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Old 09-06-2017, 09:36 AM   #1
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Time for new tires...

Well it is time for new tires all the way around my RV. The date codes on my tires are 2012 so they are 5 years old. From my research, it seems it is recommended to replace tires every 5 years regardless of mileage. I only have 23,000 miles on them and lots of tread left. But the more I look at my tires the more dry rot I see. I do store it outside on gravel, but it is parked between other RVs at the lot so it shouldn't really be getting too much direct sun. Is this just a part of RV life or is there something that can be done to prolong tire life?
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Old 09-06-2017, 09:53 AM   #2
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Tire covers can help on the appearance of your tires but I don't think they really extend their life. I just use the 5 year rule as well...

Before you buy tires look at joining the Family Motor Coach Association (FMCA). They offer two good tire replacement programs for Michelin and Continental tires. FMCA is $40 for annual dues and that includes FMCAssist, their emergency medical evacuation insurance. Their benefits are well worth the $40 annually to me...
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Old 09-06-2017, 09:55 AM   #3
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Tire covers used year-round will block UV rays, which contribute to the rubber drying out over time. Some prefer to raise the trailer up so pressure is off the wheels and they are off the ground for the off-season.
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Old 09-06-2017, 10:13 AM   #4
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As I understand there are several factors which lead to tire rot. First of all your tires are a combination of many chemicals these dry out over time. These chemicals are also affected by conditions surrounding the tires and use. Heat or UV rays will rot the tires so you could use a cover on them, and always drive slowly only on cool days. However, ozone also rots tires and those of us who live in cities with high ozone levels change tires more often regardless of covering. Then good old oxygen which is inside your tires also causes rot and this is from the inside out, which you cannot see. Finally just sitting unused is bad for tires. I have seen trailers in RV lots which sat unsold for a year or two with rotted tires.
So to answer your question is there a way to prolong the life? I guess you could fill them with nitrogen, move to a polar region, keep the tires covered, and roll them everyday. Or, like the rest of us, change them every four or five years.
Michelin has an airless tire on the market here is a
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Old 09-06-2017, 10:20 AM   #5
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I remember my first two-wheeler bicycle came with solid rubber tires. Talk about a harsh ride!
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Old 09-06-2017, 10:37 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayArras View Post
Tire covers used year-round will block UV rays, which contribute to the rubber drying out over time. Some prefer to raise the trailer up so pressure is off the wheels and they are off the ground for the off-season.
Tire covers are a must in the desert Southwest. DW truck tires were only 4-years old w/only 35k miles and all 4 the rubber was cracking. Michelin was great in prorating average 45% for all four. I read a while back that putting blocks under the tires during winter storage is recommended, and you mention it as well. Thx.
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Old 09-06-2017, 12:29 PM   #7
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"303 tire protectant" is a great way to delay dry rot. it was developed for aircraft tires that sit outside idle for long periods. cracking is more of a concern than actual age. good luck with your choice.
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Old 09-06-2017, 01:33 PM   #8
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I think my manual on tires suggests manual inspection after 5 years and always replace after 10 years. I kept mine covered and bought new on steer axle at 6 years because they were consistently losing air. Bought new drive axle at 7 years because I was going on a long trip and didn't want to chance it.
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Old 09-06-2017, 01:36 PM   #9
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10 years is way too long!
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Old 09-06-2017, 01:54 PM   #10
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Michelin states:
Some recreational vehicle owners may choose to
operate MICHELIN® tires after the tire warranty expires.
For consumers who choose to operate tires beyond the
tire’s warranted life, Michelin recommends frequent
tire inspections, especially before long trips. Michelin
recommends that any tires, including spare tires, should
be replaced after 10 years of service, even if they have not
reached the legal wear limit.

Like I said always after 10 years with visual inspection before that, I am just giving information from manufacturer who should know their product.
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Old 09-06-2017, 01:57 PM   #11
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Time for new tires...

Call Michelin and complain. They will send you to a dealer and have them checked. My 2014 where replaced at half price and I took the BF Goodrich over them and much better ride. I had 16000 miles on them
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Old 09-06-2017, 06:39 PM   #12
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Tire Replacement

You can replace your trailer tires (ST's) with Light Truck tires and extend your tire life expectancy until they probably wear out with complete peace of mind. Or you can replace with ST's and go through all the hoop jumping to attempt to make sure they hold up for 4-5 years if you are lucky. Lucky, meaning that when the tires let go they just destroy the RV fender and not cause harm to you or your family. Send ST tire manufacturers a message that we won't spend our hard earned money on tires that don't last. No one says they are sorry for buying LT tires, tires that are tried and true from tough torture testing that prohibits any poor product from ever making production. Many deny that there is a problem, they can keep on buying as many ST tires as they want, way before they wear out, for as long as they want, jumping through all the hoops; covering, constantly checking air, using nitrogen, it's their money, time, headache, & repair. But many don't know that there is a choice, and there is now legitimate choices that have the load index that will be equal to or above whatever you need for an RV. If interested, consider doing some research on Nokian Tyre Company, may be found at Discount Tire. Nokian has what RV's need in terms of tires.

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Old 09-06-2017, 08:39 PM   #13
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I just recived notice mine are being delivered today. Cant wait for the delivery truck to get here.
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Old 09-06-2017, 08:44 PM   #14
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Mine are on the way to Dealer

Quote:
Originally Posted by gmacklem View Post
Well it is time for new tires all the way around my RV. The date codes on my tires are 2012 so they are 5 years old. From my research, it seems it is recommended to replace tires every 5 years regardless of mileage. I only have 23,000 miles on them and lots of tread left. But the more I look at my tires the more dry rot I see. I do store it outside on gravel, but it is parked between other RVs at the lot so it shouldn't really be getting too much direct sun. Is this just a part of RV life or is there something that can be done to prolong tire life?
Just got word mine are being delivered today. Cant wait.
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Old 09-06-2017, 09:06 PM   #15
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Carlisle tires on a TT and 2 5ers with many 10s of thousands of miles and zero problems! Stated above LT tires are heavier ~~ please find a 235/85 tire as heavy as my Sailuns. Please find a reported failure of a Sailun. Many tire dealers will not install an LT tire on a trailer. LT tires do not have the weight carrying capacity of like sized ST tires which must be considered.
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Old 09-07-2017, 03:19 PM   #16
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around and around with tires

Asuming you are running 16×6 rims, any leads on alcoa rims? Going to retread the coach before a western adventure next fall and would love to ditch the wheel covers when we move to mich tire . Currently running factory generals with no complaints but everything else on the driveway has had michs for years. Anyone bought from a shop selling sets for a drw?

Hey, gmac.. we are a hour west of ya in C'ton.
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Old 09-07-2017, 06:55 PM   #17
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Speed Rating and Load Rating

Check you tires for speed rating and load rating. You can't go wrong with a higher rating on both. One reason for such poor ST performance is that they were rated for 65 mph max. until just recently. My tires are rated for 81 mph. Also be aware that most trailers come with tires barely rated to carry the empty trailer and they are overloaded when you take everything you need for camping. If you can upgrade the speed and load rating, you'll eliminate a ton of problems.
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Old 09-08-2017, 12:03 PM   #18
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Hey, gmac.. we are a hour west of ya in C'ton.


Getting new Michelins on this Saturday. Thinking about a westward trip next year too but haven't made any plans.
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Old 09-08-2017, 01:34 PM   #19
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Asuming you are running 16×6 rims, any leads on alcoa rims?
BuyTruckWheels.com has the best Alcoa prices I've found. And they actually have them in stock. See Here.
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Old 09-09-2017, 02:28 AM   #20
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I remember my first two-wheeler bicycle came with solid rubber tires. Talk about a harsh ride!
Yah but they lasted forever
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