RV News RVBusiness 2021 Top 10 RVs of the Year, plus 56 additional debuts and must-see units → ×


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-28-2020, 09:53 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 30
Steering Damper/Steering Stabilizer/Sway Bars

I have a 2018 Sunseeker 3010DS. Considering improving the steering and sway. Have been suggested Billstein Steering Damper/Roadmaster Steering Stabilizer. Are they one in the same? Which would be better for the money? Are Hellwig Sway Bars needed for the money? Any help would be appreciated. Planning a very long trip next summer (5,000 miles)
__________________
Mark & Karen
and our 3 furry friends
Elkhorn, NE
2018 Sunseeker 3010DS

nuruls is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2020, 10:53 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2019
Posts: 1,500
What I understand about steering dampers: There is a stock damper there already. The Bilstein unit, I believe, is similar but just a more robust damper. However, I have read that the gas pressure in the damper tends to push the steering to one side. That makes sense but I have not tried a Bilstein damper to prove that. The Roadmaster steering stabilizer has a damper plus built-in coil springs that will self center the steering and resist sideways deflection. Safe-T-Plus is another brand stabilizer that has built in self centering springs. I have the Safe-T-Plus installed on mine. The STP does make the motorhome track on the highway with less steering input needed, but the down side is that the steering requires more effort at low speeds. I chose the STP because the springs and dampener shaft are covered, rather than exposed as on the Roadmaster.

Hellwig and Roadmaster sway bars are thicker and stiffer that stock. They will reduce body rolling side to side by limiting how much one side of the suspension can move with respect to the other side. I have a Hellwig on the rear axle. Current Forestster and Sunseeker Classic Ford models now come with a rear Hellwig sway bar as standard equipment.

If you haven’t already done so, have the front end alignment checked and adjusted, if necessary. Adding caster, up to 5* if it can be achieved, will help the steering track straight with less wandering and need to make small corrections. I would get the alignment checked/done before proceeding with the other modifications.

As far as “worth the money” goes, each time you spend a few hundred dollars here and a few hundred there, the handling gets a little better. Don’t expect night and day differences, but each of the modifications makes the handling a little better. None of the aforementioned mods will improve the ride comfort quality.

If you want to spend more money, and I mean a lot, lot more money, look in to the LiquidSpring system that replaces the traditional springs and shocks with a computer controlled compressible liquid suspension system. Supposedly the LiquidSpring will improve the ride comfort.
__________________
2020 Sunseeker 2440DS on 2019 Ford E-450, Trekker cap, Topaz paint
BehindBars is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2020, 08:54 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: NJ
Posts: 846
Quote:
Originally Posted by nuruls View Post
I have a 2018 Sunseeker 3010DS. Considering improving the steering and sway. Have been suggested Billstein Steering Damper/Roadmaster Steering Stabilizer. Are they one in the same? Which would be better for the money? Are Hellwig Sway Bars needed for the money? Any help would be appreciated. Planning a very long trip next summer (5,000 miles)
I have a 2016 3011DS and was in a similar situation a few years back. I had already installed a trac bar and rear sway bar before we made a 4000 Mile round trip to Denver. I wanted to have all the improvements done before this trip but just ran out of time. So off we went and hoped for the best. As it turns out this was the best thing that could have happened, sort of. On the way out through Missouri and Kansas we ran into a lot of high winds and the lack of a front sway bar and centering device was really evident. At the end of each day I was physically worn out from driving. After getting back home I quickly installed the front sway bar and ordered a Blue OX Tru Center Steering control. I will say after all the improvement s the Tru Center had the largest effect on reducing driving fatigue as it it really reduces the amount of physical effort to drive. The bonus with the Tru Center vs the Safety-Plus unit is the the Tru Center can be dynamically changed while driving. This became an apparent need after driving through Kansas as one day the winds where out of the South and the next they where out of the North. The Tru-Center can dynamically adjust the oversteer so that it can compensate for winds so that it tracks straight without your arms/shoulders doing the work. Additionally it also provides some safety of against losing steering control due to a tire blowout.

Bottom Line - Having only some improvements completed before the trip allowed me to do a before and after comparison so I can honestly say that ALL the improvements I made where well worth the investment.

PS - I have made a number of posts about the improvement over time if you search through some old posts.
__________________
2016 3011DS Forester
2014 Honda CRV

Chuck & Lois
newRVer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2020, 09:26 AM   #4
Usually Confused Member
 
emm-dee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Georgia
Posts: 3,623
Quote:
Originally Posted by BehindBars View Post
What I understand about steering dampers: There is a stock damper there already. The Bilstein unit, I believe, is similar but just a more robust damper. However, I have read that the gas pressure in the damper tends to push the steering to one side. That makes sense but I have not tried a Bilstein damper to prove that. The Roadmaster steering stabilizer has a damper plus built-in coil springs that will self center the steering and resist sideways deflection. Safe-T-Plus is another brand stabilizer that has built in self centering springs. I have the Safe-T-Plus installed on mine. The STP does make the motorhome track on the highway with less steering input needed, but the down side is that the steering requires more effort at low speeds. I chose the STP because the springs and dampener shaft are covered, rather than exposed as on the Roadmaster.

.................
Good info except about low speed effort. I had my alignment checked but still had major problems with constant drifting at highway speeds. I had to move the steering wheel so much you would think I was swatting flys.

I had the Safety-T-Plus installed and the difference was amazing. I wouldn’t classify the low speed steering as more effort. More like a different feel, and not even noticeable after a couple days of driving.

All the good stabilizers work about the same and are a good investment. I went with the STP because of the clean look and free installation at their distribution center. Don’t know about the others but the STP has a lifetime warranty.

We had a right front tire blow out last year while in rush hour traffic on I-20. The STP allowed me to drive onto the shoulder with no problems. I sent STP an email reporting the good solution to a serious problem. They immediately called me and said they prefer to replace the entire system after an event like we had. All I had to do was send in the old one for replacement or come to their location and they would do the replacement. I asked what could be the problem and they said probably nothing but they prefer to inspect the affected stabilizer for problems. They also said they’ve never found a problem...it was just company policy under the lifetime warranty.
__________________
2018 Forester 3051S (aka Clyde)
2015 Wrangler Toad (aka Bonnie)

At some point during every day you suddenly realize nothing else productive is going to happen the rest of that day. For me, it usually occurs around 9 am.
emm-dee is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2020, 09:39 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2019
Posts: 1,500
Quote:
Originally Posted by emm-dee View Post
Good info except about low speed effort. I had my alignment checked but still had major problems with constant drifting at highway speeds. I had to move the steering wheel so much you would think I was swatting flys.

I had the Safety-T-Plus installed and the difference was amazing. I wouldn’t classify the low speed steering as more effort. More like a different feel, and not even noticeable after a couple days of driving.

All the good stabilizers work about the same and are a good investment. I went with the STP because of the clean look and free installation at their distribution center. Don’t know about the others but the STP has a lifetime warranty.

We had a right front tire blow out last year while in rush hour traffic on I-20. The STP allowed me to drive onto the shoulder with no problems. I sent STP an email reporting the good solution to a serious problem. They immediately called me and said they prefer to replace the entire system after an event like we had. All I had to do was send in the old one for replacement or come to their location and they would do the replacement. I asked what could be the problem and they said probably nothing but they prefer to inspect the affected stabilizer for problems. They also said they’ve never found a problem...it was just company policy under the lifetime warranty.
That’s good feedback on the STP. I just installed ours on our E450 last summer. The steering self centering action is pronounced. The steering effort required to turn the wheel away from center at parking lot speeds is noticeably more than stock, so much that I have and am still considering removing the Safe-T-Plus. Our is the “silver” model, which they recommended. Is yours also the so called silver model?

I was also annoyed with the company because they refused to supply me all the torque specs required for the installation of their product, instead telling me I should contact Ford Motor Company myself.
__________________
2020 Sunseeker 2440DS on 2019 Ford E-450, Trekker cap, Topaz paint
BehindBars is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2020, 09:47 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
JWallet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by BehindBars View Post
What I understand about steering dampers: There is a stock damper there already. The Bilstein unit, I believe, is similar but just a more robust damper. However, I have read that the gas pressure in the damper tends to push the steering to one side. That makes sense but I have not tried a Bilstein damper to prove that. The Roadmaster steering stabilizer has a damper plus built-in coil springs that will self center the steering and resist sideways deflection. Safe-T-Plus is another brand stabilizer that has built in self centering springs. I have the Safe-T-Plus installed on mine. The STP does make the motorhome track on the highway with less steering input needed, but the down side is that the steering requires more effort at low speeds. I chose the STP because the springs and dampener shaft are covered, rather than exposed as on the Roadmaster.

Hellwig and Roadmaster sway bars are thicker and stiffer that stock. They will reduce body rolling side to side by limiting how much one side of the suspension can move with respect to the other side. I have a Hellwig on the rear axle. Current Forestster and Sunseeker Classic Ford models now come with a rear Hellwig sway bar as standard equipment.

If you haven’t already done so, have the front end alignment checked and adjusted, if necessary. Adding caster, up to 5* if it can be achieved, will help the steering track straight with less wandering and need to make small corrections. I would get the alignment checked/done before proceeding with the other modifications.

As far as “worth the money” goes, each time you spend a few hundred dollars here and a few hundred there, the handling gets a little better. Don’t expect night and day differences, but each of the modifications makes the handling a little better. None of the aforementioned mods will improve the ride comfort quality.

If you want to spend more money, and I mean a lot, lot more money, look in to the LiquidSpring system that replaces the traditional springs and shocks with a computer controlled compressible liquid suspension system. Supposedly the LiquidSpring will improve the ride comfort.


Great information. My 2020 3010ds on some roads is a handful to drive. Sometimes it feels like the steering wheel pulls left and right on its own and that keeps me on my toes just to keep it between the lines in my lane. I’m not a rookie driver. During my work career I have driven every type of truck out there including an 18 wheeler and personally owned my own trucking company at one time. I put 5K miles on my MH this past season and have gotten some what used to it although I don’t like it. With that said I plan on looking at some of the options suggested but first thing is is a front end alignment the spring.
JWallet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2020, 10:31 AM   #7
Usually Confused Member
 
emm-dee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Georgia
Posts: 3,623
Quote:
Originally Posted by BehindBars View Post
That’s good feedback on the STP. I just installed ours on our E450 last summer. The steering self centering action is pronounced. The steering effort required to turn the wheel away from center at parking lot speeds is noticeably more than stock, so much that I have and am still considering removing the Safe-T-Plus. Our is the “silver” model, which they recommended. Is yours also the so called silver model?

I was also annoyed with the company because they refused to supply me all the torque specs required for the installation of their product, instead telling me I should contact Ford Motor Company myself.
Yes, I hAve the silver model. I just don’t see a problem with steering effort at slow speeds.

I just checked and with the Forester parked I was able to easily move the wheel with two fingers.

__________________
2018 Forester 3051S (aka Clyde)
2015 Wrangler Toad (aka Bonnie)

At some point during every day you suddenly realize nothing else productive is going to happen the rest of that day. For me, it usually occurs around 9 am.
emm-dee is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2020, 01:56 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Bath, NY
Posts: 85
I put a Safe - T - Plus stabilizer on my 2016 Forester DS after the first trip. It made a world of difference in many ways, mostly passing and being passed my semis and in crosswinds.
johnshoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2020, 02:21 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Oldnapapartsguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: Southwest Missouri
Posts: 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by BehindBars View Post
What I understand about steering dampers: There is a stock damper there already. The Bilstein unit, I believe, is similar but just a more robust damper. However, I have read that the gas pressure in the damper tends to push the steering to one side. That makes sense but I have not tried a Bilstein damper to prove that. The Roadmaster steering stabilizer has a damper plus built-in coil springs that will self center the steering and resist sideways deflection. Safe-T-Plus is another brand stabilizer that has built in self centering springs. I have the Safe-T-Plus installed on mine. The STP does make the motorhome track on the highway with less steering input needed, but the down side is that the steering requires more effort at low speeds. I chose the STP because the springs and dampener shaft are covered, rather than exposed as on the Roadmaster.

Hellwig and Roadmaster sway bars are thicker and stiffer that stock. They will reduce body rolling side to side by limiting how much one side of the suspension can move with respect to the other side. I have a Hellwig on the rear axle. Current Forestster and Sunseeker Classic Ford models now come with a rear Hellwig sway bar as standard equipment.

If you haven’t already done so, have the front end alignment checked and adjusted, if necessary. Adding caster, up to 5* if it can be achieved, will help the steering track straight with less wandering and need to make small corrections. I would get the alignment checked/done before proceeding with the other modifications.

As far as “worth the money” goes, each time you spend a few hundred dollars here and a few hundred there, the handling gets a little better. Don’t expect night and day differences, but each of the modifications makes the handling a little better. None of the aforementioned mods will improve the ride comfort quality.

If you want to spend more money, and I mean a lot, lot more money, look in to the LiquidSpring system that replaces the traditional springs and shocks with a computer controlled compressible liquid suspension system. Supposedly the LiquidSpring will improve the ride comfort.
X2. Great explanation, well thought out.
Oldnapapartsguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2020, 04:14 PM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Mono, ON Canada
Posts: 64
My 2020 3011DS came from the factory with Ride-Rite air bags, front and rear Bilstein shocks and a rear Hellwig sway bar so it drove reasonably well from new. I support the previous recommendations to start with a font end alignment. That alone made a noticeable improvement to mine. The steering still required some constant attention to keep it going straight so I added a Roadmaster steering stabilizer which helped a lot. I picked the Roadmaster base on a lot of positive internet reviews.
I was still getting some blowing around by passing semis so I then added a front Hellwig sway bar and that was a noticeable improvement. I picked the Hellwig over Roadmaster since it was a couple of hundred dollars cheaper in Canada. Both brands had good reviews.
I am quite pleased with the handling now except sometimes the rear end gets blown around a bit by passing trucks when I am towing the Jeep. I hope to be doing a lot more towing next summer so I plan to install a SuperSteer rear trac bar before then. I would be interested in any feedback from owners who have installed a rear trac bar, what type they installed and why, how they liked the result.
My recommendation to owners starting out is to do one thing at a time and see how you like the result. Then move on to the next modification, if required. The Forester or any other C Class will never handle like a sports car but it can be quite pleasant and civilized to drive with the appropriate modifications. My wife never really enjoyed driving any of our previous RVs but she is quite happy driving this one, even when towing the Jeep.
Good luck with yours.
__________________
2020 FR Forester 3011DS (2018 E-450 Chassis)
Toad:2018 Wrangler Rubicon Unlimited
HYDROG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2020, 04:30 PM   #11
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Location: Batavia, OH
Posts: 14
I have a bit bigger motorhome, but it experiences - or even amplifies - the steering wander/wind problems to the extent that my wife refused to drive it, even though she had driven all of the rental units we used to gauge our readiness to go RVing on a more consistent basis. I added the SafeTPlus (blue) stabilizer this summer, and it has made a world of difference. Don't get me wrong. It is still a bus, but far better mannered in wind and with passing semis. She will even drive it now. As mentioned by others, it does change the low speed handling a bit, since it exerts 230 lbs. in both directions away from center, but it becomes routine in short order.
__________________
Roger B. Batavia, OH. Georgetown XL. No toad, just a dolly.
Roger Baxter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2020, 04:58 PM   #12
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Yorktown VA
Posts: 70
Steering damper

I installed the road master steering damper, front sway bar and bilsteen shocks on my Lexington 283gts. It did improve the overall performance of the rig. Before having that gear installed, I drove all over the country with the stock stuff without any real problems. The most notable improvement is when tractor trailers pass me on the interstate I don't sway as much. Overall, I think these upgrades are worth the money.


Quote:
Originally Posted by BehindBars View Post
What I understand about steering dampers: There is a stock damper there already. The Bilstein unit, I believe, is similar but just a more robust damper. However, I have read that the gas pressure in the damper tends to push the steering to one side. That makes sense but I have not tried a Bilstein damper to prove that. The Roadmaster steering stabilizer has a damper plus built-in coil springs that will self center the steering and resist sideways deflection. Safe-T-Plus is another brand stabilizer that has built in self centering springs. I have the Safe-T-Plus installed on mine. The STP does make the motorhome track on the highway with less steering input needed, but the down side is that the steering requires more effort at low speeds. I chose the STP because the springs and dampener shaft are covered, rather than exposed as on the Roadmaster.

Hellwig and Roadmaster sway bars are thicker and stiffer that stock. They will reduce body rolling side to side by limiting how much one side of the suspension can move with respect to the other side. I have a Hellwig on the rear axle. Current Forestster and Sunseeker Classic Ford models now come with a rear Hellwig sway bar as standard equipment.

If you haven’t already done so, have the front end alignment checked and adjusted, if necessary. Adding caster, up to 5* if it can be achieved, will help the steering track straight with less wandering and need to make small corrections. I would get the alignment checked/done before proceeding with the other modifications.

As far as “worth the money” goes, each time you spend a few hundred dollars here and a few hundred there, the handling gets a little better. Don’t expect night and day differences, but each of the modifications makes the handling a little better. None of the aforementioned mods will improve the ride comfort quality.

If you want to spend more money, and I mean a lot, lot more money, look in to the LiquidSpring system that replaces the traditional springs and shocks with a computer controlled compressible liquid suspension system. Supposedly the LiquidSpring will improve the ride comfort.
Luke Moseley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2020, 06:52 PM   #13
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Location: Batavia, OH
Posts: 14
Don't get me wrong. I drove the MH all over, and didn't think too much about the wander, but I started driving buses and big trucks in the Army. I thought it was (comparatively) normal. It was only when my better half refused to drive it anymore that I realized that I had to improve the handling. The steering stabilizer and some changes to the rear springs accomplished that.
__________________
Roger B. Batavia, OH. Georgetown XL. No toad, just a dolly.
Roger Baxter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2020, 01:15 PM   #14
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 39
Some E350/E450 RVs have handling issues, some do not, the following may explain the difference:

Ford ships all E350/E450 cut aways with identical fixed, non adjustable
caster/camber sleeves, "one size fits all". You can recognize these sleeves because they are keyed and cannot be rotated. They are marked "F8UA-AA 0+.25" on the passenger side and "E97A-CA +0-0" on the drivers side.

The RV builder almost never changes the Ford sleeves, as a result:

If the final RV build is nose down one degree then the runtime caster will be about +3.5 degrees. These units can have a real wandering problem.

If the final RV build is nose level then the runtime caster will be about +4.5 degrees. These units are probably indifferent.

If the final RV build is nose up one degree then the runtime caster will be about +5.5 degrees. These units are probably just fine, possibly excepting the 31+ footers.

So, some RVs have a problem with wandering at highway speeds and some do not have a problem.

Note that all three zones mentioned above are within the broad Ford caster specification. As a result it is easy to get short changed by the "tweak the toe and we are good to go" alignment. Discuss your symptoms up front, do not expect a normal alignment will address your handling problem.

POPULAR MECHANICS MAY 1973:
START QUOTE:
If too little caster exists, the car will wander and weave,
thus necessitating constant corrections in steering.
END QUOTE:
Harvard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2020, 06:31 AM   #15
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Posts: 1
may I ask a Q newbie here 2008 Lexington 300SS gts Im interested in upgrading my new to me RV with sway/stabilizers/helwig spgs the works The RV mechanic says they will install but I need to purchase and Im lost. I had done alot of research on Jayco Jride system and I think I want that on my Lexi...any specific advice?
Aksally99709 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2020, 07:43 AM   #16
Ambassador Member
 
Duckogram's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Flawda
Posts: 2,746
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aksally99709 View Post
may I ask a Q newbie here 2008 Lexington 300SS gts Im interested in upgrading my new to me RV with sway/stabilizers/helwig spgs the works The RV mechanic says they will install but I need to purchase and Im lost. I had done alot of research on Jayco Jride system and I think I want that on my Lexi...any specific advice?
Can’t give specifics because current parts may not fit your ‘08. Basically you need to decide exactly what handling characteristic you do not like and then add the upgrade that will address that specifically. Jayco uses the Hellwig 9645 Load Pro 35 series helper spring for tail sag and balancing vs the Firestone RideRite air spring that FR uses. Obviously, the air is easily adjustable but they leak and need regular attention whereas the Hellwigs are set it and forget it.
__________________
Just Ducky
Towing Smart
No PM’s (they are not private anyway)
Posting exclusively in the Forester/Sunseeker section for the amusement of fellow Forester/Sunseeker owners.
Duckogram is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2020, 10:38 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2019
Posts: 1,500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harvard View Post
Some E350/E450 RVs have handling issues, some do not, the following may explain the difference:

Ford ships all E350/E450 cut aways with identical fixed, non adjustable
caster/camber sleeves, "one size fits all". You can recognize these sleeves because they are keyed and cannot be rotated. They are marked "F8UA-AA 0+.25" on the passenger side and "E97A-CA +0-0" on the drivers side.

The RV builder almost never changes the Ford sleeves, as a result:

If the final RV build is nose down one degree then the runtime caster will be about +3.5 degrees. These units can have a real wandering problem.

If the final RV build is nose level then the runtime caster will be about +4.5 degrees. These units are probably indifferent.

If the final RV build is nose up one degree then the runtime caster will be about +5.5 degrees. These units are probably just fine, possibly excepting the 31+ footers.

So, some RVs have a problem with wandering at highway speeds and some do not have a problem.

Note that all three zones mentioned above are within the broad Ford caster specification. As a result it is easy to get short changed by the "tweak the toe and we are good to go" alignment. Discuss your symptoms up front, do not expect a normal alignment will address your handling problem.

POPULAR MECHANICS MAY 1973:
START QUOTE:
If too little caster exists, the car will wander and weave,
thus necessitating constant corrections in steering.
END QUOTE:
Another aspect of Forest River failing to check alignment after building the RV on the chassis, is the front end camber and how it is affected by the weight on the front axle. The Ford E-Series’ twin I-beam front suspension design is subject to camber variations depending on how much the front suspension is compressed. Our particular class C unit was built light on the front axle (4000 pounds), and that may explain why the camber was out of spec as delivered.

The adjustable sleeves mentioned in the quoted post have a limited range, and affect both caster and camber. In the case of our Sunseeker, the need to get the camber in spec allowed us to be able to get only 4.5 degrees caster. Nonetheless, the most aggressive sleeves still put the front end alignment in dead middle of Ford specs.

It’s just too bad the buyer has to deal with this after purchase, when Forest River could have just delivered an in-spec chassis, properly adjusted at the factory.
__________________
2020 Sunseeker 2440DS on 2019 Ford E-450, Trekker cap, Topaz paint
BehindBars is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
stabilizer, stabilizers, sway

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Forest River, Inc. or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:55 PM.