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Old 04-18-2019, 09:37 PM   #1
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Over inflate tires when towing?

Is it common practice to overinflate the tires of the tow vehicle when towing. I just noticed the other day when my tt was hooked up and it is still dry as we just got it out of storage my tires were looking pretty squishy. Their 1 yr old Michelin AT2’s that are properly inflated to normal everyday driving. Where would I find the max psi to fill the tires? I assume on the tire and I’m guessing this will help with control and gas mileage.
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Old 04-18-2019, 09:41 PM   #2
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Max PSI is on the sidewall of the tire.
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Old 04-18-2019, 09:45 PM   #3
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I have two stickers on the sides of the frame with the Max psi recommended for the trailer. Mine run 65 psi.
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Old 04-18-2019, 09:47 PM   #4
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I thought he was referring to his TV.
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Old 04-18-2019, 09:49 PM   #5
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I thought he was referring to his TV.
You may be right.
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Old 04-18-2019, 09:50 PM   #6
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Is it common practice to overinflate the tires when towing. I just noticed the other day when my tt was hooked up and it is still dry as we just got it out of storage my tires were looking pretty squishy. Their 1 yr old Michelin AT2ís that are properly inflated to normal everyday driving. Where would I find the max psi to fill the tires? I assume on the tire and Iím guessing this will help with control and gas mileage.
You talking about your truck or your trailer ??
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Old 04-18-2019, 09:51 PM   #7
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I'm thinking tow vehicle as well. You should have a sticker on your door frame or dig out your owners manual and go to the tire section for your recommended towing PSI. Check tire pressure in the morning before you drive it. You don't necessarily want to run the max PSI stated on the tire sidewall unless you like riding in a lumber wagon … go with your manual.
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Old 04-18-2019, 09:52 PM   #8
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The sidewalk of the tire gives the recommended pressure.
I check mine before each trip.
I drive a truck, I check my tires every time I get out of the truck!
In 6 years i have had three tires going down.
I immediately plugged them, no more problems.
That is 10 tires, and well over a half million miles.
My friends that don't check them regularly destroy about 4 tires in the same time and mileage!

It's all about keeping the right amount of air in them!
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Old 04-18-2019, 09:57 PM   #9
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I'm thinking tow vehicle as well. You should have a sticker on your door frame or dig out your owners manual and go to the tire section for your recommended towing PSI. Check tire pressure in the morning before you drive it. You don't necessarily want to run the max PSI stated on the tire sidewall unless you like riding in a lumber wagon Ö go with your manual.
Yes itís the truck tires Iím asking about.
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Old 04-18-2019, 09:59 PM   #10
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You talking about your truck or your trailer ??
The truck.
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Old 04-18-2019, 10:04 PM   #11
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If you don't have a owners manual … go online or call the service department at any dealer specific to your brand. I have a 2000 Ford dually … 60 PSI in front … 60 PSI in back towing. If I were to air them up to the 80 PSI max on the sidewall … It drives pretty squirrely and shakes out my fillings … Ha!
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Old 04-18-2019, 10:06 PM   #12
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The sidewall of the tire will have the max cold inflation pressure and the load rating. Some of us choose to run by this information rather than the door sticker.
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Old 04-18-2019, 10:07 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by jackhartjr View Post
The sidewalk of the tire gives the recommended pressure.
That is the pressure needed for max load, NOT the recommended pressure.

The recommended pressure is provided by the vehicle manufacturer on the tire info placard.
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Old 04-18-2019, 10:14 PM   #14
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Overinflation does not affect your load rating, the max load is listed on the sidewalk as max cold, followed by a PSI number, then the load limit should be after that.
The door sticker is what the manufacturer says makes the truck ride the best. I always use the max cold pressure when Iím towing. Then usually a couple pounds above the door sticker for everyday driving.
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Old 04-18-2019, 10:15 PM   #15
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Not being argumentative, but the pressure stated on the sidewall is MAX tire pressure not what is listed on your door jamb for your specific vehicle. For instance … my truck tires state 80 PSI max on the sidewall, but door jamb recommends 60 PSI. My car tires state 44 PSI max on the sidewall, but 34 PSI recommended on the door jamb. Many get confused here.
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Old 04-18-2019, 10:19 PM   #16
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Ok so my door sticker in my 2014 f150 screw says 35psi so Iím just asking if I go to 40 or 45psi while I tow will this be enough to knock out the squish while still providing an easy ride and itís well within the max psi ratings for these tires.
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Old 04-18-2019, 10:21 PM   #17
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Ah. What tires do you have and what does the sidewall say?
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Old 04-18-2019, 10:22 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by DieselDrax View Post
That is the pressure needed for max load, NOT the recommended pressure.

The recommended pressure is provided by the vehicle manufacturer on the tire info placard.
Since the door sticker is for a P rated tire and my tires are LT rated I choose to go with the tire manufacturers recommendation. I worked for a large government agency for 25 years and our fleet managers always recommended using the tire manufacturers psi label. After all it is that particular tire that is on the road.
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Old 04-18-2019, 10:28 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by Blackrock View Post
Since the door sticker is for a P rated tire and my tires are LT rated I choose to go with the tire manufacturers recommendation. I worked for a large government agency for 25 years and our fleet managers always recommended using the tire manufacturers psi label. After all it is that particular tire that is on the road.


Still, the PSI on the tire is the PSI for max load, not the recommended pressure for all loads. Try and dig up the inflation and load chart for your LT tires to find out the minimum pressure needed for whatever load you have on those tires.

I have P-metric tires with a 35psi recommendation on the truck sticker. If I upgraded to LT tires that said 51psi or 80psi there is no way I would just run those pressures. I would lose some teeth due to the harsh ride. Iíd seek out the inflation chart for the new tires and go from there to determine the correct pressure for my truck and tire combination.
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Old 04-18-2019, 10:50 PM   #20
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Still, the PSI on the tire is the PSI for max load, not the recommended pressure for all loads. Try and dig up the inflation and load chart for your LT tires to find out the minimum pressure needed for whatever load you have on those tires.

I have P-metric tires with a 35psi recommendation on the truck sticker. If I upgraded to LT tires that said 51psi or 80psi there is no way I would just run those pressures. I would lose some teeth due to the harsh ride. I’d seek out the inflation chart for the new tires and go from there to determine the correct pressure for my truck and tire combination.
No if you switch from P-metric to LT tires you need to air them up more than the door sticker. An LT tire run at P-metric pressure will actually have a lower load rating than the P-metric tire it replaced. Basically they will overheat at 35 PSI.

Just grabbing a random tire GENERAL GRABBER A/TX in P265/70R17 is rated 2,679 lbs at 44 PSI
the LT version LT265/70R17 is rated 3,195 lbs at 80 PSI but get this...at 35 PSI it is only rated 1890 lbs and at 45 PSI (more than the P-metric above) it is rated at 2255 lbs. That's over 1200 pounds total less capacity on the truck. That LT tire needs to be at 60 PSI before it beats the load ability of the P-metric at 44 PSI.

I personally wouldn't run any LT tire under 60 psi unless for off road use.

If the OP still has P-metric tires again, I personally would air them up to or close to the sidewall max while towing or hauling a heavy load. Ride on a modern F-150 will be just fine. I used to run my 2003 Cummins at 70-75 psi towing and it was just fine. It's no minivan, but...

https://static1.1.sqspcdn.com/static...+inflation.pdf
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