in back to encourage sway. Not enough vehicle mass to counterbalance.

Placing weight in the back of the trailer only causes sway. Got to distribute weight carefully.

In wet weather the brakes will skid easily.

Costs nothing to try. You are not going to like it.

New Cars are not good to pull trailers.
I'm not sure if I'm right here either, but I was told it was 2,950lbs emtpy and 3,075 lbs with full propane and batteries (and I'm assuming the spare tire but i'm not for sure). Mine could even potentially be lighter because we wouldn't get one with an oven but we would get the off road package so perhaps not. But yes, this still leaves very little wiggle room and no capacity to tow with water. And as for how they acquired the tow rating I have no idea. I will have to do more research obviously but I'm glad to have had y'alls opinions on this idea. Thanks for the input everyone
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Old 10-01-2019, 07:44 AM   #8
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Yea i'm from Texas and would mostly use it in Texas/Southern states so not really any mountains but still hilly. If I did get a trailer I would get a break assist to help. I've read about some people towing 3,000lb trailers with their Outlanders and them saying it wasn't great gas mileage but not too bad on the swaying or stopping but I'm obviously here for opinions so thank you for input! When you say I won't like towing with a vehicle that light, do you mean we're going to risk our lives or I will have to go slow and be overly cautious?

I do have the option to tow with my fathers truck as well but it's not as ideal for us to have to swap cars for the weekend. I havn't bought the trailer yet, we were actually waiting until the Houston RV show next year to tour all our options but we want to make sure we actually KNOW what our options are before we get there and the 19fbs is a favorite of ours so far. If I did have to tow less, how much less do y'all think would be more manageable? Or should I just throw this whole outlander towing dream out the window
When he said you won't like it he meant you will likely be adjusting constantly to keep your TT and TV in your lane and at speed. It can be a white knuckle experience.(the tail will be wagging the dog!) If it is flat and calm and there are no semi's going by you'll be fine, but add wind, hills, and trucks blowing by and you have your work cut out for you.
Personally I would borrow the big Ram. You won't hardly know the TT is there.
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Old 10-01-2019, 08:10 AM   #9
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Towing capacity is like weight lifting,

Your max benchpress may be 200 pounds one time. Or you can bench 75 or 100 pounds 10 times.

Same with towing. “Max” is not the same as “sustained”

Look for something lighter. Driving “slow” only works on short trips to storage or for maintenance. Not for leisure.
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Old 10-01-2019, 08:12 AM   #10
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It is not just a calculation of the unused payload to find the max hitch weight for your vehicle.

From https://www.mitsubishicars.com/outla...owing-capacity :




Well, if the picture would display it would indicate that the Outlander models have a 150 max tongue weight, except the GT which has 350 max; IF they are equipped with the factory tow package.




You need to check the specs for your year and model. Even with the GT model I suspect that will be exceeded.


We towed a pop-up with various Ford Explorers. I used a Reese light duty weight distribution hitch (single bar) and Reese friction sway control. But even the new model Explorers are rated higher than the Outlander.


If your car does not have a brake controller, adding one would be a necessity.
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Old 10-01-2019, 08:34 AM   #11
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It is not just a calculation of the unused payload to find the max hitch weight for your vehicle.

From https://www.mitsubishicars.com/outla...owing-capacity :




Well, if the picture would display it would indicate that the Outlander models have a 150 max tongue weight, except the GT which has 350 max; IF they are equipped with the factory tow package.




You need to check the specs for your year and model. Even with the GT model I suspect that will be exceeded.


We towed a pop-up with various Ford Explorers. I used a Reese light duty weight distribution hitch (single bar) and Reese friction sway control. But even the new model Explorers are rated higher than the Outlander.


If your car does not have a brake controller, adding one would be a necessity.
I have a 2015 Outlander GT so it does not require the tow package to tow 3,500lbs and I had just gone with that equation because it was what the manual suggested. The mitsubishi dealer I spoke to said it could be done with break assists and anti sway bar but I can understand from the majority of opinions that it can be done but probably shouldn't. I will be pretty close to my limit and that will slowly break down my car the more I use my trailer. I'll have to see about trading in my car eventually but until then I'll either have to tow with my fathers RAM or skip it all together.

Thanks for the help again everyone.
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Old 10-01-2019, 09:50 AM   #12
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If i was to trade in for a 5,000lb rated Ford Explorer would that be adequate for this trailer or would I still need more power?
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Old 10-01-2019, 10:15 AM   #13
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I'm not sure if I'm right here either, but I was told it was 2,950lbs emtpy and 3,075 lbs with full propane and batteries (and I'm assuming the spare tire but i'm not for sure). Mine could even potentially be lighter because we wouldn't get one with an oven but we would get the off road package so perhaps not. But yes, this still leaves very little wiggle room and no capacity to tow with water. And as for how they acquired the tow rating I have no idea. I will have to do more research obviously but I'm glad to have had y'alls opinions on this idea. Thanks for the input everyone
As mentioned previously, ignore the dry weight (UVW) - it's a marketing ploy for suckers. Per the FR website (and last page of your brochure)

https://forestriverinc.com/rvs/trave...ro/G19FBS/3573
Unloaded Vehicle Weight: The typical weight of the unit as manufactured at the factory. It includes all weight at the unit’s axle(s) and tongue or pin and LP Gas. The UVW does not include cargo, fresh potable water, additional optional equipment or dealer installed accessories.

*Estimated Average based on standard build optional equipment
and
Cargo Carrying Capacity: The amount of weight available for fresh potable water, cargo, additional optional equipment and accessories. CCC is equal to GVWR minus UVW. Available CCC should accommodate fresh potable water (8.3 lbs per gallon). Before filling the fresh water tank, empty the black and gray tanks to provide for more cargo capacity.

**Estimated average based on standard build optional equipment
Also per the website, the UVW is 3075 lbs and CCC is 838 lbs, so the GVWR is 3913 lbs. Expect 10-15% on the tongue, so if in the middle, say 13%, the tongue will weigh around 508 lbs. Add 75 lbs for a WDH and you're at 583 lbs.

If you need to travel with your fresh water tank full (37 gal) it will use up about 307 lbs of your 838 lbs of CCC.
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Old 10-01-2019, 10:58 AM   #14
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With a brake controller and tow package I would say yes you will be better off with an explorer. Longer wheelbase and more vehicle weight.

Ive read many times you should stay under 75% of max towing capacity for long trips. Stopping, starting, climbing, ascending are all much safer with a better weight ratio..
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Old 10-01-2019, 11:33 AM   #15
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That trailer weighs 3,075 lbs dry. You'll be at the 3,900 lb GVWR so fast it will make your head spin.

So, you can make it that simple. This is too much trailer for the vehicle. Get a pop up or get a 1/2 ton truck (or SUV equivalent).
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Old 10-01-2019, 01:50 PM   #16
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I have a 2015 Outlander GT so it does not require the tow package to tow 3,500lbs and I had just gone with that equation because it was what the manual suggested. The mitsubishi dealer I spoke to said it could be done with break assists and anti sway bar.

Thanks for the help again everyone.
Every vehicle with the 3500lbs towing capacity, That ive ever seen, is REQUIRED to have the factory tow package to be rated to tow that amount. The factory tow package comes with a hitch Receiver and pre-wiring for brake controller, which this trailer will require.
Not sure if you're referring to a brake controller, with the term "brake assists" or a feature of your car.

Single axle trailers, like the Geo Pro, are tongue heavier, compared to an equivalent tandem axle trailer.
With a fictional "dry" tongue weight of 413lbs, the 19FBS could easily be over the Explorer's max of 500lbs, when loaded for camping.
This is why "dry" weights are not real world numbers. Once you add the weights of batteries, factory options, dealer add-ons, water and cargo, the actual tongue weight could easily be over 500lbs.

So if you really want this trailer, I would look at a mid-sized truck or larger SUV.
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Old 10-01-2019, 07:00 PM   #17
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Hello everyone. Iím looking to get a trailer my Mitsubishi Outlander could tow. Iíve been told by several dealers and manufacturers that Iím in the clear but I still have doubt. My suv is rated for 3,500lbs and the trailer weíre thinking of is a rockwood geo pro 19fbs so basically 3,100lbs. We wouldnít tow with our tanks full nor do we bring any heavy gear with us but itís still quite heavy. One dealer told us if we added a Prodigy RF break controller and anti sway bars we would be a little safer.

I see so many people recommend much higher tow ratings for such a small trailer so Iím self conscious this wonít be ok. I have experience towing long distance and am a slow and safe driver but I donít want to put anyone in danger if itís that serious.

My father also has a dualie ram something rather that I could tow it with when need be but Iíd greatly prefer to use my suv

Thank you for any and all feedback and sorry if this is a really redundant question
Look at the tab 320 camper it is under 2000 pounds and beautiful , a friend of mine just bought one and it's wonderful. I have a 19 fbs like you want and am sure you would not like towing it with your SUV.
https://youtu.be/cS1OC2n8Jrs
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Old 10-02-2019, 07:06 PM   #18
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While camping at the KOA in Parry Sound this summer I met a family who had a new Mitsu V6 Outlander and new Jayco SLX 19RB (similar weight to what you are considering). The trailer looked a bit too big for the Outlander so I asked him how it towed. He said when he towed it home from the dealer (without weight distribution) it was a "white knuckle" drive, and that he wouldn't go over 90KM/55 mph). He later got weight distribution added and towing to the park we were at(approx. 60 mile trip) he was a little more comfortable but wouldn't exceed 60 mph max.

He said if he had the chance to do it again he would have bought a more substantial TV or a smaller trailer. He sounded pretty disappointed as he couldn't afford to change out either as both were new vehicles bought on time.
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Old 10-02-2019, 07:43 PM   #19
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Look into the Rockwood A122S or sister model Flagstaff T12 RBST. Under 2500 lbs. with all required equipment (LP TANKS, Spare tire, Battery). 300 pound tongue weight. I love mine. Tows like a dream because of the low profile on the road. Over 200 nights of camping in the past 4 years.





Quite spacious inside.




https://forestriverinc.com/rvs/campi...pers/A122S/944
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