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Old 09-09-2017, 07:50 AM   #21
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Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Colorado
Posts: 1,230
Quote:
Originally Posted by cseeger22 View Post
You can replace your trailer tires (ST's) with Light Truck tires and extend your tire life expectancy until they probably wear out with complete peace of mind. Or you can replace with ST's and go through all the hoop jumping to attempt to make sure they hold up for 4-5 years if you are lucky. Lucky, meaning that when the tires let go they just destroy the RV fender and not cause harm to you or your family. Send ST tire manufacturers a message that we won't spend our hard earned money on tires that don't last. No one says they are sorry for buying LT tires, tires that are tried and true from tough torture testing that prohibits any poor product from ever making production. Many deny that there is a problem, they can keep on buying as many ST tires as they want, way before they wear out, for as long as they want, jumping through all the hoops; covering, constantly checking air, using nitrogen, it's their money, time, headache, & repair. But many don't know that there is a choice, and there is now legitimate choices that have the load index that will be equal to or above whatever you need for an RV. If interested, consider doing some research on Nokian Tyre Company, may be found at Discount Tire. Nokian has what RV's need in terms of tires.

cseeger22
2016 Wolfpack 24pack14 Toyhauler
4 Nokian Rotiiva AT LT235/75R15
4 Hobie Mirage Revolution Kayaks
2004 Chevrolet Suburban Quadrasteer
I've heard that LT tires have more UV inhibitor than the ST tires. The complaint elsewhere that they don't have the load carrying capacity is not true except in the upper reaches of the F and G rated tires. For most of us that are running E's and D's you can shop the load capacity of the LT's and can find properly rated LT tires. I run Michelin XPS's with steel sidewall, and steel tread belts. These tires weigh a ton but are designed with a casing that is rated to be capped 3 times. They are a commercial tire. I had to go to a different size (225 85 16's were replaced with 245 75 16's) to get the proper load rating for my trailer. Tires are a little wider, but the same height as stock.
I will stick with the LT quality side of this argument.
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