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Old 02-10-2017, 08:08 PM   #1
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Thinking of upgrading to a Class C. Need some opinions please.

Hi folks! I've been a member of the FR Forums for awhile but since I have a Rockwood Roo hybrid, I usually hang out over on that forum. However, I would like to upgrade to a Class C. I retired about 6 months ago & would like to do a lot more traveling, possibly even full-timing for awhile. Love my Roo but it does require a lot of set-up and take down. I think a Class C would be easier to deal with, especially for short stays.

I've been pretty happy with my Roo so my experience with FR has been positive so far - which makes me consider a FR Class C. What are the main differences between the Forester & the Sunseeker? Any major pros & cons with either?

I'm a single woman who would most likely be traveling alone or with another woman (friend or relative) and at least one dog. Looking for something that would be a happy medium between large enough that I don't feel too crowded but small enough that it would be fairly easy to drive. And affordable, of course! Any recommendations?

Thanks!
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Old 02-10-2017, 08:25 PM   #2
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Take a guess at what size you might want and rent one - try it for a week or so. Experience will give you a much better perspective of what will work for you than my opinion could. We rented for a week-long trip before we bought - helped a lot with our decision process.
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Old 02-10-2017, 08:36 PM   #3
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Several people have suggested renting but all the rental units I can find are really expensive! But I may give it a try anyway. Thanks!
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Molly, my camping cockapoo, crossed the Rainbow Bridge in May 2020. She was almost 18. Still miss her.
My new companion is Maggie, a maltipoo. She was a year old in April.
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Old 02-10-2017, 09:04 PM   #4
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Down side to a C class, if you are not towing a toad and you need/want to go out for something you have to break camp and drive your MH to get it. I am on my second C class now and speaking from experience sometimes its a pain in the a.. .( I have now started towing) But we really do like the Forester 3051 nice big slide , gives lots of room in side.
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Old 02-10-2017, 09:11 PM   #5
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I switched from a travel trailer to a class C and wouldn't go back. I do tow a Honda CR-V behind it, but over all, towing a car behind an RV is easier than towing a trailer behind a truck. I can't really say what model you might like, I would suggest checking them all out. Even other brands. So far I love my Sunseeker and hope to have it many more years.
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Old 02-10-2017, 11:18 PM   #6
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Yeah, towing is one reason I'm thinking of upgrading. The Roo is right at the top end of what my Durango is rated to handle and I live in the mountains so towing can be a little stressful sometimes. I figured towing a smaller vehicle with a larger vehicle would be easier than towing the big one with the little one. LOL!

Also, I've talked to some folks with motorhomes that don't have a toad but get a rental when they're staying for an extended time. Seems like that could get a little costly. My plan is to trade the Durango for a smaller, more gas efficient model that can be towed 4-down. Lots of things to consider!
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Molly, my camping cockapoo, crossed the Rainbow Bridge in May 2020. She was almost 18. Still miss her.
My new companion is Maggie, a maltipoo. She was a year old in April.
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Old 02-11-2017, 05:18 AM   #7
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We have never towed a large trailer, so we have not shared that experience with you, but here are my thoughts...
It is all about the floor plan and how you roll. My wife and I looked at a lot of different makes and models, classes a,b,c. Our idea was to get the smallest unit we could both tolerate to enable us the most freedom of movement, ease of set-up, and fuel economy. I really liked class b's... some of those really pack a lot of functionality in a small space. But they are generally pretty pricey, the bathrooms are mostly tiny, and the space can be confining. We rented a pretty nice one, and there was a lot to like, but we were bumping in to each other all the time, and she hated the "wet bath" (toilet, sink, and shower all in one space). There are a lot of class A's (and C's) that have wonderful, apartment-like floor plans, but are just too large for us to imagine poking around with on side roads, let alone fueling up on a regular basis. For us, the smaller class C's seemed to hit the happy medium... more space, decent sized bathroom with separate shower, and generally decent pricing. We went with a SunSeeker MBS 2400 W, which is 25' long, has a diesel engine for a little better mileage, a very large slide the seems to double the interior space with the push of a button, a very comfortable bed, and a nice bath. In the first year of ownership we are coming up on about 110 days on the road and 16000 miles, and are very happy.

Recently we added a toad, and this has changed the "how we roll" aspect considerably... Here again, we got the smallest car we could tolerate. This makes towing it easier and more economical. Now we are looking for spots where we are happy to pause for a few days, with the toad being the neat little "fine detail exploring" vehicle. I share your feeling about towing big things with small vehicles, but be prepared for a fairly big expense setting up a vehicle for "4 down" towing. Hardware and installation can easily hit $5K.

Enjoy your search!
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Old 02-11-2017, 08:34 AM   #8
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Several people have suggested renting but all the rental units I can find are really expensive! But I may give it a try anyway. Thanks!
Usually the price isn't too bad unless you put on a lot of miles. A few days in a nearby state park will most likely tell you a lot. I think you will find you want a toad.
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Old 02-11-2017, 09:07 AM   #9
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I've read on other threads where people will rent U-haul trucks to get the feel and check out the drive trains that are close to whats in class c rvs.
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Old 02-11-2017, 09:34 AM   #10
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We traveled with a toad using the flat tow approach. That approach allows you to yank the tow bar and stow it in your rig when you arrive at your destination. No trailer to stow or move off site if the campsite doesn't allow for trailers on site. The down side was the setup cost. Not including the cost of the the vehicle I dropped about 2500.00 on a tow bar, bracketry for the toad, wiring for tow lighting on the toad, and a brake controller for the toad. Factor in the cost of the toad maintenance and depreciation and you could call enterprise many many times before you eclipsed that cost.

In my case the car we were towing was also a daily driver so the vehicle cost was factored into the daily bills already but for a full timer I might consider getting a small scooter or moped that can be loaded on the back of the rig using a dolly and no additional gear. Easy to load and unload, a place to hold more gear when moving. IF you need a car for something more than an errand run you can call Enterprise.

Scooter options are all over the map:

2016 Honda Metropolitan for sale in Winston-Salem, NC | Honda, Sea-Doo & Can-Am of Winston-Salem (888) 383-4021

Trikes 3-Wheelers - Three Wheeler Motor Bikes - Trike Scooter


Lots of options out there for Dollys as well

Mountain Master Truck Equipment

WanderMan: Hitch Mounted Carriers...Getting It Up...And Safely!

There are other advantages to this approach. You can scooter around the campsite at will. You don't have that toad pivot point to worry about when backing up. Your physical footprint on the road is much smaller making even a 32 foot class C an easier driver. Vehicle maintenance is MUCH cheaper.
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Old 02-11-2017, 09:36 AM   #11
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For the wife and I we do fine with a 2300, but we roll alot and wanted drivability. With our toad we can accomidate just about any parking lot. Beyon the floor plan consider the attributes of a gas/electric hot water, heat pump, slide or no slide. As you know with your roo there are things that you want or need.

The best part of the C (or any MH) is that going outside is an opportunity, not a requriment. We have spent many a night in route "pulled over" have dinner watch tv sleep and never stepping footone outside.

And dont forget fresh popcorn while driving.....
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Old 02-11-2017, 02:42 PM   #12
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A lady traveling alone pulled out yesterday. She made the same change we did ~~ eliminated the class A for a 5er. We both believe that is a huge upgrade. After we sold the class A we had enough to buy a new diesel truck and 5er. Not only cash still ahead but expenses much lower.
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Old 02-11-2017, 02:57 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AMarrs View Post
Hi folks! I've been a member of the FR Forums for awhile but since I have a Rockwood Roo hybrid, I usually hang out over on that forum. However, I would like to upgrade to a Class C. I retired about 6 months ago & would like to do a lot more traveling, possibly even full-timing for awhile. Love my Roo but it does require a lot of set-up and take down. I think a Class C would be easier to deal with, especially for short stays.

I've been pretty happy with my Roo so my experience with FR has been positive so far - which makes me consider a FR Class C. What are the main differences between the Forester & the Sunseeker? Any major pros & cons with either?

I'm a single woman who would most likely be traveling alone or with another woman (friend or relative) and at least one dog. Looking for something that would be a happy medium between large enough that I don't feel too crowded but small enough that it would be fairly easy to drive. And affordable, of course! Any recommendations?

Thanks!
The main difference between the Sunseeker and the Forester is that the Forester has more up-graded surfaces, such as a soft ceiling, solid surface kitchen countertop, better LED ceiling lights, fiberglass running boards, better quality cabinets, etc. Look on the Forest River RV website and they have brochures on both on-line that shows the standard features and options. Some of the items that are standard on the Forester are options on the Sunseeker.
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Old 02-11-2017, 03:18 PM   #14
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Thumbs up

I have had pop-up trailers, a Class A and 2 Class Cs. My wife and I are both retired and we own a 2016 Forester 3051. I personally like a class C better. I usually travel with just my wife. some times my daughter will come and sometimes my son and his wife will go with us. I found that with a class c you have permeant sleeping arraignments for 4 people. I like the handling of the Class c better, the fuel mileage is better, my unit is only 32' so I can find a lot of campsites to include camping at BLM and Forestry lands.
Last year when my unit was new I didn't tow any cars and if I was staying somewhere for any length of time I just rented a car. I have now brought an 2016 Chevy Equinox to tow. In your case I may suggest you look at a Class B or B+. But I do enjoy my Class C, I alredy have almost 12000 miles on it.
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Old 02-11-2017, 03:47 PM   #15
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My wife and I went from a pop-up to a 21ft Class C and love it. We typically rent a car - sometimes having Enterprise "pick us up" if the rental place isn't convenient.
After doing the math, it made lots more sense to rent a car each time than incur the costs associated with having a towed car.
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Old 02-11-2017, 04:39 PM   #16
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We have a Class C (2011 Lexington 283), and I (the wife) do all the driving, set-up, etc., due to my husband's disability. I've pulled trailers, and have found driving the C is more comfortable. It would be best if you could borrow one for a weekend to get the feel and would help you decide. There are pllenty of used units to check out and save some dough. Let someone else drive out the depreciation, I say. More slides = less storage compartments. That is what I miss the most-large compartments. But if you're flying solo, you can get creative with the space you have. I tow a Ford Edge with a Roadmaster Sterling tow bar and Brake Buddy for toad brakes. Towing equipment can get very costly if you have to hire out installation, as I did. We found the Brake Buddy used, so saved a bit there. If you take your time, you can find a vehicle with towing stuff on it already. There's always the folks who have to upgrade every few years. Check the RV sales sites for toads. I know when I sell my Edge, I'm going to try to sell it first with the Roadmaster tow bar included. Helping out a fellow RV'r, if I can.
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Old 02-11-2017, 05:30 PM   #17
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I will add my 2 cents here regarding class c's. We started out with a 21' FR Lexington 210 on a GM chassis. That is the unit that has the rear door. It was our first unit. Very easy to drive, good gas mileage and able to turn on a dime. Not much storage and a small bathroom. The bed was a jack knife couch and the dinette which when lowered offered a reasonable sleeping area. Larger than a king we slept on the mattresses with sleeping bags. After two years of going back and forth across the good old USA we yearned for a larger unit offering more space and a larger real bed.
This led to a purchase of a Thor Chateau with one slide on a Ford chassis, was 25' long that offered that "corner bed thing"! Lot more space and storage, less gas mileage, and not as easy to turn around of course as the small 21. After two weeks on the road my wife informed me that she hated that dam corner bed.
That would be only one of the things that motivated us to upgrade in a year to a Sunseeker 32' 3100S on a Ford chassis. The Thor was one of those purchases you read about often where the unit just does not live up to expectations. Too many design issues and engineering problems left us with no faith in the unit or the manufacturer.
The 3100s with the one slide has been great especially the walk around bed. Lots of storage and convenience items and a large bathroom and separate shower. The downside is of course the size. You do not want to get into too many tight spots as this guy does not turn on a dime. We do not tow yet but are considering it.
Hope this gives you some additional input that may be of help to you in your situation.
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Old 02-11-2017, 06:22 PM   #18
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While you are considering options -- take a look at the Class A's as an alternative. Several single women who RV we know are driving Georgetowns and Berkshires and love it
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Old 02-11-2017, 06:51 PM   #19
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I'm also a single woman who downsized from a 32 ft class A to a Sunseeker 2300 after I was widowed. I bought a CRV but decided not to tow as the 2300 is so versatile. No slides. I just use the pump for water so all I have to do is unhook the electric and I'm ready to go. It is not much different than a stretch van to drive. My only problem is making the bed b/c it is not a walk around. Sometimes I travel with a friend and it is not cramped. I did remove the uncomfortable bench dinette and replace it with 2 comfy executive chairs.
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Old 02-11-2017, 06:56 PM   #20
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Having bought our first RV just 6 months ago take this advice as worth even less than you paid for it. We are a recently retired couple and weren't interested in investing in an expensive tow vehicle and didn't want a giant MH either. We also wanted to buy used. We looked at a few class B's and B pluses and one smaller class A but settled on the Sunseeker 2250LS primarily because it had an actual queen size bed that you could get around without disturbing your partner and a "full" bathroom with a separate shower. Our has the entertainment center over the cab so additional sleeping is limited to the dinette.

So far we are happy with it and figure we'll either tow the motorcycle or rent a car if we are in any one place long enough and want to go somewhere without breaking camp.

One thing I might do different is to replace the dinette with a reclining loveseat and convert the space above the cab to storage/sleeping like most of the 2250's I've seen.
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