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Old 10-28-2020, 10:28 PM   #1
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Tacoma towing question

Looking at buying a Rockwood Geo Pro 19FD, wondering if my 2016 Tacoma TRD V6 4 x 4 can handle it? I live in Colorado so itíll be towing on hills, some of them pretty steep passes. I know gas mileage will suck but does anyone know if it can handle tongue wt 412lbs, 3050 UVW and CCC at 1250lbs? Thanks!
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Old 10-28-2020, 10:43 PM   #2
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As a fellow Colorado resident, I wouldn't. The Geo Pro 19fd is identical to my Micro Lite 19FD. I towed mine with a similar vehicle, a Nissan Frontier. After a few trips I knew I had to upgrade to a bigger truck. As you travel over mountainous terrain you will be taxing the Tacoma' drive train in a manner that will likely shorten its lifespan. Given my similar experience I would recommend a stronger tow vehicle.

Enjoy your new Geo Pro if you buy it.
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Old 10-28-2020, 10:49 PM   #3
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I'd like to add that the actual loaded-up ready-to-camp tongue weight of the Geo Pro will be over 500lbs (advertised mine is 390lbs but loaded up ready to go is actually 540lbs).
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Old 10-28-2020, 10:49 PM   #4
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That’s the kind of feedback I was looking for. I have a couple of lighter campers I’m checking out, will probably go with an R Pod, way lighter. Appreciate the help, thanks!
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Old 10-28-2020, 10:58 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AKay View Post
Thatís the kind of feedback I was looking for. I have a couple of lighter campers Iím checking out, will probably go with an R Pod, way lighter. Appreciate the help, thanks!
Check the drivers side door jamb of your Tacoma and you'll find a yellow Cargo or Payload sticker like the one I've attached below. The tongue weight of your trailer will reduce how much cargo you can carry in your truck. Anticipated actual tongue weight of a trailer that you are looking at can be calculated by taking the trailers Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) and multiplying that by .13%.

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Old 10-29-2020, 08:51 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AKay View Post
Thatís the kind of feedback I was looking for. I have a couple of lighter campers Iím checking out, will probably go with an R Pod, way lighter. Appreciate the help, thanks!
When you're trailer shopping, you need to be able to figure out what the trailer will weigh with all of your stuff. It adds up quick: bedding, cookware, food, drinks, clothes, electronics, tools, leveling gear, etc. There are also dealer (and factory) installed items that add weight, such as batteries and optional air conditioning.

Generally, either figure on 1,200 lbs added to the UVW or just use the GVWR, whichever is less. On single-axle trailers, you'll almost always be at GVWR.

Then, just take 12-14% of that figure for your tongue.

As an example, the trailer you posted will be 4,300 lbs loaded up and it will drop ~540 lbs onto the hitch.
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Old 10-30-2020, 12:19 AM   #7
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Good info!

Appreciate all the tips, Iím a tent camper-turned RVíer so new to this scene. Thinking Iíll get an R pod for a starter camper and upgrade later if I wanna spring for a Tundra. Love my Taco, though.
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