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Old 09-27-2020, 04:31 PM   #1
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TT Dealership Observation

Thought this post would spark some interest. I have viewed FR for quite some time but, here is a possible "Buyer Beware" situation. I have owned TT(s) for some years and frankly always depended on TT dealerships and vehicle OEM(s) to provide factual towing capabilities. Yes, when speaking about towing, check the sticker on the vehicle door, don't go over GVWR......but, I am speaking about towing stability. I have become tried of white knuckle driving (with a F150). My recent investigation found that my tires are inadequate, my WDH, is inadequate, as well as, suspension, i.e. air springs over leafs. The point I am making, is when you are buying a TT from a dealership they do not seem to discuss these vehicle thoughts with you based on the TT selection; all they say is YEAH, your vehicle can tow it.......nothing about stability.....Lessons learned...
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Old 09-27-2020, 05:32 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Defire78 View Post
Thought this post would spark some interest. I have viewed FR for quite some time but, here is a possible "Buyer Beware" situation. I have owned TT(s) for some years and frankly always depended on TT dealerships and vehicle OEM(s) to provide factual towing capabilities. Yes, when speaking about towing, check the sticker on the vehicle door, don't go over GVWR......but, I am speaking about towing stability. I have become tried of white knuckle driving (with a F150). My recent investigation found that my tires are inadequate, my WDH, is inadequate, as well as, suspension, i.e. air springs over leafs. The point I am making, is when you are buying a TT from a dealership they do not seem to discuss these vehicle thoughts with you based on the TT selection; all they say is YEAH, your vehicle can tow it.......nothing about stability.....Lessons learned...
Might be helpful if you also included the specs on both your truck and trailer.
Bottom line is that the consumer needs to do research and educate themselves BEFORE buying a trailer. In this Age of Information where anything you need to know is at your fingertips, I see so many buyers that have done little to nothing to inform themselves.
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Old 09-27-2020, 05:59 PM   #3
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A big part of the problem is that you’re looking for concrete answers to issues regarding personal comfort. What I’m comfortable with in terms of stability and towing performance may be very different than you. At the very best all a dealer can do is attempt to locate the towing specs for your truck and then tell you if you will meet that with what you’re planning to tow. Even that isn’t the easiest to do. Say you’re looking at a trailer that weighs 4400 dry (actual dry weight) and your TV is rated to tow 5k. Some people will have no problem staying within that because they load lightly while others pack everything they own including the kitchen sink. At this point you’ll have forum members give advice such as “choose a trailer with a GVWR that is 80% of your tow rating”, but that’s pretty useless advice, too, in my opinion. That trailer I mentioned earlier that actually weighs 4400 dry could have a GVWR of 5400 or 7800, for example. The advice above could tel you that you’re safe to tow the 5400 but not the 7800 when in actuality you’d be hauling the same weight( you’d have just chosen a trailer that has much less tire and axle rating margin most likely which is NOT a good thing.) And that 80% rule is worthless too. Many people that tow at 100% (and often more) in a 3/4 ton diesel and are perfectly happy with the performance would likely loathe towing at 50% of the tow rating in a naturally aspirated gas engine. And then there’s the issue of WHERE you’ll be towing. The guy that hooks up and heads 30 minutes away to the local lake at 55mph is probably going to be much more forgiving about towing performance and stability than the guy towing thousands of miles a year in all types of climates and terrain.
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Old 09-27-2020, 06:43 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by dustman_stx View Post
A big part of the problem is that you’re looking for concrete answers to issues regarding personal comfort. What I’m comfortable with in terms of stability and towing performance may be very different than you. At the very best all a dealer can do is attempt to locate the towing specs for your truck and then tell you if you will meet that with what you’re planning to tow. Even that isn’t the easiest to do. Say you’re looking at a trailer that weighs 4400 dry (actual dry weight) and your TV is rated to tow 5k. Some people will have no problem staying within that because they load lightly while others pack everything they own including the kitchen sink. At this point you’ll have forum members give advice such as “choose a trailer with a GVWR that is 80% of your tow rating”, but that’s pretty useless advice, too, in my opinion. That trailer I mentioned earlier that actually weighs 4400 dry could have a GVWR of 5400 or 7800, for example. The advice above could tel you that you’re safe to tow the 5400 but not the 7800 when in actuality you’d be hauling the same weight( you’d have just chosen a trailer that has much less tire and axle rating margin most likely which is NOT a good thing.) And that 80% rule is worthless too. Many people that tow at 100% (and often more) in a 3/4 ton diesel and are perfectly happy with the performance would likely loathe towing at 50% of the tow rating in a naturally aspirated gas engine. And then there’s the issue of WHERE you’ll be towing. The guy that hooks up and heads 30 minutes away to the local lake at 55mph is probably going to be much more forgiving about towing performance and stability than the guy towing thousands of miles a year in all types of climates and terrain.
15% of TT GVW should be < (Payload - ActualLoad) is the only rule I tell the few people who ask me about towing. ActualLoad is everything and everyone piled in the truck.
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