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Old 08-14-2018, 11:56 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by andymil View Post
I never thought about it but this makes sense. With the bed empty and one or two people in the cab, there has to be more weight on the front axle. Why would you need more pressure in the rear tires unless youíre loaded?

Iíve been running 60 and 65 like the door sticker says when not towing and bumping the rear tires up to 80 when towing. I may have to rethink that.
Tire wear should be used to determine if that is required.

For me, at the PSI on the door (35) I was wearing the edges of my tires when towing. This tells me that the pressure stated on the door was insufficient for the task. Yes,, I was still within the towing limits of the vehicle (although admittedly at the high end of capacity) and the tires.

I think the advice here is all over the place and varies greatly based on equipment, manufacturer, and the tires themselves.

If you're wearing faster in the center of the tire I would let some air out. If you're wearing faster on the edges or if you're noticing the tires rounding off you'll want to add some.
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Old 08-14-2018, 03:58 PM   #22
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I've stepped up to a 10ply on my TV. The factory installed Wrangler A/T's on my 2010 F150, recomended 40 or less for everyday driving(sorry, I've slept since I got rid of them) They had way to much squirm in them, unless the tires were aired up to their cold max pressure.
Especially when running a WDH, the proper inflation of the TV tires, is critical. The heavier the trailer, the more critical it becomes. With the WDH joining the TV and TT at the hip so to speak, if the trailer wiggles the TV will also. If the tires have to much flex, it's only worse.

The max on my new tires, is 80 or 85 psi, although I doubt I'll need that much. I can run them at 65 now if I think they need it. The Wranglers had a 55psi cold max limit.

The door sticker recommendations for tire pressure, is all about ride quality. When you put your TV to work, its all about load carrying.

Did you have high pressure valve stems installed when you changed to LRE tires? If not you should not be running any higher pressures than what is recommended on the pillar
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Old 08-14-2018, 04:08 PM   #23
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Did you have high pressure valve stems installed when you changed to LRE tires? If not you should not be running any higher pressures than what is recommended on the pillar

I'll take that under advisement. Nobody ever worried about special valve stems on my trucks that had the michelin LT's, at 80psi max. The place I get my tires mounted at, mount a lot of tires.

The door pillar recommendation, is just that. A recommendation. It isn't anything other then a suggestion for best ride and performance of the vehicle, for the particular tire the factory got the best buy on, to put on that vehicle.
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Old 08-14-2018, 04:42 PM   #24
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On my F-150, the pressure stated on the sticker inside my driver door is for the max weight rating for the axle. It is not ride quality! It is NOT the max PSI indicated on the side of the tire.
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Old 08-14-2018, 04:50 PM   #25
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everybody's got an opinion and all seem different . here's what i do . TV has 10 ply e load 80 psi tires . came from factory that way chevy 2500hd . when towing i run the rears at 80 psi . front since some weight is removed even with a WDH i run at 70 to 72 psi . when not towing i run the rears at 70 and front stays the same . i run a little higher in the rear when not towing cause i carry a lot of tools . if the bed was empty i would run 65 . tire wear is good and ride and handling is good . may be different for your TV
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Old 08-14-2018, 05:31 PM   #26
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Because we always load our vehicles to the max, before we go anywhere?

When they start adding a qualifier like "Don't you ever never not even in May or on Thanksgiving when hauling pumpkin pies, or when the vehicle is painted green, go over the federally mandated air pressure on the pillar in this vehicle, with these particular tires or we'll throw you in a dungeon", then I'll agree.

The tires indicate what load "they" can carry at the max pressure shown on the sidewall. "Its not" an invitation to overload the vehicle, just because the tire(s) can carry more then a particular max axle rating.
It does however give you the freedom to air them up, if they are showing indications of being underinflated for the load you decide to carry. Poor wear on the tread surface. To much sidewall flex.
Tire wear indications, are still the best indicator. Wearing poorly on the edges, and handling is less then stellar? Air them up a bit.
Wearing in the center, and a harsh ride? Reduce the pressure.

https://www.safercar.gov/Vehicle-Sho...al-Information

Note the number of times the word "Recommendation" is used. The engineers and related people at the manufacturers, want to sell vehicles. They design the vehicles with the broadest appeal to sell more. They know most people will never come close to overloading their vehicles, but they will want something that rides comfortably, and safely. The idea the door sticker recommendation, is the "perfect pressure", is absurd.

I'm sure there is an attorney behind every PSI of air in each tire, just waiting for an opportunity to void a warranty. Or not.
There is, a mechanic at the dealers, who will be diagnosing a problem of "The ride is to rough", or "The steering is sluggish and the tires look flat and are wearing funny", who will go to the door sticker, to decide whether improper pressure is the problem.

The recommended pressure, is a place to start. The max ratings of the vehicle and it's suspension, is the place to quit.

It's why God gave us thumbs, and the ability to reason. I'm sure there are plenty of days, He shakes his head.
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Old 08-14-2018, 07:52 PM   #27
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Should the tires pressure be different in my TV when I am towing vs. not towing?
YES your tire pressures will very likely be different towing all but a relatively small trailer. Weight distribution hitches aside, the pressures should be higher when towing, notably the rear axle of the tow vehicle.

A good place to start is to weigh the rig. Get a copy of the load chart for the tires and look up the recommended pressures for the load on each axle and set the pressures accordingly. Do this for both the tow vehicle and the trailer.
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Old 08-14-2018, 08:29 PM   #28
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More weight never requires less pressure and inflating to the pressures on the sidewall is not recommended. The "Tire and Loading Information" sticker is the pressure that the tires should be inflated to. I guess if you are not hauling then you COULD deflate but whatever you do is probably undocumented. Personally, I stay inflated to the recommended inflation on the sticker. There may be additional info in your vehicle owners manual and that should be adhered to also. The pressure on the sidewall of the tire is the MAXIMUM pressure for the tire on ANY vehicle. The pressure on the "Tire and Loading Information" sticker is the pressure for the specific vehicle.
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Old 08-14-2018, 08:35 PM   #29
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This is what Goodyear says about inflation

Goodyear recommends that tires be inflated to the vehicle manufacturer's recommendations as found on the Vehicle Tire Information Door Placard or the Vehicle's owners manual. The placard can be located on the door edge, doorpost, glove box, or fuel door. The recommended PSI should not be confused with the maximum cold inflation pressure that the tire is rated to hold, which is found on the sidewall.
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Old 08-14-2018, 08:35 PM   #30
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The correct way is to make a chalk mark across the entire tire and drive forward, making sure the entire tire tread is on the ground, which is easy to tell by the chalk mark.



Personally, I use a tire pressure per weight chart.
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Old 08-14-2018, 08:41 PM   #31
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See the rig in the sig.

Every tire on every axle is "E" rated. Every tire is at 70 pounds when towing.

When not towing the truck gets 60 psi to somewhat reduce the "Radio Flyer Wagon" effect. The TV tires are Michelins. They run real smooth but kinda stiff. Takes some getting used to. Some "E" tires will introduce vibration.
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Old 08-14-2018, 08:59 PM   #32
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I run MAX tire pressure when towing. (1100lb tongue weight) then back them down about 8-10lbs when I'm not towing.
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Old 08-15-2018, 02:54 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by katkt View Post
Because we always load our vehicles to the max, before we go anywhere?

When they start adding a qualifier like "Don't you ever never not even in May or on Thanksgiving when hauling pumpkin pies, or when the vehicle is painted green, go over the federally mandated air pressure on the pillar in this vehicle, with these particular tires or we'll throw you in a dungeon", then I'll agree.

The tires indicate what load "they" can carry at the max pressure shown on the sidewall. "Its not" an invitation to overload the vehicle, just because the tire(s) can carry more then a particular max axle rating.
It does however give you the freedom to air them up, if they are showing indications of being underinflated for the load you decide to carry. Poor wear on the tread surface. To much sidewall flex.
Tire wear indications, are still the best indicator. Wearing poorly on the edges, and handling is less then stellar? Air them up a bit.
Wearing in the center, and a harsh ride? Reduce the pressure.

https://www.safercar.gov/Vehicle-Sho...al-Information

Note the number of times the word "Recommendation" is used. The engineers and related people at the manufacturers, want to sell vehicles. They design the vehicles with the broadest appeal to sell more. They know most people will never come close to overloading their vehicles, but they will want something that rides comfortably, and safely. The idea the door sticker recommendation, is the "perfect pressure", is absurd.

You need to read your reference in more detail. SafeCar states that the recommended inflation pressures on your tire placard are the CORRECT inflation pressures for the OE tires.

I'm sure there is an attorney behind every PSI of air in each tire, just waiting for an opportunity to void a warranty. Or not.
There is, a mechanic at the dealers, who will be diagnosing a problem of "The ride is to rough", or "The steering is sluggish and the tires look flat and are wearing funny", who will go to the door sticker, to decide whether improper pressure is the problem.

The recommended pressure, is a place to start. The max ratings of the vehicle and it's suspension, is the place to quit.

It's why God gave us thumbs, and the ability to reason. I'm sure there are plenty of days, He shakes his head.
See the orange above.
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Old 08-15-2018, 03:08 AM   #34
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Should the tires pressure be different in my TV when I am towing vs. not towing?
The correct inflation pressures for the OE tires is found on the tire placard. If the vehicle manufacturer has foreseen the need for additional inflation pressures while towing another vehicle they will have listed them in the vehicle owner manual.
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Old 08-15-2018, 06:38 AM   #35
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See the orange above.


You need to stop inferring stuff thatís not there.
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Old 08-15-2018, 09:58 AM   #36
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You need to stop inferring stuff that’s not there.
Sorry, I didn't read your safecar reference because I already knew how they describe the correct tire inflation pressures. You'll find it in this safecar reference.

https://www.safercar.gov/Vehicle-Sho...at-is-your-PSI

Documents published under the SafeCar heading are NHTSA documents. NHTSA has a document where anyone can ask for an interpretation. For your own personal information you could get an answer for the word recommendation, when used to describe tire inflation pressures. Their answer will be more precise than mine.

https://one.nhtsa.gov/nhtsa/safety1n...oJune2013.html
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Old 08-15-2018, 04:28 PM   #37
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The sea lawyers are out and about. But the regulations and lawyering can never cover every situation.

The "best" tire pressure for a car/truck/SUV is going to vary, depending on vehicle load, desired ride smoothness, how much you are willing to sacrifice tire wear and margin for comfort, type of pavement, pavement and air temperature, anticipated altitude change, etc. Saying you must conform to the placard is just plain stupid.

But the placard pressure is a great starting point for figuring out what the best pressure for you is. Through experimentation (better called trial and error), I have found I prefer 2-3 PSI over the placard pressure in most circumstances. This is for a minivan. This produces a reasonable ride with very even tire wear at normal loading. Higher than plus 3 PSI gives a noticeably harsher ride.

When I hook up the camper, I go to 4-6 PSI over placard. I use Michelins which have a max inflation 45 PSI. This seems to work well with our A-frame, tongue weight, and WDH weight transfer. If we are going east, I tend to use the higher pressures because of the pressure reduction from losing altitude.

When I mounted LT tires on my Ford Explorer because the Alaska gravel tore up passenger tires so badly, I found that I had to do more adjustment of tire pressures to suit the load and conditions than with passenger tires.

just my experiences and sometimes common sense
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Old 08-21-2018, 03:25 PM   #38
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while i was referring to diesel pushers - hereís a link for trucks and trailers

Tire Pressure Secrets for Camping Trailers & Tow Vehicles | PopUpBackpacker

I looked at the site and as a tire engineer I immediately saw a number of questionable statements. IMO I think the author does not have sufficient background in tire design or engineering to understand that the 44 psi "max" on the sidewall is related to the initial bead seating pressure. If he was interested in providing accurate and useful information he would have provided some method to contact him so we could point out some of his statements are misleading.
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Old 08-21-2018, 03:29 PM   #39
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Should the tires pressure be different in my TV when I am towing vs. not towing?

Simple answer is YES. Since proper load capacity is a function of having the proper inflation and since towing will increase the load on the TV rear tires by a few hundred to more than !,000# depending on the trailer you will most likely need to adjust your pressure unless you are running the "towing inflation" all the time.
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Old 08-21-2018, 03:31 PM   #40
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typically more weight requires LESS pressure, not more, and certainly not the Max - your tire brand/type/size and your TV weight with trailer tongue weight will determine the correct pressure... it may be less than you think.

ABSOLUTELY WRONG.


Why do you think the Load Inflation tables used by every tire company show increased load capacity with increased inflation.
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